Posted in: EU Data Protection

Global News Roundup

France is receiving criticism for a new law expanding government agencies’ access to Internet data; a European Court of Justice advocate has deemed the data retention directive in violation of citizens’ fundamental privacy rights, and in the U.S., a petition to update the Electronic Communications Privacy Act has received more than 100,000 signatures. This week, Privacy Tracker reports on these developments as well as new administrative measures for Chinese credit reference agencies, U.S. states’ challenges to NSA surveillance and new fining powers for the Dutch data protection authority.

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Global News Roundup

From the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA), regulators are asserting themselves in consumer privacy issues. This Privacy Tracker weekly legislative roundup offers information on the FTC’s settlement with a flashlight app developer, as well as its plans for the upcoming year, and the Dutch DPA’s findings in its investigation of Google’s privacy policy. Meanwhile, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office announced that pending new pan-Europe legislation will result in significant budget losses, causing it to restructure; some are calling U.S. state attorneys general the most important privacy regulators in the country, and BC Information and Privacy Commissioner Elizabeth Denham is recommending the government amend the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

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Global News Roundup

In the U.S.,  FTC v. Wyndham  will decide whether the company’s “failure to safeguard personal information caused substantial consumer injury” and whether the FTC even has the authority to regulate data security; the GAO is pushing for comprehensive federal law governing the collection, use and sale of personal data by businesses, and Sen. Franken is calling for regulation over biometric data before the horse leaves the barn. In the EU, the debate over Safe Harbor continues, with Albrecht and Reding saying EU residents need to be able take data privacy complaints to U.S. courts. The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) has released the final set of Australian Privacy Principles that cover access to and correction of personal information, and in Canada learn about Alberta’s need to create a new Privacy Act and why Bill C-30 is back in the news. All this and more, in this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup.

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Global News Roundup

The Supreme Court of Canada, in a unanimous ruling, has determined that the Alberta privacy law is unconstitutional and has given the province one year to amend it; A federal judge in Vermont has ruled there can be no expectation of privacy when it comes to data exposed online via a peer-to-peer file-sharing network, and the New Zealand Parliament has voted down a bill that would have given the privacy commissioner increased powers. Meanwhile, the FTC has asserted its power over parental-consent methods, Brazil is calling for a crackdown on government surveillance and Italy’s data protection authority and intelligence department have entered into a cooperation protocol. This week’s Privacy Tracker roundup has these stories and more.

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Global News Roundup

In the U.S., guidelines and court rulings have offered insight on everything from drone use to workplace audio recordings, while, internationally, questions still loom about the future of Safe Harbor and national leaders have presented an Internet privacy resolution to the UN. Kazakhstan’s privacy law is scheduled to come into effect this month, and Indonesia is looking into consolidating its sectoral coverage into an overarching law. Also in this week’s roundup is analysis of India’s privacy bill, California’s spate of privacy laws and insight from the FTC and the New Jersey Attorney General’s Office on how to avoid the wrath of regulators.

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Global News Roundup

While much of the news was focused on the EU Data Protection Regulation this week, a few other things of note happened in the legal realm as well. For example, the EU Parliament adopted a resolution to suspend SWIFT based on allegations that the U.S. NSA had access to EU citizen’s bank data; the FTC reached a settlement with Aaron’s, Inc., over the company’s consumer spying regime, and in Ecuador there are concerns that a new penal code could violate citizens’ online privacy. These are just a few of the stories—in addition to information on the LIBE vote and the future of Safe Harbor and the EU regulation—in this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup.

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Global News Roundup

This week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup highlights changing privacy laws from the U.S. to Bahrain. Revisions to the U.S. Telephone Consumer Protection Act went into effect last week; the European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs will vote today on amendments to the proposed regulation and directive—including one that would see U.S. companies seeking permission from EU officials before complying with government access requests to EU data, and the Bahrain cabinet has preliminarily approved a data protection law. Meanwhile, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office is considering jail time for breaches at the same time as justifying its fining practices.

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The LIBE Vote on EU Data Protection: What, Exactly, Happens on Monday?

By Emily Leach, CIPP/US

The European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE) has scheduled votes on the reports on the revised data protection regulation and directive for Monday in Strasbourg. This post notes outlines the steps that come after Monday’s vote in order to create a new data protection law in the EU and offers insight into what EU privacy pros are saying about the likely outcome.

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global News Roundup

While U.S. regulators mull over the need for rules surrounding drone use by law enforcement, Montana’s new gun owner healthcare privacy law went into effect and California continues to shape privacy law moving toward a “presumption of harm” in breach cases, but one op-ed claims its “revenge porn” law doesn’t do enough. A Zimbabwean law established a central SIM card database, and Australia’s information commissioner has released a best practice guide for app developers. This weekly roundup offers information on all these issues and more, including what regulators had to say at both the IAPP Privacy Academy and the 35th International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners.

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Global News Roundup

This week, read about California’s continued push towards privacy protections including Gov. Jerry Brown signing into law an amendment to the California Online Privacy Protection Act that requires websites to disclose in privacy policies how they react to Do-Not-Track signals, the passing of the “eraser law” and movement on a bill that would extend the employee social media law to public agencies. Meanwhile, a Minnesota court has determined the state is not responsible for an employee’s alleged inappropriate accessing of driver’s license records, and the Fourth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled in favor of a former Virginia deputy sheriff saying his Facebook “Like” is protected by the First Amendment. Plus, read about legislative activity in the EU, Singapore, Australia and South Africa.

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