Opinion

Getting Practical and Thinking Ahead: “Interoperability” Is Gaining Momentum

In a world of disparate privacy regimes, pragmatic privacy professionals, experts and regulators have in recent years championed “interoperability” as the way forward for providing consistent privacy protections for global data flows. Of course, many in the privacy and data protection community continue to pursue the ideal of a global privacy standard and have made various recommendations to that effect over the years. Witness the recent “Resolution on anchoring data protection and the protection of privacy in international law” adopted by the International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners in Warsaw, Poland, last September.

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Opinion

How Will Obama’s NSA Plans Impact European Data Protection Requirements?

By Eduardo Ustaran, CIPP/E

The recently revealed plans by President Barack Obama to reform the way in which the U.S. intelligence services gather and use data throughout the world have had a lukewarm reception by European politicians. The rhetoric by members of the European Parliament in particular suggests that Obama’s proposed reforms stopped short of what would have been comforting enough for them. Such reforms are a work in progress that will extend over months and years, but Obama’s stance is bound to have a very direct effect on existing and forthcoming EU data protection requirements.

More from Eduardo Ustaran

Opinion

The Questionable Legality and Practicality of the EU’s Proposed “Anti-FISA” Clause

As it has been noted on these pages one of the tangible results of the Snowden revelations has been the (re)introduction of a provision in the EU’s proposed General Data Protection Regulation aiming to limit and control the transfer of personal data to authorities in third countries, the main concern motivating this initiative clearly being concerns regarding the transfer of personal data to U.S. intelligence and law enforcement authorities.

Originally, the European Commission had intended for such a provision to be included in Article 42 of the data protection reform proposal tabled in January 2012, but—if one chooses to believe the many press reports one the matter—due to intense lobbying pressure from the U.S. government, the provision was removed. That is, of course, not the full picture.

Opinion

The Plain Truth About Safe Harbor

By Eduardo Ustaran, CIPP/E
The European Commission

The stance adopted by the European Commission in the report on the functioning of Safe Harbor published today was probably one of the worst kept secrets of the privacy world. It was patently obvious to anyone close enough to the controversy around the ability of Safe Harbor to live up to the expectations of EU policy makers and regulators that the Commission would be critical about it but would stop short of delivering a fatal blow to the scheme.

More from Eduardo Ustaran

Opinion

Has the LIBE Committee Torpedoed the Safe Harbor?

The committee of the European Parliament charged with shepherding the proposed EU Data Protection Regulation—the LIBE Committee—finally has reported out an amended version of the Regulation. And despite the fact that a Commission-initiated review of the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor is pending, it appears the LIBE Committee effectively has called for the end of the Safe Harbor.

More from Christopher Wolf