ANZ Dashboard Digest

Putting its regard for privacy compliance to the fore, the iappANZ Board has this week taken the decision to opt in to the obligations of the new privacy legislation. You will see our new privacy policy, and we welcome any comments as it has been a collaborative effort by some of Australia’s finest privacy minds. We understand that the privacy commissioner will be talking about ways to improve organisations’ privacy policies at the OAIC Privacy Awareness Week Breakfast, so if you are revising yours, it is an event not to be missed. In news this week you will also see that AMSRO has also applied to register a non-mandatory code of practice.

Now that 12 March is over, we are starting to see less of the doomsday reports and more of the innovation which the OAIC encourages. We expect plenty of new ideas in Privacy Awareness Week in May. We are delighted to confirm that the deputy chair of the ACMA will be joining the ALRC and OAIC representatives in our Great Debate on Australia’s direction on serious invasion of privacy in the digital age.

The article by Brenda Aynsley OAM this week, “Sharing the Values to match the technology,” presents a fascinating counterpoint to the call by Tim Berners-Lee and the World Wide Web consortium in their “Web We Want Campaign.” Aynsley examines the important distinction between “trusted” providers and “trustworthy” providers. Trustworthiness is critical because technology projects continue to have one of the highest rates of failure—failure to deliver on promises, on time, on budget—or all three. Risks such as those presented internationally by Heartbleed or the CDA security breach, which threatens the Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record, mean that the concept of trustworthy will become increasingly significant for privacy professionals that either develop or procure technology. Then, of course, as the story on the use of biometric facial recognition technology in Japan shows, trustworthiness in the party deploying the technology is vital. It will be interesting to hear from Tim Rains on trustworthy computing in Privacy Awareness Week. Hope to meet you there.

Emma Hossack
President
IAPP ANZ

Top Australia and New Zealand Privacy News

ONLINE PRIVACY

Dennedy Offers Tips for Consumers (March 29, 2013)

Noting the uptick in victims of cyber attacks and the huge increase in the number of malicious smartphone applications identified last year, McAfee Chief Privacy Officer Michelle Dennedy, CIPP/US, writes for The Huffington Post about online threats to consumers. “Most consumers assume that the websites they frequent have top-notch cybersecurity and privacy controls. Rather than assume, users should do some simple investigating on the security of these sites,” Dennedy writes, offering the following tips to consumers: Change passwords often, read privacy settings and licensing agreements, avoid public or open WiFi and practice safe surfing.
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DATA LOSS—U.S. & NEW ZEALAND

EQC Ordered To Shut Down IT Systems After Breaches (March 28, 2013)

Earthquake Commission (EQC) Chief Executive Ian Simpson has offered to resign over a massive privacy breach in which an EQC staffer sent a spreadsheet containing details on nearly 10,000 claims to a third party, Stuff.co.nz reports. And after finding that a second e-mail was sent containing the personal details of claimants, this time including names and bank account details, Earthquake Minister Gerry Brownlee ordered the commission to shut down a number of its computer systems. Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff says she is considering writing to public-sector CEOs in an effort to prevent future breaches. “We hope that agencies are starting to realize that they should have stronger controls in place,” Shroff said. “But they clearly have a way to go yet."
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DATA RETENTION—AUSTRALIA

Newly Revealed Documents Show Government Split (March 28, 2013)

The federal government’s proposed data retention policy continues to bring debate, as newly released documents reveal disagreement among government agencies, reports Australian Financial Review. While telecommunications companies maintain the proposal would be extremely costly, the ASIO and federal police say a long-term data retention policy is necessary to conduct investigations. However, documents reveal the Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy only supported a six-month retention of data and that information necessary for business purposes. According to a spokesman for Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus, all options remain on the table pending the joint committee’s findings, the report states.
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DATA PROTECTION—AUSTRALIA

Data Breach Consequences Can Be Severe (March 28, 2013)

Data breaches have far-reaching implications including reputational damage, loss of consumer trust and financial costs, reports Computerworld Australia. Though companies are not required to report data breaches, Australian companies Telstra and Dell Australia have been investigated for data breaches by Privacy Commissioner Timothy Pilgrim in the past two years and found to be violating multiple National Privacy Principles. Beyond the effect on companies themselves, data breaches can have vast consequences for customers. “The implications for customers are that if their personal data is lost, someone else may try to create a false identity using their name,” said one expert.
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PRIVACY LAW—AUSTRALIA

Opinion: Government Indecisive on Privacy Tort (March 28, 2013)

The Australian Law Reform Commission recommended in 2008 that Australians “should be able to seek compensation for serious invasions of their privacy,” writes George Williams for the Sydney Morning Herald. Still, the government has not advanced the creation of a privacy tort and has again referred the matter for an inquiry requiring that the commission revisit its work. Williams urges Parliament to act, saying, “The law should provide a remedy for, and a deterrent against, a person or business breaching our privacy for commercial gain or acting negligently so as to expose our personal information and financial details to criminals.”
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INFORMATION ACCESS—HONG KONG

Gov’t Shelves Companies Ordinance (March 28, 2013)

The Bangkok Post reports that the Hong Kong government has shelved the Companies Ordinance, which would have restricted access to information about company directors, including their home addresses. The ordinance has been highly contested by journalists and others claiming it infringed on press rights and transparency. "We hope to give more room for the community to reach a consensus," said a Financial Services and the Treasury Bureau spokeswoman. In South China Morning Post, Dieter Yih, president of the Law Society, noted that the current debate over “the right of access to information balanced against the desire for personal privacy” was not considered when the society drafted the ordinance, and recommended the government conduct a further consultation on this point.
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MOBILE PRIVACY—HONG KONG

Providers Brace for Law’s Implementation (March 28, 2013)

South China Morning Post reports on mobile phone service providers’ rush to collect personal data before a new law takes effect April 1 that will place more stringent restrictions on direct-sales practices. At least three providers have changed their privacy practices ahead of changes to the Personal Data (Privacy) Ordinance, which will penalise offenders with fines of up to HK$500,000 and up to three years in jail, the report states. The new law requires customers to opt in to direct marketing campaigns.
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DATA PROTECTION—ASIA PACIFIC & EU

EU and APEC Working Towards Data Transfer System (March 27, 2013)

Hunton & Williams’ Privacy and Information Security Law Blog reports on the Article 29 Working Party’s (WP29) press release outlining efforts made to promote cooperation between EU and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation group (APEC) data transfer systems. A joint EU-APEC committee has been comparing the EU’s binding corporate rules framework and APEC Cross-Border Privacy Rules with a goal of creating “practical tools, including a common referential, for those multinational companies that have data collection and/or processing-related activities in both the European Union and APEC region,” the press release states. The WP29 and APEC are expected to adopt a roadmap in the coming months in order to continue their work in this area.
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GEO PRIVACY

Report: Location Data Creates “Fundamental Constraints” on Privacy (March 26, 2013)
BBC News reports on a new study revealing that patterns of human movement are predictable enough to identify a specific smartphone user from four data points. The Scientific Reports study analyzed 15 months of human mobility data on 1.5 million users. In an age of ubiquitous mobile phone usage, aggregated datasets are coveted by advertisers, help map emergency services and fuel a new generation of social scientists. The report concludes, however, that “even coarse datasets provide little anonymity” to users. “These findings represent fundamental constraints to an individual’s privacy and have important implications for the design of frameworks and institutions dedicated to protect the privacy of individuals,” the study states.

DATA PROTECTION

Westerman: Privacy Pros Need To Be Trust Pros (March 26, 2013)

In the first in a series of blog posts for the IAPP’s Privacy Perspectives, Create With Context CEO Ilana Westerman writes, “Businesses should stop focusing on privacy and start focusing on trust” and notes that fostering trust “will create value and revenue” for companies. Privacy professionals should become trust professionals, she notes, adding, “Privacy and trust are two sides of the same coin but lie at opposite ends of the emotional spectrum.”
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BIG DATA

Opinion: Is Anonymization Possible? If Not, Then What? (March 26, 2013)

Anonymization is intended to allow businesses to collect and use huge amounts of information while minimizing risks to consumers if, for example, a developer’s database gets hacked. But some studies say true anonymization is not possible. David Meyer opines in GigaOM that this level of data collection is not going to stop, “so we need to develop workable guidelines for protecting people. Those developing data-centric products also have to start thinking responsibly—and so do the privacy brigade. Neither camp will entirely get its way: There will be greater regulation of data privacy, one way or another, but the masses will also not be rising up against the data barons anytime soon.”
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Microsoft Discloses Requests for Data (March 22, 2013)
Microsoft joined the likes of Google and Twitter yesterday in releasing a report on its response to—along with the number and type of—requests for information it has received from law enforcement bodies around the globe. The UK, France, Germany, Turkey and the U.S. accounted for 69 percent of the 70,665 requests received last year, noted a summary of the report in The New York Times, and anyone is free to peruse the data in either pdf or Excel format. Eighty percent of requests resulted in disclosure of “non-content” information, such as name and e-mail address, while 2.2 percent resulted in the handover of customer content as well. Requests affected customers using such services as Hotmail/Outlook.com, Xbox Live and Office 365.

DATA PROTECTION—AUSTRALIA

Breaches Lead to Calls for Notification Law (March 21, 2013)

With cyber-attacks becoming a daily occurrence, security experts and academics are calling for data breach notification laws, The Australian Financial Review reports. While organisations like the Australian Bankers Association have defended IT security already in place, others say breaches are happening that many consumers never hear of and that a “code of silence” about data loss exists. Those consumer advocates are making headway: Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus “is considering proposals that would require companies to report to consumers and the commonwealth privacy commissioner when a data breach occurs, to improve privacy…and bring Australia into line with international jurisdictions,” said a spokesperson. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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PRIVACY LAW—NEW ZEALAND

Code Amended To Protect Newborns’ Blood Samples (March 21, 2013)

Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff has strengthened the Health Information Privacy Code 1994 to improve legal protections for newborns’ bloodspot samples collected as part of a national newborn metabolic screening programme. The amendment will restrict how information derived from the samples may be used and disclosed, Shroff’s office has announced. “DNA testing is getting cheaper and faster all the time and that makes national bloodspot collections more valuable,” Schroff said, noting, “To protect this important programme, which saves dozens of lives each year, we want to give parents confidence their babies’ blood samples aren’t going to be misused.”
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BIG DATA—AUSTRALIA

ATO Chosen To Lead Data Analytics Centre (March 21, 2013)

The Australian Government Information Management Office has announced the creation of the Data Analytics Centre of Excellence, charging the Australian Tax Office with leading the new initiative, which “aims to encourage agencies to share information, skills and to help identify trends useful for shaping governmental policy,” reports The Sydney Morning Herald. The move is seen as a “sea change” in the way the government deals with Big Data statistics and “a good practical approach that lines up all of the key players,” says Ovum analyst Kevin Noonan.
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ONLINE PRIVACY—NEW ZEALAND

Half of New Zealanders Unaware of Data Grab (March 21, 2013)

Roughly half of New Zealanders don’t know that their personal information is being collected by websites and apps, and another one-third are unconcerned about the practice. Such are the findings of research conducted by ConsumerLab, on behalf of telecom firm Ericsson, which surveyed 500 New Zealanders, reports The New Zealand Herald. "When it comes to New Zealand versus other countries, I would say there's relatively low awareness of how and whether information is used," Ericsson's Australasian strategy and marketing general manager, Kursten Leins, told the paper.
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SURVEILLANCE—QUEENSLAND

Concerns Aired Over Drones Ahead of G20 2014 (March 21, 2013)

Announcements that Queensland police plan to use drones for surveillance ahead of the G20 conference in Brisbane next year are sparking privacy concerns, The Australian reports. The Australian Council for Civil Liberties President Terry O'Gorman is calling the planned drone use "Big Brother in the sky,” and has suggested police access to drones is “a ‘huge boost’ to their powers and shouldn't be done without legislation and parliamentary debate,” the report states. To date, 34 Australian organisations are certified to use drones. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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DATA RETENTION—AUSTRALIA

Opinion: Government Policy Raises Concerns (March 21, 2013)

Questions remain about the federal government’s proposed policy requiring the retention of all Internet user activity for a specified time, primarily for use by law enforcement. Discussing the privacy and security of this kind of potentially massive database, Matt Tett opines in CSO, “The higher the value of the target information, the more chance of a breach there will be.” While arguments can be made on either side of the policy, Tett cites a point attributed to Sir Tim Berners-Lee that “it would be a pure goldmine of sensitive, private information over an extended period of time--on every Internet user in Australia.”
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PERSONAL PRIVACY—CHINA

Residents Angry Over Published PI (March 21, 2013)

The Sydney Morning Herald reports on the fury expressed by villagers in southern China after learning their personal information--including contraception methods, ID numbers and home addresses--had been shared on a bulletin board. “The villagers' right to privacy was violated," said Peking University Law Prof. Zhan Zhongle, adding, "It was illegal for the local government to disclose the private information for the good of family planning work." A village official has said the list was published due to “incompetent computer technicians,” the report states.
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DATA RETENTION—AUSTRALIA

AFP Commissioner: Police Need Access to Data (March 14, 2013)

Australian Federal Police Deputy Commissioner Michael Phelan says the police use of cell-site data to track down an Australian woman’s murderer serves as an example of why telecommunications companies should be required to retain data. Phelan says the Telecommunications Interception Act does not reflect current technologies, iTnews reports. “Across Australia last year, law enforcement made half a million requests to telecommunication providers for information, and they had to pass thresholds to get to that.”
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PRIVACY LAW—AUSTRALIA

Commish Releases Guidelines Ahead of Law (March 14, 2013)

In 12 months' time, Australia’s Privacy Amendment (Enhancing Privacy Protection) Act 2012 will become law. Ahead of the law’s implementation, the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner has released draft guidelines to help government agencies and private-sector organisations understand the changes that will occur. Comments are welcomed until 12 April.
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BIG DATA—AUSTRALIA

Gov’t To Issue Big Data Strategy (March 14, 2013)

The federal government plans to issue a Big Data strategy later this year, and, CIO reports, the Australian Government Information Management Office will release an issues paper seeking feedback from industry and the public. After the three-week consultation period ends, a draft is expected in May, and a final report is expected in June or July, the report states. According to one expert, the strategy “will be designed to assist policy agencies as they consider Big Data…while importantly maintaining public trust in the management and security of its data holdings.” He added, “The Australian government is committed to protecting the privacy rights of the public” and said an informed consent mechanism must be in place for citizens.
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CONSUMER PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Google Maps To Go Indoors (March 14, 2013)

Australian Financial Review reports on a new project being unveiled by Google to map indoor floor plans of participating shopping centres, sports venues and museums. The company reportedly has approximately 10,000 floor plans that are available to users in 12 countries. The technology would provide shopping centres with a means by which to advertise to users based on their location. A University of New South Wales professor noted that although potential consumer privacy concerns exist, they were not much different from those associated with Google’s existing outdoor mapping feature.
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GENETIC PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Opinion: New Gene Testing Ignores Privacy (March 14, 2013)

The Department of Health and Ageing will soon release a framework for genetic testing, which may be used to screen newborns, for example. Wendy Bonython and Bruce Baer Arnold of the University of Canberra report for The Conversation on the risk such testing imposes, including the misuse of genetic data. The proposal would attach the data to e-health records amidst lingering concerns on the privacy and security framework surrounding the e-health initiative.
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PRIVACY LAW—CHINA

Social Credit Code Proposal Receives Mixed Reaction (March 14, 2013)

The South China Morning Post reports on the Chinese government’s proposal of a new “social credit code” using national ID card numbers to prevent against registering multiple ID numbers and real estate fraud. Some worry the information compiled on such a registry would allow the government to collect and monitor large amounts of personal data, while others emphasize the need to fight corruption and usher in new transparency in government.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

Study Indicates “Likes” Reveal Personal Data (March 13, 2013)

Research from England’s University of Cambridge indicates a person’s political leanings, age, gender and sexual orientation can be deciphered by studying their Facebook “Likes,” Forbes reports. The study is based on data from 58,000 Facebook users who volunteered. “The model correctly discriminates between homosexual and heterosexual men in 88 percent of cases, African Americans and Caucasian Americans in 95 percent of cases and between Democrat and Republic in 85 percent of cases,” the authors say, adding, the ability to predict individuals’ attributes based on behavior may have negative implications “because it can be easily applied to large numbers of people without obtaining their individual consent and without them noticing.”
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BIG DATA

Authors: The Risks and Benefits of Big Data (March 13, 2013)

Forbes chats with Viktor Mayer-Schönberger and Kenneth Cukier on the future of Big Data. The two are the authors of a new book, Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work and Think, which addresses both the risks and benefits of Big Data. Regarding privacy concerns, the authors say anonymization is not possible when it comes to Big Data. The two are more concerned with “predictive policing,” which may see the use of Big Data analysis to determine which geographic areas and groups to surveil based on the data-based likelihood a crime may be committed. The authors suggest frameworks, including data “expiration dates,” to protect against Big Data’s misuse.
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GENETIC PRIVACY

Report: DNA Samples Could ID Donors (March 12, 2013)

CSO reports on research indicating it could “be possible for anyone, even if they follow rigorous privacy and anonymity practices, to be identified by DNA data from people they do not even know.” Referencing a paper published in Science, the report discusses a process where DNA donors and their relatives could be identified “even without any demographic or personal information.” While laws barring “research institutes from releasing any demographic information about donors would protect patient privacy,” the report notes they would “eliminate the ability of researchers who have identified markers for a particular disease to also identify the ethnic or cultural background of those who might have it.”
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BEHAVIORAL TARGETING

Company Bringing Online Tracking Outside (March 11, 2013)

The New York Times reports on a three-year-old company using the same technology that has made “following people online” big business in order to track consumers “into the physical world.” Euclid Analytics uses businesses’ wireless antennas “to see how many people are coming into a store, how long they stay and even which aisles they walk,” the report states, noting the company “does this by noting each smartphone that comes near the store, feeding on every signal ping the phone sends.” In its three years, Euclid has tracked approximately “50 million devices in 4,000 locations.” (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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PERSONAL PRIVACY

Google Funds “Fashion Recognition” Research (March 11, 2013)

In late February, Google announced the funding of some 102 research projects focused on a variety of fields, from economics to policy standards and privacy. One such project, reports InformationWeek, is InSight, which could work with Google Glass and other mobile platforms to identify individuals “by their visual fingerprint, calculated through assessments of clothing colors, body structure and motion patterns.” The technology could offer an alternative to facial recognition and could be a temporary way, researchers say, to make oneself identifiable in a crowd.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

IAB “Strongly Opposes” Mozilla Move on Cookies (March 11, 2013)

Advertising Age reports on Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) Vice President and General Counsel Mike Zaneis’ message to IAB members on Mozilla’s plans to block third-party cookies by default. Zaneis said the IAB “strongly opposes this move,” calling it harmful to big companies, mom-and-pop small businesses dependent on digital advertising and users themselves. “Ultimately, it is bad for consumer privacy,” he wrote. “This action would break existing consumer choice mechanisms such as the Digital Advertising Alliance opt-out tool.” The message follows Zaneis’ comment last month calling the move a “nuclear first strike” against the ad industry.
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PRIVACY

IAPP Unveils Westin Fellowship, Welcomes Tene To New Role (March 8, 2013)

The International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) has unveiled the Westin Fellowship, named for privacy pioneer Alan Westin and intended to “encourage and enable research and scholarship in the field of privacy.” Recent graduates of undergraduate and graduate programs with high academic standing and a demonstrated interest in privacy may apply for and be awarded 12-month paid residencies at the IAPP and work on privacy research projects under the IAPP’s newly named VP of Research and Education Omer Tene.
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DATA PROTECTION

IAPP Launches Privacy Manager Certification (March 8, 2013)

Yesterday at the IAPP's Global Privacy Summit, the organization launched a companion certification to its long-standing CIPP: the Certified Information Privacy Manager (CIPM).
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SURVEILLANCE—NEW ZEALAND

Drones Used In Police Investigations (March 7, 2013)

The New Zealand Herald reports that police have employed the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) in at least two criminal investigations last year. In one case, law enforcement has not disclosed any details on what the alleged offense was or how the UAVs were used, the report states. Former press secretary David Beatson discovered the authorities’ interest through an Official Information Act request. Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff said UAVs have potentially beneficial uses, “But drones do have the potential to be seriously intrusive for people.”
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DATA LOSS—NEW ZEALAND

Census Collector Apologises for Breach (March 7, 2013)

A census collector who inadvertently disclosed data about one household to another household has apologised for the breach, The New Zealand Herald reports. General Manager Carol Slappendel said the incident was “a case of human error, and the collector’s very, very sorry,” adding breach guidelines issued by New Zealand’s privacy commissioner are being followed.
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SURVEILLANCE

Politician: Glasses Will Be the End of Privacy (March 7, 2013)

An Australian politician has expressed concerns about the surveillance capabilities of a new technology product. South Australian Sen. Cory Bernadi says Google’s new smartphone-like glasses will “lead to the end of privacy,” ZDNet reports. Bernadi says Google Glasses (GG), capable of recording video and audio, has ramifications for the unknowing subject of such recordings. “A single GG wearer in your favourite restaurant could capture your image and your conversation without you ever knowing…You might even find it on a social media site somewhere for millions of others to see,” he said.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

Carnegie Mellon Study: Facebook Users Shared More Over Time (March 7, 2013)

The Huffington Post reports on a Carnegie Mellon University study that followed the privacy practices of 5,076 Facebook users for six years. Researchers found that “during the first four years, users steadily limited what personal data was visible to strangers...” But after Facebook's changes to its platform in 2009 and 2010, users began to share more data with the public. Additionally, “even as people sought to limit what strangers could learn about them from their Facebook profiles, they actually increased what information they shared with their friends.” The researchers said the study’s results highlight “the power of the environment in affecting individual choices.”
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INFORMATION ACCESS—NEW ZEALAND

Commissioner Issues Emergency Response Code (March 5, 2013)

According to a media release, Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff has issued a code of practice that allows for information-sharing between response agencies in times of emergency. "Once a national emergency is declared, it will allow personal information to be collected, used and disclosed as part of managing the response and recovery process,” Shroff said. After a 2011 earthquake, Shroff issued a temporary code that proved useful and was the impetus for creating “a code that would be triggered without delay” in future emergency situations.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

The Shift from Regulatory Requirement to Selling Point (March 4, 2013)
The New York Times reports on privacy’s shift from a regulatory focus to a competitive differentiator for companies. Noting Microsoft’s recent efforts at protecting consumer privacy via its anti-tracking signal in its latest Internet Explorer browser, Prof. Joel Reidenberg of Fordham Law School said, “You’re seeing more companies trying to do that—develop privacy-protecting services.” Additionally, companies are applying standards to the entities they do business with; for example, Apple now requires applications to acquire user permission before tracking locations. Meanwhile, CNN reports federal Do-Not-Track efforts face “an uphill road.” (Registration may be required to access this story.)

DATA LOSS

50 Million Passwords Reset After Breach (March 4, 2013)

Online personal organizer Evernote has reset the passwords for all its nearly 50 million users after “suspicious activity” was discovered on its network, PC Magazine reports. The incident “appears to have been a coordinated attempt to access secure areas,” according to a company blog post. Though the investigation is ongoing, hackers did access a database containing users’ names, e-mail addresses and passwords. Evernote says it used one-way encryption to protect the data. Meanwhile, a new study has revealed that 41 percent of more than 12,000 respondents said it can take up to a week to respond to a breach, and 28 percent said they could respond in a day.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Web Anonymity Tensions Persist (March 1, 2013)

The Hill reports on discussions at this week’s RSA conference in support of reviving “a heated cybersecurity debate over whether to preserve anonymity and the use of pseudonyms in online chat forums and social networks” amidst ongoing tension “between free speech advocates and those who say tougher steps are needed to boost cybersecurity on the Internet.” Meanwhile a CNN report focuses on a panel discussion by industry leaders at the event, asking the question, “Will people share their personal data freely in exchange for more customized service? Or will they become fiercely protective of private information, using tools and browsers that protect their identity from advertisers and other third parties?”
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Opinion: The Cost of Blocking Cookies (March 1, 2013)

Joshua Koran of the cloud marketing platform Turn writes for Advertising Age about the impact that blocking cookies would have not only on digital advertising but also on small publishers and consumer choice. “Nearly everyone agrees that we each have a right to privacy embedded in our own identity. But each of us is also a consumer of advertising-subsidized content, and that advertising relies on the use of anonymous data. Transparency and choice are two fundamental principles that underlie digital privacy guidelines. But how can users make informed choices if they don't understand the implications of their decisions?” Koran writes.
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