ANZ Dashboard Digest

A new approach to notice and consent has been around for at least a couple of years now. The Microsoft whitepaper was released late 2012, and several subsequent books by privacy thought-leaders have developed this theme, which makes sense. Individuals ought to be given the opportunity to shape their profiles and to have a role in transactions involving their data, and notice and consent will no longer suffice. Equally, entities that stand to benefit from the information should protect their source if they wish to guarantee the future supply of valuable data.

If this approach is accepted, some of the stories this week indicate that there is still a long journey ahead. Whilst many entities still appear to treat privacy as a compliance issue, and one where boundaries should be pressed, others continue to succeed based on adoption of the new approach. It will be interesting to see how this divide plays out in terms of commercial success. That other old chestnut of balancing the right to information against the right to privacy also gets some play this week in the opinion piece titled “Privacy starts to bite.” To hear all about it and ask your own questions of the experts, make sure you book your place at our Privacy Awareness Week breakfast discussion on 6 May as debate on the Australian Law Reform Commission paper on serious invasions to privacy in a digital age continues.

A safe and very Happy Easter to you all,

Emma Hossack
President
IAPP ANZ

Top Australia and New Zealand Privacy News

ONLINE PRIVACY

Expert: The Re-identification Devil Is in the Details (March 30, 2011)

When it comes to protecting privacy online, the biggest threat lies in the everyday details Internet users share without realizing that even anonymous postings can be correlated to expose their identities. That's according to University of Colorado Law School Prof. Paul Ohm, who spoke recently on the process of "re-identification." Deleting information is not enough, Thinq.co.uk reports, as companies can identify users by drawing inferences from the bits of data left behind. "We have to get used to talking about the price of privacy," Ohm notes, adding, "Maybe we should give up some of the efficiency and convenience of the Internet if we can protect privacy."
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DATA PROTECTION—THAILAND

Networked Medical Devices Bring Breach Risks (March 30, 2011)

A recent report by Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) found that the increasing use of networked medical devices puts patient data at greater risk. IHE conducted research into the medical equipment management and cybersecurity, and while they found no attacks on the devices themselves, found instances where the devices "became casualties of a larger malware outbreak or where a device was the entry point for an attack," reports the Bangkok Post. Dr. Sutee Tuvirat of the Thai Medicine Informatics Association says the Public Health Ministry can play an important role in regulating healthcare security.
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PRIVACY LAW—NEW ZEALAND & EU

Companies Awaiting Adequacy Notice (March 29, 2011)

Six months after the New Zealand Parliament passed legislation to comply with European privacy laws, companies are still waiting for the okay to do business in Europe, Computerworld reports. At least one New Zealand business says it has lost clients due to not being branded "adequate" under European privacy law, says Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff. Further meetings and analyses are in process, and a formal recommendation for acceptance may come next month, the report states, noting the approval process has been underway for more than 10 years.
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DATA LOSS

Study: Many Companies Don’t Report, Don’t Fix (March 29, 2011)

The results of a recent study by cybersecurity vendor McAfee indicate that six in 10 companies pick and choose which data breaches to report and half of those that have experienced a breach make changes to fix and protect their systems from future breaches, reports The Huffington Post. The study surveyed over 1,000 senior IT professionals from Brazil, China, India, Japan, the Middle East, the UK and the U.S. about the challenges of protecting corporate data. According to the report, outsourcing and mobile devices are expected to pose even greater challenges to data security as they become more prevalent.
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ONLINE PRIVACY—NEW ZEALAND

Survey: Web Users More Concerned About Privacy (March 28, 2011)

High-profile breaches may be causing a shift in attitudes about the value of privacy online, Computerworld reports. That's according to a recent survey launched by the Office of the Privacy Commissioner on public- and private-sector organizations' experiences with cloud computing and overseas data transfers. Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff said people with more sensitivity to their privacy "may well be in the majority," in contrast with those willing to sacrifice privacy for online services. The office has received about 50 responses after extending the deadline to March 21 due to the Christchurch earthquake. The results are planned to be announced during Privacy Week beginning May 1.
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HEALTHCARE PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Merger Raises Data Linkage Worries (March 25, 2011)

Opponents to a merger between Medicare and Centrelink say privacy is at risk, The Australian reports. Australian Privacy Foundation health spokeswoman Juanita Fernando said the merger, part of a bill being considered by the Senate Community Affairs Committee, is "dreadful" and will allow for linkages of data. Further, the Department of Human Services would be empowered to seize computer equipment containing large amounts of patient records. "One's personal information...is available to an additional 27,000 Centrelink employees and agencies and access points employing any number of staff," Fernando said. Privacy Commissioner Timothy Pilgrim said if the bill is passed, Medicare is expected to update protocols with appropriate protections for personal information.
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DATA PROTECTION—AUSTRALIA

Expanse of Database PII Causing Public Concern (March 25, 2011)

The Australian reports that the expanding volume of personal information held in government and business databases is causing the public concern about their privacy, says Information Commissioner John McMillan. Speaking in Canberra, the commissioner said people are worried about data stored about "their financial and taxation affairs, their family and medical history, employment records and transactions with agencies." He added that the privacy commissioner received 60 notices of breaches this year. Noting the government's indication that it will increase the enforcement powers of the privacy commissioner, McMillan said that the "prospect of financial penalties for privacy breaches will provide an added incentive for organizations to take their responsibilities seriously."
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HEALTHCARE PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

APF Wants Consultations on E-Health (March 25, 2011)

As the government works to implement its e-health project, the Australian Privacy Foundation (APF) says the health minister has not kept her promise to consult with key stakeholders in the planning stages. "Unless you take action right now, key decisions will be made in an unsatisfactory manner, without consumer advocacy involvement," said APF Chair Roger Clarke in letters published on the foundation's Web site. Clark said 20 days have passed since the letter was sent and there is still no word from Health Minister Nicola Roxon, who said at an e-health conference in November she would engage stakeholders. Clark said no working group has been established and advocates have become "deeply frustrated," The Australian reports.
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CHILDREN’S PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Social Network Defends Privacy Measures (March 25, 2011)

Via teleconference in front of an Australian Senate committee, Facebook's head of privacy said children under age 13 are not tolerated on the social networking site. Responding to allegations that children under 13 were in fact accessing the site, Chief Privacy Adviser Mozelle Thompson said the company removes nearly 20,000 underage users globally each day. "This is something we work on all the time," Thompson said, adding that the company is recruiting a cybersafety policy expert to be based in Australia, ABC News reports. The company is also collaborating with the Australian Federal Police and is working on an online safety guide, the report states.
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CHILDREN’S PRIVACY—NEW ZEALAND

Product Allows Parents To Monitor Kids’ Phone Use (March 25, 2011)

A product launched this week that lets parents monitor their children's mobile phone use via the Internet is raising concerns, reports The New Zealand Herald. MyFone enables parents to see the phone numbers called and answered as well as the content of all texts on a protected Web site, the report states. The service is aimed at curbing cyberbullying and other offenses, but New Zealand Council of Civil Liberties spokesman Batch Hales said the service is unnecessary and allows parents to listen in to their kids conversations. The developers of the service said, "We know this is going to be controversial because of the whole civil rights issue, but what's more important--our children's civil rights or their safety and protection?"
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PRIVACY LAW—AUSTRALIA

EFA: Privacy Act May Conflict with Convention Adherence (March 25, 2011)

Electronic Frontiers Australia (EFA) has warned that Australia's privacy legislation may be at odds with government plans to adhere to the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime, IT News reports. The concerns come in response to the attorney general's call for submissions on the plan. The EFA is concerned about a convention provision requiring member countries to retain data for up to 90 days. To avoid conflicting regulations, the Australian government considered amending the country's data retention law, but an EFA spokesman said that could put citizens' data at risk for hacking and could have a "corrosive effect on Australians' faith and trust in government." Others say adhering to the convention would help address the public's trust.

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ONLINE PRIVACY—VICTORIA

Survey: Teens Lack Privacy Education on Social Networks (March 25, 2011)

In a recent survey, 72 percent of Victorian teenagers polled said they had received unpleasant or unwanted contact from strangers via online profiles, The Sydney Morning Herald reports. The Teenagers, Legal Risks and Social Networking Sites survey, led by Monash University, polled 1,000 students at 17 Victorian schools. According to the study, a focus recently on cyberbullying resulted in a lack of education for young people against breaking privacy and copyright laws, among others. "Young people failed to understand the 'significant legal implications' of their actions online," the report states, and "less than 14 percent were concerned about security risks such as identity theft."
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ONLINE PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Survey Respondents Want Web Browser Regulation (March 25, 2011)

While the majority of people polled in a recent survey have a positive view of the company, two-thirds of Australian participants said they feel Google should be regulated by the government on issues such as protecting privacy, The Sydney Morning Herald reports. The poll, which surveyed 1,000 participants, found that 45 percent said they thought Google did a good job of protecting privacy, while 63 percent said the company should be regulated. The poll results followed an announcement by the CNIL, France's data privacy regulator, ofa €100,000 fine against the company for the collection of personal information over unencrypted wireless networks by its Street View vehicles.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Do Not Track: A Business Differentiator, for Now (March 25, 2011)

Mozilla's new version of Firefox and Microsoft's updated Internet Explorer both contain do-not-track features allowing users to state their preference about how their online movements are used to serve them ads. The launches represent a critical step forward in the debate about digital privacy, writes James Temple for The San Francisco Chronicle. "Businesses must now choose which of two camps they want to fall into, those that respect consumer wishes and those that don't," he writes.
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PRIVACY

Scientist: “Surveillance Society Inevitable, Irresistible” (March 24, 2011)

There's enough data floating around about any given person to predict where they'll be next Thursday around 5:53 p.m., says Jeff Jonas, chief scientist of IBM's Entity Analytics group. The question is how privacy models will change as a result of the amount of data collected via cell phones, transactions and social media sites, among others, ZDNet reports. "The surveillance society is inevitable and irresistible," Jonas said at a recent conference in New York, adding that he's working on an "analytic sensemaking" machine that will incorporate privacy features into it from its construction that cannot be turned off. The system, called G2, aims to "explore new physics of big data," the report states.
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BEHAVIORAL TARGETING

Social Network Turns User “Likes” Into Ads (March 24, 2011)

PCWorld reports that Facebook's "sponsored stories" ad plan, which has raised concerns among privacy advocates, is now being rolled out across the social network. For those who don't like the plan, Dan Tynan suggests in his report, "don't 'Like' it--or anything else. Because once you do...There is no opting out. Facebook can use your name and profile image alongside any product you endorse, per its privacy policy." A forthcoming plan to allow third-party advertisers to put users' images and names in a similar way will have an opt-out, the report states.
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BEHAVIORAL TARGETING

Advocates: Device Fingerprinting Easier To Track Than Cookies (March 22, 2011)
Device fingerprinting technology now allows advertisers to specifically identify connected devices such as computers and smart phones. When devices send or receive data, they transmit pieces of information about their properties and settings that can be pieced together to form a unique "fingerprint" for that device, ClickZ reports. This concerns privacy advocates, as a device's fingerprint is more persistent than a Web-tracking tool such as a cookie. "You don't have any control over them, or at least not the same kind of control you do over cookies...That makes fingerprinting a serious privacy threat," said Peter Eckersley of the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

ONLINE PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Experts Say New Opt-Out Guidelines Lack Teeth (March 21, 2011)

Starting today, new guidelines allow consumers to opt out of receiving targeted ads based on their online movements. But some experts say the new guidelines don't do enough to protect user privacy and are calling for more robust measures, The Sydney Morning Herald reports. Ten companies have thus far signed on to a code that introduces rules around the tracking of users and will now have six months to enact an opt-out mechanism that users can access at Web site youronlinechoice.com.au. A spokesman from Electronic Frontiers Australia said the new guidelines will actually do little to increase privacy and calls instead for a do-not-track mechanism. A government spokesperson said the new guidelines are the "start of an ongoing process."
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PRIVACY LAW—CHINA

Recent Regulations Aim to Protect Credit Cardholders (March 21, 2011)

The Hunton & Williams Privacy and Information Security Law Blog reports on new measures passed in January by the China Banking Regulatory Commission, the first regulations aimed at protecting credit card business in China and including provisions on personal information. The regulations prevent commercial banks from disclosing or using customer information for purposes other than the credit card transaction; require commercial banks to craft guidelines on marketing efforts, including that credit card application information is kept confidential except with the applicants' consent, and ensure that documents sent as communications to credit cardholders do not contain the full credit card number. Violations of such provisions could include fines or criminal liability.
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PRIVACY LAW—NEW ZEALAND

Earthquake Information Sharing Code Extended (March 18, 2011)

The code of practice Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff issued after the Christchurch earthquake has been extended to 24 May. The commissioner issued the temporary Information Sharing Code on 24 February to assist with response to the disaster. The code allows emergency services to share personal information as necessary to help victims find relatives, get back home or receive medical or financial assistance. "Businesses and others have greater flexibility to share information," Shroff said. "For instance, a business might have records they think might be useful and want to volunteer. Similarly, a business might be asked for confidential information by authorities or family members."
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DATA PROTECTION—NEW SOUTH WALES

Government Destroys Data Ahead of Regime Change (March 18, 2011)

Ahead of the regime change in two weeks, current Labour Government employees are destroying sensitive files. Staffers have been shredding documents, The Daily Telegraph reports, and bins have been wheeled into offices to cart them away. A best-practice document advises employees to use a two-way shredder to destroy documents and a digital sanitisation method such as a magnetic field to destroy electronic data stored on memory sticks, copy machines and printers. One staffer quipped that with all the document destruction, "it's like the museum of lost opportunity in here."
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SOCIAL NETWORKING—SOUTH AUSTRALIA

One in Five Online Teens Willing to Meet A Stranger (March 18, 2011)

The Australian reports that almost one in five South Australian teens has met a stranger they befriended on Facebook in person, according to a recent survey. The Teenspeak survey polled 500 teens ages 13 to 17 and also found that: 23 percent had been "friended" by a stranger; more than 50 percent post their personal details on their profile pages, including phone numbers and e-mail addresses, and 30 percent said their parents never checked their computer screen. A Teenspeak researcher from Flinders University said he considers the Internet as dangerous as drugs or alcohol to teens. "But this one doesn't have a stigma," he said.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

E-Commerce Site Makes Changes After Users Complain (March 16, 2011)

As a result of privacy concerns voiced by a number of users, an e-commerce Web site has decided to stop publishing customers' purchase histories within user feedback posts. Etsy recently activated a "people search" tool allowing users to search for other users' names as a way to view purchases and recommendations. However, some users claimed they were not notified that their information would become public when they initially entered their full names on the Web site. Etsy has now disabled the feature and says it is considering further changes to protect buyer privacy, Ars Technica reports. In the future, the site may allow users to post purchases, but it would be "completely opt-in," executives said.
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PERSONAL PRIVACY

The Changing Meaning of “Personal Data” (March 16, 2011)

William Baker and Anthony Matyjaszewski explore the changing meaning of "personal data" in this preview article for the upcoming April edition of the IAPP member newsletter, the Privacy Advisor. The article includes a compendium of definitions outlining how the term is defined within data protection laws worldwide.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

Study: Attitudes on Privacy Becoming Polarized (March 16, 2011)

According to a Ponemon Institute study, 58 percent of social network users feel their privacy is less important to them than it was five years ago, while 53 percent of non-users said it is more important, msnbc.com reports. Ponemon Institute Founder Larry Ponemon, CIPP, called the findings surprising, adding, "The fact is there's not a lot of complacency about privacy now. People are thinking about this." Privacy expert Alessandro Aquisti says one reason for the polarization may be that the more people use social networks, "the more costly it becomes for others (who aren't members) to be loyal to their views...That means some people's right to privacy is being rendered more difficult to protect precisely by the right of other people not to care about privacy."
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Microsoft Do-Not-Track Tool To Debut Tuesday (March 15, 2011)

Microsoft's newest version of Internet Explorer is set to release on Tuesday with a do-not-track tool to help Internet users "keep their online habits from being monitored." However, concerns persist as to whether self-regulatory approaches will work. The Wall Street Journal reports that Microsoft and Mozilla have adopted do not track in the wake of the Federal Trade Commission's recommendation for such tools, highlighting "the pressure the industry faces to provide people with a way to control how they are tracked and targeted online" with legislation being contemplated at the federal level. However, the report goes on to state, industry-based systems "will only work if tracking companies agree to respect visitors' requests," and to date, none have publicly agreed. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Working On-The-Go Could Pose Privacy Threats (March 15, 2011)

The ability to take work on the road via laptops, tablets and smartphones enabled for WiFi access is convenient, but these mobile offices are vulnerable to data breaches, The New York Times reports. According to a report by Symantec and the Ponemon Institute, such breaches are becoming more expensive. From leaving laptops in hotel rooms to using public WiFi to sharing information on social networks, experts detail the myriad risks to personal and business data. Prof. Betsy Page Sigman of Georgetown's McDonough School of Business suggests, "You want to be overly cautious, especially if you are around a lot of competitors." (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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ONLINE PRIVACY

DPAs, Others Weigh “Right To Be Forgotten” (March 11, 2011)

Across borders, discussions are in full swing over the dichotomy between the Internet's inability to forget and the call for a "right to be forgotten." In a Forbes report, Kashmir Hill notes, for example, that just such a right "has been affirmed by the Spanish DPA," which recently called for Web sites to delete "inaccurate or out-of-date links" from searches. Meanwhile, Google Global Privacy Counsel Peter Fleischer writes, "More and more, privacy is being used to justify censorship. In a sense, privacy depends on keeping some things private, in other words, hidden, restricted or deleted. And in a world where ever more content is coming online, and where ever more content is findable and shareable, it's also natural that the privacy countermovement is gathering strength."
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PERSONAL PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Government Opts for Gambler Smartcards (March 11, 2011)

In the wake of privacy concerns about plans to use biometric cards at casinos, the government has opted to use smartcards instead, The Sydney Morning Herald reports. Though biometric cards would be less expensive than smartcards and would help prevent gamblers from sharing them, concerns surfaced about the need for a central database housing such personal data. "All the information is contained on the card. That's the easy part," the report states. "But how the cards are issued and controlled could produce unpopular recommendations when the committee reports to parliament." A potential solution includes a 100-point verification system and a photo to prevent against fraudulent card use.
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ONLINE PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Advocates: Customer Data Collection is Often Excessive (March 11, 2011)

The Sydney Morning Herald reports on the increasing amounts of personal data businesses are collecting from customers. A spokeswoman with the Consumer Credit Legal Centre NSW says the majority of the data collected is used primarily for marketing databases, which puts customers at risk in the case of a security breach. Australia's privacy principles state that data should only be collected for the purpose of conducting business--a vague parameter, the report states. Christopher Zinn from consumer advocacy group Choice says businesses are collecting unnecessary data. ''We've had stories of people who have bought pillowcases and been asked to give their postcode," he said.
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PERSONAL PRIVACY—NEW ZEALAND

Privacy Provisions Suspended To Assist Quake Response (March 11, 2011)

Privacy protections have been temporarily placed on hold to assist with recovery efforts in the wake of the Christchurch earthquake. Most recently, Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee has made an "Order in Council," based upon legislation put in place after an earthquake last year, that allows the Inland Revenue Department to share information with other government agencies until October, The New Zealand Herald reports. A spokesman for Revenue Minister Peter Dunne has noted, however, that other than the specific purposes of the order in the recovery effort, "all the usual confidentiality around tax matters will stay in place."
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STUDENT PRIVACY—CHINA

Student Survey Takes Names (March 11, 2011)

Students at Fuzhou University received a survey asking them personal and relationship questions and to respond using their names. China Daily reports that questions included "Are you dating anyone now?" and "Where is your partner from?," as well as asking about arguments they've had.  While the university maintains that a student group circulated the survey, university public relations spokesperson Ge Haixia acknowledged that the school has been trying to collect relationship information on students after a sophomore committed suicide last week. "The survey was not mandatory nor very effective," Ge said. "As you can see, most students took it as a joke."
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PRIVACY

CDT Receives 2011 IAPP Privacy Leadership Award (March 10, 2011)

The Center for Democracy and Technology has received the 2011 IAPP Privacy Leadership Award. The annual award recognizes a global leader in the field of privacy and data protection. Presenting the honor this morning at the IAPP Global Privacy Summit in Washington, DC, IAPP Board of Directors Treasurer Brendon Lynch, CIPP, said the CDT "is at the forefront of efforts to keep the Internet open, innovative and free. They have consistently been a leading voice for free expression and privacy in communications and have fostered practical and innovative solutions to public policy and civil liberties." CDT President Leslie Harris accepted the award on stage with CDT staff members Justin Brookman, Jim Dempsey and Erica Newland and CDT Board Chairman Deidre Mulligan.
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PRIVACY LAW—MALAYSIA

Prime Minister: SMS to 4 Million Didn’t Violate Privacy (March 9, 2011)

The Sun Daily reports that Malaysian Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Abdul Razak says he did not violate people's personal privacy or the data protection law when he sent Chinese New Year messages to citizens. The four million messages were sent to three telecommunications companies for transmission, he said in response to inquiries. "The Prime Minister's Office has ensured that the principle of personal data protection was not compromised and the terms and conditions of the companies were fully respected," Najib said, adding that the prime minister had no access to any of the recipients' personal data.
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Tracking Users’ Web Footprints (March 7, 2011)

A feature in The New York Times explores Web sites that track users' browser history for public viewing, questioning whether individuals will choose to share such information, which can range from visits to online dating and banking sites to exploring medical conditions, and pointing to the assurances site developers are making about privacy. "At all of these tracking sites, developers say they take privacy very seriously," Austin Considine writes in the report, adding, "their success will ultimately be predicated on trust." The developers point to such safeguards as not sharing secure links and providing options for disabling tracking. The founder of one such site suggests they make users more aware of online privacy, noting, "If we're not following you, no matter what, somebody else is." (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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GEO PRIVACY—CHINA

Mobile Phone Tracking Proposal Approved (March 4, 2011)

An expert panel has approved plans to collect real-time location data on 17 million China Mobile subscribers to help resolve Beijing's traffic problems, reports FutureGov. Under the program, phones' locations will be registered with base stations then collected, aggregated and reviewed by transportation officers and city planners. The first phase of the Beijing Real-Time Travel Information Platform is expected to roll out in June. Once the program is up and running, the government plans to send the aggregated data back to citizens to help them make smart travel decisions. While the deputy director of social development said the data would only be used for traffic control--and mobile users' privacy would be protected--the panel that approved the plan recommended linking the platform with city-management efforts in other government departments.
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BEHAVIORAL TARGETING

Fingerprinting To Supplant Cookies? (March 4, 2011)

Several startups are experimenting with tracking technologies that could supplant cookies as behavioral targeting mechanisms, ClickZ reports. Device fingerprinting operates by tracking mobile phones, PCs, TVs and cars using unique identifiers. Based on the device's properties and settings, fingerprinting allows advertisers to link to and track the device and transmit messages based on activity. It's easier to opt out of fingerprint tracking than cookies, developers say; because the device's fingerprint lasts as long as the device itself, opting-out must only happen once. In addition, the developers say, the new technology already complies with do-not-track principles because users can "opt out of both tracking and targeting independently."
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PRIVACY LAW—AUSTRALIA

Senate Passes Info Sharing Bill (March 4, 2011)

The senate passed a bill Wednesday to enable greater information sharing between government agencies, ZDNet reports. The Telecommunications Interception and Intelligence Services Legislation Amendment Bill 2010 broadens the Australian Security Intelligence Organization's scope by allowing it to share intelligence with specific government agencies in "the national interest," such as providing data on tax fraud to the taxation office rather than police, for example. The Australian Greens had previously called for an overhaul to the bill, citing concerns about such disclosures. "I think the bill will greatly expand ASIO's operations well outside the area for which it was established, which I think is something we'll regret," said Sen. Scott Ludlam.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING—AUSTRALIA

Teachers Struggle With Boundaries, Ban on Sites (March 4, 2011)

A Sydney Morning Herald article explores the challenges that social networking and school bans on such sites have presented to teachers. One study found that 86 percent of Australian schools block Facebook and 57 percent block YouTube. The article states that widespread bans are in place because the debate is focused on misuse--inappropriate online relationships between students and teachers--but many think the bans are depriving students of valuable tools. One school headmaster said, ''Part of preparing students for life is training them about how to use social networking; a policy which inhibits or restricts social networking sites may work in the short term but will not help with equipping a student with the skills for life.''
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PERSONAL PRIVACY—HONG KONG

PCPD Goes on the Road for Education (March 4, 2011)

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data (PCPD) will take a new education initiative to shopping malls throughout the month of March. According to a PCPD press release, the program aims to teach the general public about their privacy rights and provide tips on how to protect personal information. The program consists of short videos and informative materials, and a PCPD staff member will be available to answer questions.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

Facebook To Redeploy Sharing Feature (March 4, 2011)

Facebook plans to reactivate a feature allowing third-party applications to request contact information from users, reports the Otago Daily Times. Facebook suspended the feature last month after U.S. Congressmen Ed Markey and Joe Barton wrote to the company about privacy concerns. The company's vice president of global public policy said it hasn't decided "when or in what manner" the feature will be redeployed, but recent user feedback indicates improvements on the "permission screen" may be in order. Markey said he is pleased that Facebook is considering the congressmen's concerns, and encouraged Facebook to "wall off" access to teens' contact information.
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