Canada Dashboard Digest

Are you sick of hearing about Heartbleed? If you are, you may want to skip some of the stories profiled in this week’s Dashboard Digest. If, however, you are like me, you might still be confused by the array of stories about the technical vulnerability, how it works and what damage it might have caused. I had to do a fair amount of self-study this week to prepare for an on-air interview with the CBC, and I must admit that the more I read about it, the more questions I had.

One thing is for sure: We work in an increasingly dynamic industry where things change faster than ever. What was once considered secure is actually not. Safeguards that you thought were good enough, aren't. I suppose that’s all the more reason the privacy professional needs tools like the Dashboard Digest—to try and stay on top of what’s going on.

With respect to the Heartbleed saga, we felt that you deserved even more opportunity to learn about it, so we have added a session to this year’s Symposium that promises to educate privacy professionals on exactly what they need to know about the vulnerability. I hope you can make it to Toronto if you're keen to learn more.

Somewhat overshadowed by Heartbleed were two rather significant decisions from Commissioners Denham and Cavoukian. Read on to learn more because these, too, are important events. 

Have a great weekend, and happy (Easter egg) hunting!

Kris Klein
Managing Director
IAPP Canada

Top Canadian Privacy News

DATA LOSS

Privacy Commissioner to Investigate Breach (April 29, 2011)

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner (OPC) is looking into the Sony PlayStation Network data breach that has affected up to 77 million users, reports the Financial Post. A spokesperson for the OPC expressed concern that the company did not promptly notify its customers about the breach and said that the office will move forward once it has a "full understanding of the incident." Meanwhile, Sony has announced that credit card information was encrypted. Alberta Privacy Commissioner Frank Work is also looking into the matter and has warned users that they should change their online passwords. According to one report, this latest data breach "is one of the top five ever."
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DATA PROTECTION

Commissioner and Utility Cooperating on Smart Meters (April 29, 2011)

The Globe and Mail reports that BC's privacy commissioner is working with utility company BC Hydro to ensure that privacy is protected as smart meters are rolled out. Smart meters will track consumers' energy usage data and report it back to the utility on an hourly basis. Advocacy groups have questioned how that data could be used and who besides the utility may seek access to it--such as divorce lawyers, law enforcement or insurance companies who may want to gain a "snapshot of people's behavior." A spokeswoman for BC Privacy Commissioner Elizabeth Denham said the office is working with BC Hydro to consider smart meters' possible impacts.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Experts Not Surprised By Smartphone Privacy Threats (April 29, 2011)

Security experts are not surprised by the privacy threats that exist in smartphones, according to the Toronto Star. Telecommunications companies have long been able to remotely access the locations of phones, but with the right tools, anyone can access private information including texts, photos, social networking posts and other location-based data, the article states. The director of Consumer Watchdog's Privacy Project points out that "there really needs to be an educational process started so that people will begin to understand" that a "gold mine of data about their life exists inside their smartphone."
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ONLINE PRIVACY

McQuay Discusses Demonstrating Accountability (April 29, 2011)

In this Daily Dashboard Q&A, Nymity President Terry McQuay discusses the renewed look at accountability as it applies to data privacy. McQuay says accountability involves organizations being "responsible for personal information" and able to "account for it" within the organization when it flows to business partners by demonstrating the status of their privacy program to internal stakeholders. McQuay says there are three main organizational drivers for accountability, and he discusses accountability-related developments in the legislative and regulatory communities. McQuay will talk more about "demonstrating accountability" at next week's IAPP Canada Privacy Symposium.
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PRIVACY LAW

Opinion: USA PATRIOT Act Affects Canadian Citizens’ Privacy (April 29, 2011)

In a series of posts on ZDNet, journalist Zack Whittaker examines how the USA PATRIOT Act affects businesses, citizens and governments outside of the U.S.--particularly in Canada. Whittaker points out that the U.S. legislation covers data that is housed in or passes through U.S.-owned companies, thereby making it vulnerable to interception by authorities, which can be at odds with Canadian legislation covering cross-border data movement. Many online services, including those made available by the cloud, are provided by U.S.-based organizations. "The issue many Canadians face with the PATRIOT Act," Whittaker says, "lies in their recognizing it as a foreign piece of law which allows a foreign government to access their personal data for the benefit of the U.S."
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Web Standards Group Discusses Do Not Track (April 29, 2011)

The Web standards organization, World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), met this week to examine online privacy and the main issues surrounding a universal do-not-track mechanism, reports MediaPost. Discussion topics included definitions for do not track and the mechanism's operational feasibility. Nearly 60 position papers were submitted by Web companies, academics and others prior to the conference. W3C Co-Chair Lorrie Cranor said the group "has not yet formally taken on the task of formalising do not track or any of the other consumer protection technologies in the tracking space but are looking at it and trying to determine if there's a role for them and, if so, what direction to go in."
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GEO PRIVACY

Jobs: Mistakes Were Made, But Users Not Tracked (April 28, 2011)

Apple CEO Steve Jobs has responded to recent reports that iPhone and iPad devices were tracking users' locations, The New York Times reports. Mistakes were made in how location data was handled, Jobs said, but stressed, "We haven't been tracking anybody. Never have. Never will." Apple has stated that the anonymous data was used to help the phone find its location in regions with weak GPS, and a software update will released to encrypt such data and limit its storage to seven days. Meanwhile, experts are calling for more transparency in how smartphones handle location information; data protection authorities across the globe have opened investigations, and a hearing before a U.S. Senate subcommittee has been scheduled for May 10. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Social Network Plans Internet Erasure (April 28, 2011)

In the midst of ongoing calls for a "right to be forgotten" on the Internet, an early social network has announced it will erase old posts and photos from its site. In a column for technology review, David Zax explores the push for an Internet "written in pencil," where users may remove information. The owners of Friendster, which predated such social networks as MySpace and Facebook, appear to be doing just that, having notified users that they plan to "wipe out the site's trove of digital memories, including ancient dorm-room photos, late-night blog entries and heartfelt friend endorsements," The New York Times reports. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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DATA PROTECTION

Opinion: PR Damage Not Enough to Incite Action? (April 28, 2011)

There seem to be few repercussions for companies that lose customers' sensitive data, opines Nick Bilton in The New York Times. Breach reports are on the rise, and customers continue to hand over their information for access to online services. And yet, "the only real hit a company takes when these data breaches happen is to the company's image," Bilton writes. "It seems that with the frequency these events happen, a simple PR hit is not working to force these companies to protect people's privacy." Bilton says the problem will only get worse with the advent of the cloud. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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GEO PRIVACY

Expert Calls for OPC Investigation Into iPhone Tracking (April 22, 2011)

Researchers have found that Apple's iPhone and 3G-enabled iPad began logging users' locations in hidden files a year ago, when Apple updated its mobile operating system. The data is usually unencrypted and can be copied to computers, the researchers found. Michael Geist, a member of the privacy commissioner's expert advisory panel, is calling for the Office of the Privacy Commissioner to open an investigation, calling the revelation "incredibly disturbing," The Victoria Times Colonist reports. While EU authorities are assessing the potential impact, and two U.S. legislators have written to Apple seeking an explanation, a Canadian software developer has announced the creation of a program to remove location history from such devices.
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HEALTHCARE PRIVACY

Dumped Medical Files Prompt Official Advisory (April 22, 2011)

Saskatchewan Information and Privacy Commissioner Gary Dickson has sent an advisory to the province's healthcare providers with eight recommendations to ensure they are in compliance with the Health Information and Protection Act (HIPA), according to The StarPhoenix. "We have a systematic problem with healthcare providers not understanding HIPA and not following the requirements," said Dickson. The advisory comes in response to a number of cases where medical files have been found in dumpsters in Saskatoon and Regina. Justice Minister Don Morgan expressed concern over the improperly discarded files and warned of a rise in prosecutions of health privacy law violations.
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DATA LOSS

Lost Memory Stick Contained PHI (April 22, 2011)

An unencrypted memory stick containing the records of 4,500 children has gone missing from a speech and hearing clinic at the University of Western Ontario, according to the London Free Press. The missing records include names, addresses, phone numbers, birthdates, doctor information and school and childcare information. Ontario Information and Privacy Commissioner Ann Cavoukian said, "If you are a healthcare facility of any kind, you never transfer identifiable data onto a portable device such as a USB or a laptop." Prof. Richard H. Irving, who specializes in health systems management, warns of the growing risk as information-holding devices become smaller, saying, "Once you put information on a little key...it's easier to lose it and it's easier to steal it."
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STUDENT PRIVACY

After OIPC Approval, Survey Has Begun (April 22, 2011)

Following the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario (OIPC) decision last month on an Ottawa-Carleton District School Board survey, the Ottawa Citizen reports on the survey's launch this week, continuing through May 20. The survey, which includes questions on such topics as home life, religious beliefs and sexual orientation, raised concerns about student privacy. Students may choose to skip questions on the survey, which is confidential but not anonymous, the report states. The OIPC released a report in March stating that although the survey does request personal information, the collection is permissible because it is "necessary to the proper administration of a lawfully authorized activity."
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BIOMETRICS

OLG Says Gambling Program Will Protect Privacy (April 22, 2011)

The Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corp. (OLG) says its new "Voluntary Self-Exclusion" facial recognition program, announced last year, will not violate gamblers' privacy, reports ITWorld Canada. The program aims to help those with a self-identified gambling problem to stop gambling by cross-referencing images of people entering OLG casinos with a database of people who have put themselves on a list banning them from the casinos. Paul Pellizari, the OLG's director of policy and social responsibility, says unless the system recognizes a face as being in the database, the image is automatically deleted. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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INFORMATION ACCESS

OIPC: Do Not Shred Files (April 22, 2011)

Ontario Information and Privacy Commissioner Ann Cavoukian is speaking out against a Toronto-based law firm's recommendation that Ontario hospitals "cleanse" their files of "anything that might embarrass them before the public gets the right in January to ask for the information," the London Free Press reports. "I was astounded at the language. Just using the word 'cleansing' is highly inappropriate. It suggests shredding, eliminating, hiding--getting rid of material before the end of the year," Cavoukian said. Ontario Health Minister Deb Matthews also spoke out against any action contrary to the "spirit of the legislation," the report states.
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DATA PROTECTION

Poll: 67 Percent of PCI-Regulated Companies Not Compliant (April 21, 2011)

In a survey conducted by the Ponemon Institute, 67 percent of PCI-regulated companies lack full compliance with the standard; 50 percent of security professionals view PCI as a burden, and 59 percent do not believe it helps with security, reports InformationWeek. The survey also found an increase in the number of data breaches since 2009, with non-PCI compliant companies experiencing more data breaches than PCI-compliant ones. The study found little connection between PCI-related expenditures and compliance levels. Imperva's director of security strategy noted, "In a somewhat counterintuitive manner, those organizations (that) suffered no breaches are not necessarily those who spent the biggest budget."
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DATA PROTECTION

IT Study Reveals Same Challenges, Accelerated Pace (April 21, 2011)

A survey of 2,400 IT security specialists from around the world shows compliance, governance and information security management at the top of their priorities for the remainder of 2011, reports InfoSecurity. The study, conducted by not-for-profit IT security association ISACA, found that the complexities of the IT landscape are accelerating due to new technologies and regulations as well as an increase in data breaches. Tony Noble, a member of ISACA's guidance and practice committee, notes that this year's survey shows a need to better align "business with IT to unlock greater value," adding that there's a perception on the business side of organizations that "IT is managed in a silo."
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HEALTHCARE PRIVACY

Drug Manufacturer Alerts Consumers of Breaches (April 19, 2011)

The Wall Street Journal reports that, as a result of the recent Epsilon data breach, GlaxoSmithKlein has warned consumers in a letter that their e-mail addresses and names "were accessed by an unauthorized third party." The company makes drugs for asthma, HIV, depression and smoking cessation, among others. The breach may have exposed which product sites consumers are registered for, according to the company, which could help fraudsters discern what prescription drugs they take, warns CAUCE, a spam coalition. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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DATA RETENTION

Company Extends Retention Term (April 19, 2011)

Yahoo disclosed on Friday that it will extend the length of the term it retains user data to 18 months, The New York Times reports. In a company blog post, Yahoo Chief Trust Officer Anne Toth said, "we will keep our log file data longer than we have been--offering consumers a more robust individualized experience--while we continue our innovation in the areas of transparency and choice to protect privacy." The company's current retention term is 90 days. Privacy advocates expressed disappointment about the change, and, the report states, "Yahoo's new policy may be in conflict with European Union data protection rules." (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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DATA LOSS

Sensitive Data Compromised in Blog Host’s Breach (April 15, 2011)

A host site for more than 19 million blogs has announced a data breach. WordPress.com says sensitive data was likely taken after its source code was exposed and copied. "We don't have any specific suggestions for our users beyond reiterating these security fundamentals," founder Matt Mullenwed said. "Use a strong password, meaning something random with numbers and punctuation; use different passwords for different sites; if you have used the same password on different sites, switch it to something more secure." The company will continue to investigate the breach, Security News Daily reports.
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EMPLOYEE PRIVACY

Experts: Monitoring Solves Some Problems, Creates More (April 15, 2011)

The Globe and Mail reports on employers using technology to monitor their employees' online activities at work and the views of some privacy experts that such monitoring can cause more problems than it solves. A recent survey of Human Resources Professionals Association member companies found that 55 percent monitor their employees' Web usage during work hours, while 60 percent have developed a social media policy. Citing multiple rulings that have granted employees "some amount of privacy in the workplace," one expert recommends that companies create written policies about monitoring tools and practices and have their employees sign off on those policies annually.
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PRIVACY LAW

Court Rules License Plates Not PII (April 15, 2011)

A divided Alberta Court of Appeals recently ruled that license plates are not personally identifiable information, "sending shockwaves through the Canadian privacy community," the Ottawa Citizen reports. The ruling came after an Alberta resident was asked for her driver's license and license plate while picking up furniture at a store in 2006. The majority of the court concluded that while a person's driver's license is personal information, a license plate is not. An appeal to the ruling seems likely, the report states, but "the final outcome of this case carries significant legal implications for privacy protection in Canada, particularly for online activities that raise many of the same issues."
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PRIVACY LAW

Opinion: Lawful Access Bill Would Erode Civil Liberties (April 15, 2011)

In a Macleans.ca editorial, Jesse Brown says a bill that would expand police powers over Canadians' personal information is cause for concern. The "lawful access" crime bill would grant police access to personal data via Internet service providers without a warrant. Last month, Privacy Commissioner Jennifer Stoddart and the country's provincial privacy commissioners sent a letter to the government expressing concerns about the bill and calling it problematic. The commissioners wrote that there was insufficient justification for the bill and asked for less-intrusive ways to fight crime. "It's a promise to do significant damage to the civil liberties of every Canadian," writes Brown.
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DATA LOSS

School Board Loses Data on 7,000 Employees (April 15, 2011)

CBC reports that the private information of about 7,000 Edmonton Public School Board employees has gone missing. A USB memory stick containing information including resumes, banking data and employment records was lost on March 22 by a computer technician. The school board has alerted the individuals affected and informed them of how to monitor their credit. Alberta Privacy Commissioner Frank Work said the school board policy indicates unencrypted memory sticks are not to be used. The policy also requires that the board keep a list of data stored on portable devices. "The third way they breached their own policy was they had kept too much information too long," Work said.
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PRIVACY—CANADA

OPC Investigating Allegations Against Postal Service (April 13, 2011)

The daughter of the victim of mail scams is raising concerns with the federal privacy commissioner about Canada's postal service, CBC reports. The woman says Canada Post sold her 84-year-old father's new mailing address to companies that update addresses in a federal database after his address was changed to avoid marketing scams. The database--containing thousands of new addresses--is accessible to 37 companies for a $10,000 charge each. Those companies update address lists for marketers. Canada Post "should not under any circumstances be selling personal information," the woman said. Canada Post says it offers an opt-out box to customers on its address change form. Privacy Commissioner Jennifer Stoddart is investigating.
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PRIVACY

Is Self-Regulation Realistic? (April 13, 2011)

The Wall Street Journal uses the example of catalog mailers to examine whether companies should self-regulate on privacy. Catalog Choice, a Web site that aims to give users choice over the sharing of their personal information, allows users to choose which mailing lists they'd like to opt out of and reports that 95 percent of catalog companies honor users' requests. But some catalog companies say they don't work with any third parties and aren't required to belong to such organizations, the report states. Chris Hoofnagle of the University of California Berkeley, who advises the company on legal matters, explains "the organization is legally an 'agent' for people requesting opt-outs." (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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PRIVACY LAW—CANADA

Judge Dismisses Facebook Lawsuit (April 12, 2011)

Quebec Superior Court has dismissed a class-action lawsuit against Facebook. Judge Michel Déziel refused to authorize certification of the lawsuit, filed in July 2010 by Merchant Law Group in Toronto, which claimed that Facebook breached the privacy of its users, All Facebook reports. The suit also claimed that Facebook's altered privacy rules misappropriated users' personal information, enabling behavioral targeting, the report states. Déziel wrote that "Quebec courts do not have jurisdiction on the litigation because all the users of Facebook accepted, while joining itself to the site, to submit all the eventual recourses to the Californian courts of the district of Santa Clara."
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ONLINE PRIVACY

What Happens to Your Digital Life After Death? (April 11, 2011)

All Things Digital explores the question "Who will be reading your e-mail after you die?" in a feature on a new startup aimed at letting users decide. Michael Aiello, founder of LifeEnsured, explains, "We want people to think about what their virtual life is and what it means to them and their families and how they want to be perceived after they pass away." Besides deleting social network accounts or entries on online dating sites, options include moving photos stored in online servers into the public domain and sending final e-mails. And whatever end-of-life options LifeEnsured users may choose, Aiello says, "We put all the requests for our paying members in irrevocable trust."
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DATA LOSS

Canadian Consumers Among Victims of E-mail Breach (April 8, 2011)

As the fallout from the recent Epsilon data breach continues, The Vancouver Sun reports on the impact for Canadian consumers. In addition to a lengthy list of high-profile companies, the report notes the breach has affected The College Board, which administers exams taken by many Canadian students. Meanwhile, Forrester Research Analyst Dave Frankland told eWEEK that the effects of this breach reach farther than the company's client base, saying the breach calls into question the security of data in a cloud-computing environment.
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FINANCIAL PRIVACY

Expert: Be Wary of Phishing Scams During Tax Season (April 8, 2011)

Tax-related phishing scams have increased in recent months, with 48 percent of malicious mail including tax-related phishing scams as of late March, ITWorld Canada reports. "Phishing utilizes timely events to increase the likelihood of catching targets and information; during tax season it's tax phishing, during election season its election phishing," said James Quin of Ontario's Info-Tech Research Group. Recipients of tax-related phishing e-mails should be on the lookout for requests for credit card information, the report states, and "know it is a scam if it asks for credit card info because the government does not give out rebates in that fashion."
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Miss Manners: Teach the Children Well (April 8, 2011)

Even Miss Manners is weighing in on data privacy concerns. In The Washington Post last week, a reader describes a video chat where a beloved niece "was snapping pictures of me using her computer's camera and was posting them on Facebook." The reader seeks advice on what to do about this younger relative's handling of digital data, asking, "perhaps I need to get with it and be prepared for my close-up at all times?" Miss Manners advises the reader to explain the concept of privacy to the young relative "not only for your protection but for hers." (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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ONLINE PRIVACY

“G-8 du Web” Planned (April 8, 2011)

Data privacy concerns continue to demand the attention of world leaders. More details have emerged about plans to include Internet privacy on the agenda of the Group of 8 summit in France this year. The New York Times reports that French President Nicolas Sarkozy has enlisted a longtime advertising industry executive to help "organize a gathering of policy makers and Internet company executives" for a "first-of-its-kind meeting, dubbed 'G-8 du Web,'" to coincide with the G-8 summit, which takes place in Deauville, France, in May. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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PRIVACY LAW

Condé Nast Targeted in Phishing Scam (April 8, 2011)

The ABA Journal reports that magazine publisher Condé Nast was recently duped in a spear-phishing scheme and is suing to recover the funds that the scammers attempted to steal. The publisher received a fraudulent e-mail that appeared to come from its regular printing house asking for payment to be sent to a new address. Relying on this e-mail, the company sent its $8 million payment to the new address. The publisher was alerted to the scam by its printing house and froze the funds, which were still in the recipients' account. This news comes amid high-level concerns that customers affected by the recent data breach at e-mail marketer Epsilon will fall victim to similar spear-phishing campaigns.
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PERSONAL PRIVACY

Samsung: Keylogging Accusations False (April 8, 2011)

Samsung has refuted claims that some of its laptops came loaded with a keylogger. The statement follows an internal investigation launched by Samsung after a report claiming that the spyware was installed on two of its models. The report was based on a security consultant's findings after he had performed a series of virus scans, Digital Trends reports. The keylogging software is publicly available. It records computer users' keystrokes and can send information to a third party without the users' knowledge, the report states. An additional, independent investigation confirmed that the keylogging finding was false.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Reputation Managers Striving for Internet Amnesia (April 8, 2011)

A report in The New York Times on efforts to make the Internet forget likens the proliferation of personal information online to "a metastasized cancer" that has "embedded itself into the nether reaches of cyberspace, etched into archives, algorithms and a web of hyperlinks." More often, people from all walks of life are turning to online reputation managers that focus on improving their clients' Internet images through such techniques as removing negative posts and burying unfavorable search results. "The Internet has become the go-to resource to destroy someone's life online," the head of one reputation management company put it, adding the result is that life offline is turned upside-down as well. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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PRIVACY LAW

Landmark Case Raises Issues for Employers (April 1, 2011)

The ruling in what is being called a landmark privacy case involving a teacher charged with storing inappropriate material on his work-issued computer is likely to have far-reaching implications for the personal use of company equipment, The Vancouver Sun reports. The Ontario Court of Appeal has ruled that while school officials could access the computer, police violated Richard Cole's rights by searching it without a warrant because he had permission to use it during weekends and vacations and to store personal information on it. Questions abound now, the report states, as to "what it will mean to workers and their employers in an environment that is increasingly reliant on portable technology to do the job."
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EMPLOYEE PRIVACY

Judge Recommends Health Disclosures for Bus Drivers (April 1, 2011)

Regardless of privacy concerns, school bus drivers should be mandated to undergo physical and mental health exams and report all conditions to their employers. That's the message from Judge Bruce Fraser following an inquest into a crash that resulted in the death of a nine-year-old girl, The Globe and Mail reports. Among the recommendations in the inquest report released on Thursday include random drug testing, mental health reporting, medication use disclosure and full medical disclosure. Although he acknowledged the potential privacy concerns associated with such requirements, "the protection of our children, our richest resource, trumps any such rights," Fraser said.
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PRIVACY LAW

Former Employee Sues City (April 1, 2011)

A former Saskatoon employee has brought a privacy suit against the city and several officials alleging improper disclosure of her utility bill information to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), The StarPhoenix reports, and attorneys are calling for a dismissal. The plaintiff has cited a 2010 report from Saskatchewan Information and Privacy Commissioner Gary Dickson that found the city breached her privacy several years earlier. "We have only the city's bare assertion that CRA was seeking to collect personal information for the purpose of administering or enforcing a tax law," Dickson wrote, noting the city also provided more information to the CRA than necessary, which "clearly constitutes a breach of the complainant's privacy."
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DATA LOSS

Opinion: More Must Be Done To Protect Privacy (April 1, 2011)

Saskatchewan's provincial government must do more to protect privacy, The Regina Leader-Post contends in a recent editorial sparked by a lack of prosecutions in a wave of data breaches over the past seven years. On the same day, The StarPhoenix referenced a recent incident where Information and Privacy Commissioner Gary Dickson and members of his office reclaimed boxes of personal medical records thrown into a dumpster, calling for the government and medical professionals to do more to protect patient privacy. Breaches of such personal information have not resulted in strong disciplinary action, which Dickson suggests "really minimizes what I think is a much more serious matter."
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CHILDREN’S PRIVACY

Questions Arise Over Parents’ Online Postings (April 1, 2011)

The Canadian Press explores several recent instances of "viral videos" on sites like YouTube and across the Internet--some with stars as young as a few months old--in examining whether future privacy implications exist. Some experts are urging parents to use caution as many ethical and privacy questions remain, the report states. As Indiana University Prof. Hans Ibold put it, "The sort of boundaries that we've had before with older media are changing and a lot of people assume now that anything goes, that nothing is private anymore. I think it will take some time to figure it out."
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PERSONAL PRIVACY

Smart Grid Carries Risks (April 1, 2011)

The smart grid aims to provide the ability to monitor and control power usage remotely as well as to allow customers to feed their own wind, solar and biomass power back into the system, CBC reports, but privacy concerns persist. Governments hope the exchange of information about hourly power usage between the consumer and the utility will help to reduce energy consumption. However, the impending grid solution brings with it privacy risks. The grid is able to reveal to utilities more detailed information about consumers' personal habits than ever before based on energy usage data, which Ontario's privacy commissioner has expressed concerns about. Cyber attacks are also a danger.
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