Contributor: Deirdre Mulligan

Deirdre K. Mulligan is an Assistant Professor at the School of Information at UC Berkeley, and a Faculty Director at the Berkeley Center for Law & Technology. Prior to joining the School of Information Mulligan was a Clinical Professor of Law and the founding Director of the Samuelson Law, Technology & Public Policy Clinic at the UC Berkeley School of Law. She is the policy lead for the NSF-funded TRUST Science and Technology Center, which brings together researchers at U.C. Berkeley, Carnegie-Mellon University, Cornell University, Stanford University, and Vanderbilt University. Prior to joining academia she served as staff counsel at the Center for Democracy & Technology in Washington, D.C. Mulligan’s current research agenda focuses on information privacy and security. Current projects include comparative, qualitative research to explore the conceptualization and management of privacy within corporations based in different jurisdictions and policy approaches to improving cybersecurity. Other areas of current research include exploring users' conceptions of privacy in the online environment and their relation to existing theories of privacy. She is chair of the board of directors of the Center for Democracy and Technology, and co-chair of Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing Academic Advisory Board.

Privacy on the Ground

The Modern Privacy Function: Balancing Strategy with the Operational

By Deirdre Mulligan

Note from the Editor:

This is the final of a series of three posts on privacy officers in the U.S. and Europe from Berkeley Profs. Kenneth Bamberger and Deirdre Mulligan. Bamberger will discuss his research in the breakout session Dubunking Myths of European and U.S. Privacy: New Data on Corporate Privacy Management at the IAPP Data Protection Intensive, April 23-25 in London, UK.

Our previous posts reported some initial conclusions from almost one hundred interviews of leading corporate privacy officers, regulators and other privacy professionals in five countries. 

The second post explored one surprising finding—that the two countries in which privacy officers were most empowered were Germany and the United States, countries which couldn’t be more different in terms of...

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Privacy on the Ground

Why Are German and U.S. Practices so Similar, if Their Regulatory Structures Are so Different?

By Deirdre Mulligan

Note from the Editor:

This is the second in a series of three posts on privacy officers in the U.S. and Europe from Berkeley Profs. Kenneth Bamberger and Deirdre Mulligan. They discussed some of their findings in the breakout session Privacy on the Ground in the U.S. and Europe, March 7, at the IAPP Global Privacy Summit in Washington, DC.

Our previous post began to explore findings from almost one hundred interviews of leading corporate privacy officers, regulators and other privacy professionals in five countries—and what they can teach us about how the structure of the corporate privacy function can affect the success of measures to protect privacy.

We ended that post with a surprising finding: The two countries in which privacy...

More from Deirdre Mulligan
Privacy on the Ground

Operationalizing Privacy: How Empowered Is Your Privacy Office?

By Deirdre Mulligan

Note from the Editor:

This is the first in a series of three posts on privacy officers in the U.S. and Europe from Berkeley Profs. Kenneth Bamberger and Deirdre Mulligan. They discussed some of their findings in the breakout session Privacy on the Ground in the U.S. and Europe, March 7, at the IAPP Global Privacy Summit in Washington, DC.

Where should privacy professionals be positioned within the organization? 

What level of independence and authority do privacy officers need so that they can embed a value as complicated as privacy—at times in tension with a whole host of bottom-line commitments, from identifying terrorists to placing effective ads —into a complex organization? 

And if privacy is to be delivered through designs...

More from Deirdre Mulligan