ANZ Dashboard Digest

“All human beings have three lives: public, private and secret.” Gabriel Garcia Márquez: A Life

The Easter week witnessed the death of one of our greatest authors, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and tomorrow we commemorate the ANZACs throughout Australia and New Zealand. This is also the second long weekend in a row meaning that, as most people have had 10 days holiday, some are likening us to the land of the Lotus eaters. And if you have been trying to work—it’s a bit like one hand clapping. I have found almost everyone I want to talk to is away. I think that includes a fair bit of media, as there is not much on our favourite topic this week. Just plenty of time for the Royals, which in itself has raised the question of private boundaries, as the Australian press took personal photos of the Royals with long-distance photo lenses. I really do have to wonder about the public interest versus privacy in this instance.

The Marquez quote is to me the essence of why privacy fascinates. The layers, the nuances and the importance for humanity to be able to live without detection is perfectly encapsulated by Marquez.

One of the articles below examines the blurry edges between the public and private lives. Omer Tene and Jules Polonetsky, CIPP/US, discuss the concept of what constitutes “creepy” behavior. The interesting aspect of this is that it changes with circumstance. Whilst it may annoy you when your airline e-mails you about hotel deals at your next destination if you are staying with your family, your reaction could be different if you were in need of accommodation. Reminds me of the story of a woman who was propositioned by a millionaire at a dinner party. Outraged, she asked, “What do you think I am?” To which he replied, “I will give you a million dollars if you spend the night with me.” She acquiesced. The millionaire replied, “Now that we have established what you are, let’s negotiate.”

Perhaps just one of the reasons we have privacy principles rather than laws is to countenance the fluidity of what privacy means to us all. Whatever that baseline is, protections and custodianship of our public, private and secret lives make being a privacy professional a joy.

Enjoy your Dawn Service, your Two Up and your ANZAC Day.

Emma Hossack
President
IAPP ANZ

Top Australia and New Zealand Privacy News

PRIVACY LAW—AUSTRALIA

Regulators: Company Breach Violates Multiple Laws (June 29, 2012)

The Australian Privacy Commissioner and the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) have both announced that telecommunications company Telstra violated the Privacy Act and the Telecommunications Consumer Protections Code when more than 700,000 customer records were made publically accessible, The Sydney Morning Herald reports. ACMA Chairman Richard Bean said, "We are most concerned about the length of time--more than eight months--during which a significant number of Telstra customers' personal information was publically available and accessible." It is believed the ACMA will send a "direction to comply" to the company, the report states.
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ONLINE PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Telstra To Brief Commissioner Pilgrim on Data Practices (June 28, 2012)

Telecommunications company Telstra was scheduled to brief Australian Privacy Commissioner Timothy Pilgrim on Wednesday about its data outsourcing practices, The Australian reports. Red flags were raised by civil libertarian Mark Newton when it was discovered that the company was sending information about its Next G customers’ web browsing habits to a U.S.-based security firm. Telstra said it has cancelled the program. A representative for Pilgrim said the privacy commissioner “will seek further information from Telstra about this matter before deciding whether it will open an investigation.” (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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HEALTHCARE PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Survey: Privacy Concerns Drive Medical Treatment (June 28, 2012)

A survey conducted for healthcare security firm FairWarning has revealed that privacy concerns influence Australian citizens’ healthcare decisions, COMPUTERWORLD reports. Nearly half of the 1,015 respondents said they have withheld or will withhold personal information from providers that have a poor data protection reputation. FairWarning CEO Kurt Long said, “Trust is the bedrock upon which the patient-care provider relationship is founded and when privacy considerations influence that relationship, patient care and treatment outcomes are impacted.”
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GEO PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

New App Helps Employers, Raises Privacy Concerns (June 28, 2012)

Google Maps Coordinate is a new app designed for employers to better track and coordinate employees in the field, but there is a concern the new software could inadvertently track employees during their non-working hours, The Australian reports. Electronics Frontiers Australia said it has no concerns with the technology’s use during work hours but does during out-of-work hours. Google Maps Product Manager Daniel Chu said the app has a privacy button that lets staff turn off the tracking, the report states. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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DATA LOSS—NEW ZEALAND

ACC To Improve Security, Breach Payout Raises Red Flags (June 28, 2012)

ACC has pledged to make “improved trust and confidence” its top priority, and its second priority is “improved management and security of private information,” The New Zealand Herald reports. Meanwhile, the Labour Party is urging ACC claimants affected by a recent breach to not accept the organisation’s compensatory offer of $250. An ACC representative said the compensation is based on a perceived level of harm sustained by claimants. According to the report, claimants who do receive compensation agree to “maintain the strictest confidentiality about the terms of the agreement and settlement of all aspects of it.”
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INFORMATION ACCESS—AUSTRALIA

Opinion: Australian Law Stymies Investigative Journalism (June 28, 2012)

In a column for The Sydney Morning Herald, Markus Mannheim observes “a sad truth: most of the U.S. news investigations I examined could never take place here, because Australian laws and attitudes would stymie them.” Mannheim opines that government has a comparatively secretive system, “one that discloses far less information about its activities than do other Western nations,” adding, “This is usually explained away as respect for privacy.” Yet, Mannheim notes, it’s generally “OK to allow privacy to be breached in person, but not online…”
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FINANCIAL PRIVACY

Authorities Arrest Two Dozen for Computer Crimes (June 27, 2012)

The New York Times reports that authorities in 13 countries have arrested two dozen people accused of committing fraud involving computer crime. "Operation Card Shop" was a two-year effort, authorities said, and prevented potential losses of more than $200 million by notifying credit card providers of more than 400,000 compromised credit and debit cards. Janice Fedarcyk, assistant director of the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, said the arrests would cause "significant disruption to the underground economy." Arrests took place in countries such as the U.S., UK, Bosnia, Bulgaria, Norway and Germany. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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PRIVACY

Hong Kong DPA Releases APPA Forum Highlights (June 27, 2012)

Hong Kong Office of the Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data has released a communiqué featuring highlights from the 37th Asia Pacific Privacy Authorities (APPA) forum. Participants, including government representatives from Australia, Canada, Korea, New Zealand and the U.S., discussed topics such as global privacy enforcement, Google's new privacy policy, information on public registers, smartphone apps, legal assistance to aggrieved data subjects and direct marketing regulation. Government representatives from Japan, Macao and Portugal joined the meeting as observers. Editor's note: The Privacy Advisor recently caught up with Hong Kong Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data Allan Chiang for a Q&A.
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PRIVACY LAW—PHILIPPINES

BPAP Expects Data Privacy Act Finalization Soon (June 25, 2012)

Business Processing Association of the Philippines (BPAP) President and CEO Benedict Hernandez expects President Benigno S. Aquino to sign the Data Privacy Act into law soon, the Manila Bulletin reports. Based on European and Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation standards, the proposed legislation will protect the integrity and confidentiality of personal data, the report states, and will mandate the creation of a National Privacy Commission. Hernandez said, “It brings the Philippines to international standards of privacy protection, so it will increase international investors’ confidence when they outsource their business processes here.”
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FINANCIAL PRIVACY

Nations Working Toward FATCA Implementation (June 22, 2012)

The U.S. has offered up a new model to Switzerland and Japan for implementing the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA)--a law that requires foreign financial institutions to disclose accounts to the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) or face fines, reports Bloomberg. In a joint statement, Switzerland and the U.S. have said they will work "to ensure the effective, efficient and proper implementation" of FATCA, reports The New York Times. The new model is in response to complaints from both the financial industry and privacy regulators who have said privacy laws may make implementing FATCA illegal. In February, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK signed similar agreements.
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PRIVACY LAW—NEW SOUTH WALES

Commissioner: Rail Service Violated Privacy Law (June 21, 2012)

An Office of the New South Wales (NSW) Privacy Commissioner investigation has found passenger rail service RailCorp did not comply with privacy law when it wiped clean unclaimed USB keys it sold at auction, Infosecurity reports. The cleansing process was inadequate because it “did not prevent the recovery of cleansed data using off-the-shelf, inexpensive software,” the report states. NSW Privacy Commissioner Elizabeth Coombs found the company “did not utilise specialised data deletion software” so the information was not protected against loss, unauthorised access, modification, disclosure and misuse. The company has since said it will no longer auction unclaimed USBs and will find a safe way to dispose of them.
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DATA LOSS—NEW ZEALAND

Breach Fallout Continues (June 21, 2012)

APNZ reports on the resignation of ACC Board Member Murray Hilder, noting “just four of the ACC's board remain…in the wake of the Bronwyn Pullar privacy breach scandal.” Recent breaches have involved details on thousands of ACC clients. Hilder’s resignation comes on the heels of the departures of ACC Chief Executive Ralph Stewart and ACC Board Chairman John Judge and members Rob Campbell and John McCliskie, the report states, and amidst allegations Pullar implied “that it was ACC managers who first suggested a deal with her for the return of leaked data about thousands of clients,” the report states. Meanwhile, The New Zealand Herald reports ACC will offer compensation in the wake of the privacy breach.
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DATA LOSS—QUEENSLAND

Records Recovered From Gutter (June 21, 2012)

The CEO of Queensland Health Central Queensland is quiet on the discovery earlier this month of medical documents in a gutter, The Morning Bulletin reports. The Rockhampton Hospital records, which may have contained the names and contacts of at-risk children, lay in a public street for 90 minutes before a journalist collected them and brought them to hospital staff.
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PRIVACY LAW—AUSTRALIA & EU

Cookie Regs, Anyone? (June 21, 2012)

The Register asked three Australian government entities whether they plan to adopt a European Union-like approach to regulating websites’ use of cookies. In a statement, the Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) said, “The OAIC has examined the EU Directive and is considering whether to issue specific advice to Australian businesses using cookies on websites.” The OAIC added, “We are not aware of any plans to issue an EU-style directive on cookies in Australia,” but the office is considering “whether additional advice is needed as a supplement to the ongoing privacy law reform process that is currently underway.”
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PRIVACY LAW—AUSTRALIA

Greens Warn of Surveillance, Data Retention (June 21, 2012)

Delimiter reports on a statement released by the Australian Greens warning that certain legal codes are leading to a “one-way militarisation of the Internet,” leaving expectations of privacy and freedom from state coercion in their wake. Greens Sen. Scott Ludlam pointed to the Cybercrime Bill (2011) and the recent data retention proposal as examples of state intrusion into private lives. “In Australia, increasingly expansive and poorly defined surveillance powers are regularly passed through the Parliament with minimal debate,” said Ludlam, adding that Australians “have a strong tradition of standing up for free speech and freedom of association--we need to safeguard these traditions in the online environment.”
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SOCIAL NETWORKING—AUSTRALIA & U.S.

Experts: Privacy Is the Hitch with Age Verification (June 21, 2012)

The Australian Financial Review reports on one advocate’s concerns that “Australia should consider making data collection from under-13s illegal as it is in the U.S.” That call echoes concerns raised in a report from The New York Times outlining the difficulties of identifying the ages of Internet users. Recent cases of adults masquerading as children on a social network aimed at 13- to 17-year-olds has the site looking for a better way to vet users, but those who've studied age verification technologies are not optimistic, the report states.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Advice on Leaving Behind Your Digital Legacy (June 21, 2012)

The Sydney Morning Herald explores the topic of “e-life after death,” where “you pass on, but your digital self remains on.” A Curtin University researcher, Tama Leaver, says, “It’s important for people to consider their online material as an asset and to think about how that’s managed. If you have a partner or person you trust deeply, or whoever would be the executor of your will, you should make somewhere available so they can find your most important passwords.”
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Report: In the End, Users Have the Power (June 21, 2012)

The Australian explores privacy issues in a feature about certain tech giants, suggesting, “The shine is coming off Silicon Valley’s finest,” as “Hardly a day passes without some new revelation of one of them taking a byte too far.” Regulators open, close and reopen investigations, and legislative proposals are introduced, “Yet there is little evidence that such moves are working,” and in the end it is “the users who have the real power...The choice is ours--at the click of a mouse," the report states. (Registration may be required to access this article.)
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RFID—KOREA

RFID-Enabled Cards Cause Privacy Debate (June 21, 2012)

Korea’s National Emergency Management Agency has partnered with Korea Exchange Bank’s credit card unit to issue RFID-enabled cards designed to assist emergency services personnel in obtaining information about patients they treat, The Korea Times reports. The move has generated a heated debate about privacy, according to the report. The cards will contain biological information such as blood type, health conditions and other identity data, and emergency workers will use RFID devices to read the cards’ chips. “All information contained in the chip will be encoded, so only emergency service workers who have the RFID devices will be able to check the data,” an official said.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Apple Obtains Online “Cloning” Patent (June 21, 2012)

Apple has been awarded a patent for a method of generating fake online identities, or "clone" identities, to thwart the online profiling of Internet users, reports InformationWeek. Apple received U.S. Department of Justice approval for the patent on Tuesday. Known as "Techniques to pollute electronic profiling," the patent describes how the clone identity "appears to be the principal to others that interact (with) or monitor the clone over the network," performing activities that would not reflect the interests of the real user. The patent calls automated online monitoring programs "little brothers" and says, "Even the most cautious Internet users are still being profiled over the Internet via dataveillance techniques from automated (little) brothers." Apple has not confirmed the acquisition.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

Facial Recognition Acquisition Spurs Privacy Concerns (June 19, 2012)

Facebook has announced the acquisition of its long-time vendor Face.com, the company that provides the technology for its photo tagging suggestion feature, reports Daily Mail. A Facebook spokesman said, "Face.com's technology has helped to provide the best photo experience. This transaction simply brings a world-class team and a long-time technology vendor in house." But the company's use of facial-recognition technology "has spurred concerns about user privacy," the report states. The deal means Facebook will acquire the technology and the 11 employees of the Israeli company.
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PRIVACY LAW—KOREA

KCC To Begin Cracking Down on Data Collection (June 15, 2012)

Beginning next month, Korean website operators will be prohibited from requiring that consumers divulge their resident identification numbers in order to use their sites, The Korea Herald reports. "We will strictly restrict this practice of gathering and using personal identification numbers online as a means to protect individual information," said an official from the Korea Communications Commission. The aim is to reduce instances of identity theft and boost data protection. In addition, sites will be required to delete existing ID numbers within two years.
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DATA LOSS—NEW ZEALAND

Another Breach Reported at ACC, Bosses Step Down (June 14, 2012)

3 News reports that the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) has sent details on “a significant amount” of its customers to one customer when he requested his own file. This follows two similar breaches at the company--one exposing more than 100 records and another involving 9,000. Radio New Zealand reports both the chairman of the ACC’s board, John Judge, and its chief executive, Ralph Stewart, have resigned this week, as well as two other executives. Political groups are taking sides over whether the company’s minister Judith Collins should be removed from her post as well. The Labour Party says ACC needs a change at the ministerial level, but Collins says she’s working to change the culture.
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PERSONAL PRIVACY—NEW ZEALAND

Mapping Initiatives Get Commissioner’s Attention (June 14, 2012)

Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff is paying attention to new mapping technologies being developed by Google and Apple, reports NewstalkZB. According to the report, Apple has aeroplanes creating a detailed three-dimensional mapping feature for its devices, and Shroff plans to call for a briefing prior to the New Zealand launch of the feature. Assistant Privacy Commissioner Katrine Evans says Google plans to consult the commission through its data collection process.
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TRAVELLERS’ PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Scanners Will Show Prosthetics, Not Stick Figures (June 14, 2012)

Internal documents released under the Freedom of Information Act show that plans to program airport full-body scanners to show stick figures have been scrapped, reports The Sydney Morning Herald. The scanners will instead show a full-body image that identifies prosthetics, prompting a breast cancer survivor group to alert members to carry a doctor’s note. The documents also showed an agreement between Office of Transport Security (OTS) Executive Director Paul Retter and Australian Information Commissioner John McMillan to remove a privacy quality assurance program. According to an OTS spokesman, it was deemed that because “no personal information would be collected, stored or disclosed during the body-scanning process, the National Privacy Principles did not apply,” the report states.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

Posting Holiday Photos May Invite Burglary (June 14, 2012)

A report in The Age details ways in which posting information about your upcoming trip or photos while on holiday to social networking sites could lead criminals to target you. ''Not only are you telling me where you are, you're telling me where you're not,'' said one cyber-safety consultant, adding, “police don't ask about social media when they attend burglaries, we have no idea of the extent of the problem.” Geo-tags, which are automatically included on photos taken with most smartphones, identify photo locations and can be extracted on many photo-sharing applications, so even if you don’t post your location, others can decipher it.
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PRIVACY LAW—UK

ICO Reopens Street View Investigation (June 13, 2012)

Steve Eckersley, enforcement chief of the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO), sent a letter to Google executive Alan Eustace saying the ICO is reopening its investigation into the collection of personal data by Google's Street View service, reports The Washington Post. An April U.S. Federal Communications Commission report found that Google deliberately collected the data. According to Eckersley's letter, the ICO was told the collection was a "simple mistake," adding, "If the data was collected deliberately, then it is clear that this is a different situation than was reported to us in April 2010." Google responded in a statement saying, "We're happy to answer the ICO's questions." On Tuesday, Google released documents relating to the U.S. federal investigation into its activities, including affidavits from nine people denying any knowledge of the data collection. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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BEHAVIORAL TARGETING

Online Ads To Match Your Emotions (June 13, 2012)

Microsoft has filed patents for tracking systems "to match online advertisements to moods," the Toronto Star reports. The systems would track emotions "including facial expressions captured in video conversations and Facebook status updates," the report states, and could result in, for example, "weight-loss ads matched with unhappy people--who are more likely to want to change their lifestyle--and electronic ads with happy people--who are more likely to spend." Privacy advocates are questioning such mood-tracking technology. "Definitely when you're talking about people's emotional states, you're getting closer to sensitive data that relates to their identity," said Tamir Israel of the Canadian Internet Policy & Public Interest Clinic.
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HEALTHCARE PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Questions Remain About EHR Plan (June 12, 2012)

Doctors and consumers still have questions about how the soon-to-be implemented e-health system will work, reports ABC. Heather Ewart talks to representatives from the Australian Medical Association (AMA) and National E-Health Transition Authority who voice concerns about the management and security of the information in the system as well as doctors’ liability in terms of reading all the information in a patient’s file. The system is expected to go into effect in two weeks, but many healthcare providers are not “rushing to the fountain,” the article states. And Steve Hambleton, federal president of the AMA, says one reason may be there’s “no business case” for medical professionals or organisations to sign up.
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MOBILE PRIVACY

Report: Apple To Release New Tracking Tool (June 11, 2012)
In what The Wall Street Journal reports is "the company's latest attempt to balance developers' appetite for targeting data with consumers' unease over how it is used," Apple will reportedly release a new tracking tool for mobile app developers. While Apple declined to comment, individuals briefed about the plan have indicated the tool aims to better protect user privacy. "How Apple's new technology works and what it will allow developers to track remains unclear," the report states. "One of the people briefed said that the new anonymous identifier is likely to rely on a sequence of numbers that isn't tied to a specific device." (Registration may be required to access this story.)

PRIVACY LAW—PHILIPPINES

Senate Ratifies Data Privacy Act Bicameral Report (June 7, 2012)

The Senate Wednesday ratified a bicameral committee report on the Data Protection Act, according to the Zambo Times. The legislation would mandate that each public- and private-sector entity "protect and preserve the integrity, security and confidentiality of personal data collected in its operations," the report states. Based on the EU Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC, the act would also establish a National Privacy Commission to implement and enforce the bill's provisions. Journalists have criticized portions of the legislation because of strong penalties around "leaked" information.
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PRIVACY LAW—AUSTRALIA

Commissioner Says Superannuation Fund Breached Act (June 7, 2012)

The First State Super Trustee Corporation (FSS) has been found to have breached the Privacy Act, ZDNet reports. The privacy commissioner opened an investigation after an incident in October where a security director discovered that information from FSS systems was vulnerable to snooping by other FSS customers. The investigation found personal information, including member names and addresses, details of account transactions, balances and members' ages, could be downloaded from FSS, the report states. The investigation also found FSS had the capacity to remedy the vulnerabilities before the security director's discovery and breached the act because of its inaction.
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EMPLOYEE PRIVACY—NEW ZEALAND

Commissioner: Employer Breached E-Mail Privacy (June 7, 2012)

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner has ruled that an employer breached the Privacy Act by using keystroke information to find out an employee’s personal e-mail password in order to conduct an investigation, Stuff.co.nz reports. The employer’s staff policies were not clear enough, and the commissioner ruled the collection of personal e-mail details was disproportionate to the employer’s needs. Both sides have reached an undisclosed settlement.
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DATA LOSS

LinkedIn Investigates Breach, Defends Calendar Syncing (June 7, 2012)
Business social network LinkedIn has launched an investigation into a breach of as many as six million user passwords that may have been published on a hacker's website. According to an official LinkedIn update, users will "benefit from the enhanced security we just recently put in place..." Ireland's data protection authority said it may investigate the incident, and U.S. lawmakers are calling for data security legislation. The University of Virginia and eHarmony also had systems breached this week. Meanwhile, The New York Times reports on findings by security researchers revealing that LinkedIn's mobile app may transmit iPhone and iPad calendar details back to company servers without user knowledge. The practice, the report states, may violate Apple's privacy guidelines. A LinkedIn spokeswoman said the "calendar sync feature is a clear 'opt-in' experience." (Registration may be required to access this story.)

GEO PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Auto “Black Boxes” Raise Privacy Concerns (June 7, 2012)

The Sydney Morning Herald reports on the growing use of “black boxes” that are placed on windscreens to help lower car insurance rates. The technology can combine video recording and GPS data to help prove traffic accident faults. New South Wales Council for Civil Liberties (NSW CCL) warns the new technology has given rise to privacy risks, the report states. An example would be an employer installing a device without an employee’s consent. A NSW CCL representative said the practice would be “an outrageous invasion of employee’s privacy.”
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PRIVACY LAW—PHILIPPINES

House Panel Drops Media Penalty Provisions (June 6, 2012)

A House panel has taken out provisions that were in a proposed data privacy bill imposing fines and jail sentences on journalists but, Manila Standard Today reports, the Senate has retained other penalty clauses with which various press organisations have disagreed. A representative from the National Union of Journalists of the Philippines said, “Deleting the provision on penalties for media does not negate the fact that such a law will still prevent journalists from performing their duty of providing the public relevant information.”
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DATA RETENTION—AUSTRALIA

Ludlam Raises Concerns About “OzLog” (June 6, 2012)

COMPUTERWORLD AUSTRALIA reports on comments made by Greens Sen. Scott Ludlam regarding government plans to require ISPs to retain user data for intelligence-gathering purposes. OzLog, the term used to describe the data retention proposal, “is flawed,” said Ludlam, because “it makes a number of rather dangerous assumptions” including the consideration “that we’re all dangerous criminals and all our personal information is to be recorded in perpetuity so that we can be prosecuted later on.” Ludlam also questioned whether the proposal is technologically feasible for ISPs. “I think it raises massive privacy implications,” he said, adding, “I don’t think it’s been very well thought through.”
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Concerns About Microsoft’s Do-Not-Track Default (June 4, 2012)
MediaPost News reports on industry reaction to Microsoft's announcement last week that its newest version of Internet Explorer in its Windows 8 operating system will feature do not track as the default setting. The announcement has incited criticism from the Digital Advertising Alliance (DAA). Stu Ingis, DAA counsel, says he doubts ad networks will respect the do-not-track command if it hasn't been activated by users themselves. "It's hard for me to believe that anyone would follow the command when it's not really a consumer choice," he said. The Association of National Advertisers has urged Microsoft to rethink the decision. Microsoft's Chief Privacy Officer, Brendon Lynch, CIPP/US, said in a blog post, the move is "an important step in this process of establishing privacy by default, putting consumers in control and building trust online."

PRIVACY LAW—AUSTRALIA

Government To Consider Data Retention Reforms (June 1, 2012)

COMPUTERWORLD reports on the federal government's push for reforms that could mean Internet service providers would keep consumers' information on file for up to two years. The data may include browsing information potentially accessible by intelligence agencies investigating crimes. Attorney General Nicola Roxon says she has referred the matter, and four other legislative reforms, to the Joint Intelligence Committee. While government is still considering whether to pass the reforms, law enforcement backs them, Roxon said. Electronic Frontiers Australia says the public will be locked out of discussions on the matter and notes the potential for data access abuse.
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PRIVACY LAW—NEW ZEALAND

Gov’t To Review Privacy Provisions in Three Years (June 1, 2012)

The government has agreed to review privacy provisions in its new welfare law, reports The New Zealand Herald . Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff has urged a select committee to delete sections of the draft law that would allow the Education and Social Development Ministries and private agencies to share information about young people, the report states. The government has kept the information-sharing provision in the bill so it can come into force 30 July but will review the provision in three years, it says.
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PRIVACY LAW—NEW SOUTH WALES

Amendment Could Share Blood Tests Without Consent (June 1, 2012)

Proposed changes to New South Wales (NSW) laws could mean that those tested for predispositions to genetic diseases may no longer have a say in whether their results are shared with close relatives, The Sydney Morning Herald reports. NSW Health Minister Jillian Skinner has introduced legislation to allow doctors to alert at-risk family members in cases where blood tests show they may be at risk of cancer or heart disease. The Greens are calling for amendments to the bill to ensure privacy of patients and their relatives, the report states, citing implications for insurance claims, for example.
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