Privacy law and the challenge of balancing employers’ management needs with employee privacy concern

November 1, 2010
The U.S. Supreme Court is weighing privacy questions involving NASA and whether federal employers have too much leeway when it comes to examining the private lives of employees just as Germany is poised to review changes to its Federal Data Protection Act (BDSG) next month.

Research Update

October 15, 2010
The online display ad market is projected to grow six percent in the next four years, according to an NPR report, and the practice is becoming increasingly lucrative. This month the advertising industry launched a new self-regulatory program for online behavioral advertising. The program aims to ward off tighter, government-imposed privacy regulations by making the practice more transparent. It features an icon next to advertisements that track users that links to a disclosure statement and gives consumers the chance to opt out.

Greetings

October 15, 2010
In this edition of Inside 1to1: Privacy, we explore the concept of "the right to be forgotten." While people in the offline world have, over the millennia, figured out how to leave little or no trace, the methods that served them do not translate to the online world, says one privacy expert in this month's lead story. Scuffing out our digital footprints, it seems, will require a new kind of thinking.

Understanding the “right to be forgotten” in a digital world

October 15, 2010
There are at least two opposing points of view when it comes to data retention, and they may well be at the core of many privacy debates across the globe. At issue is the idea of the "right to be forgotten," which has been talked about in many nations and at many levels of privacy discourse, and was illustrated one year ago when two French lawmakers introduced a bill that would give individuals that very right.

GMAC: Navigating EU approval for advanced biometrics

October 15, 2010
If you walk into a test center in Europe to take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), chances are you'll need to scan one of your palms to get in. Used by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC)--publisher of the GMAT--to combat various types of exam fraud, palm vein recognition has been proven to be one of the most accurate and least intrusive forms of biometric authentication. But without GMAC's pioneering efforts to work with EU regulators, palm-vein recognition would still be science fiction for most Europeans.

How will privacy apply to apps?

October 1, 2010
Critics of Apple’s policy to keep its criteria for third-party applications close to the vest were assuaged last week when the company revealed its guidelines. The App Store Review Guidelines include provisions on trademarks, data aggregation, user interfaces, violence, pornography and privacy. Apple published the rules in order to help developers “steer clear of issues as they develop apps” and to be sure users have a quality experience with the company’s products, according to the published guidelines.

Notes from the IAPP President

October 1, 2010
I write these words from Baltimore, Maryland, where it is sunny and hot on this early autumn day. Data protection pros are streaming in from near and far for this year’s Privacy Academy.

The Protection of Personal Information Bill, 9 of 2009

October 1, 2010
South African organizations have, for some time, inhabited a data protection law haven. Whilst the right to privacy is enshrined in the Constitution of South Africa, legislation that gives practical credence to such right and a regulator to govern and administer corresponding data protection and privacy practices has been absent. That’s about to change.

Privacy law and order: Are there too many cops on the beat?

October 1, 2010
There’s no question that there are more privacy cops on the beat in the U.S. than ever before, with regulators such as the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and Department of Health and Human Services—just to name a few—all responsible for portions of privacy regulation and enforcement.

Sharing and transferring personal data in cross-border transactions—A Nordic Perspective

October 1, 2010
Technological developments and globalization in business, combined with privacy rules, bring new challenges to lawyers assisting companies in cross-border transactions. Even though technology enables us to transfer personal data very quickly and easily to the other side of the world, privacy rules make the actual transfer more complex and compel us to follow specific procedures prior to transferring any personal data.

Greetings!

September 10, 2010
Few technological developments will impact data privacy as significantly as the smart grid. The smart grid will transmit energy usage data, in some cases down to the appliance level, from households to energy suppliers, resulting in a rich cache of some of our most intimate information.

Xcel Energy: Building privacy into the smart grid

September 10, 2010
Smart grids are on their way to becoming mainstream, but what does that mean for consumers, whose detailed household energy data will be aggregated and potentially shared in ways previously unimagined? Should retailers, marketers, defense attorneys and law enforcement have access to the data?

Survival of the fittest 2.0

September 10, 2010
Like gestation, postmodernism and the months between an election and inauguration, the world is at one of those in-between moments. The lower tech world is nearly dust, but the brave new world has yet to fully take over. In terms of media and marketing, it is the moment, perhaps, when the old guard will need to adapt in order to avoid a digital age death sentence.

Notes from the Executive Director

September 1, 2010
We are busy with final preparations for the upcoming Privacy Academy, and I am very excited to let you know that in addition to FTC Bureau of Consumer Protection Director David Vladeck and European Parliamentarian Alexander Alvaro, media commentator Bob Garfield will join us to deliver a keynote address.

Practical strategies for creating a privacy culture in your organization

September 1, 2010
Some of the most common privacy breaches happen when personal information is stolen, lost or mistakenly disclosed. Most of these breaches could have been avoided if the individual involved simply thought about privacy before acting. What’s needed is an environment, or “culture,” where protecting clients’ privacy is top of mind for every employee whenever that person handles personal information—a privacy culture.

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