ANZ Dashboard Digest

A new approach to notice and consent has been around for at least a couple of years now. The Microsoft whitepaper was released late 2012, and several subsequent books by privacy thought-leaders have developed this theme, which makes sense. Individuals ought to be given the opportunity to shape their profiles and to have a role in transactions involving their data, and notice and consent will no longer suffice. Equally, entities that stand to benefit from the information should protect their source if they wish to guarantee the future supply of valuable data.

If this approach is accepted, some of the stories this week indicate that there is still a long journey ahead. Whilst many entities still appear to treat privacy as a compliance issue, and one where boundaries should be pressed, others continue to succeed based on adoption of the new approach. It will be interesting to see how this divide plays out in terms of commercial success. That other old chestnut of balancing the right to information against the right to privacy also gets some play this week in the opinion piece titled “Privacy starts to bite.” To hear all about it and ask your own questions of the experts, make sure you book your place at our Privacy Awareness Week breakfast discussion on 6 May as debate on the Australian Law Reform Commission paper on serious invasions to privacy in a digital age continues.

A safe and very Happy Easter to you all,

Emma Hossack
President
IAPP ANZ

Top Australia and New Zealand Privacy News

ONLINE PRIVACY

Apps That Overshare (September 30, 2010)

According to a study conducted by Duke University, Penn State and Intel Labs, of 30 applications for the Android smartphone studied, two-thirds exhibited "suspicious handling of sensitive data." InfoWorld reports that 15 of the applications sent users' geographic location to remote advertisement servers, even if users had specified that the app only access that data to unlock location-based features. According to the study, the loophole exists because apps have only "coarse-grain controls" for accessing personal information, but few regulations over how the data can be used.
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BEHAVIORAL TARGETING

Web Analytics Code of Ethics (September 30, 2010)

The Wall Street Journal interviewed Eric Peterson and John Lovett of consulting firm Web Analytics Demystified about their efforts to create a code of ethics for Web analysts to clarify "what this stuff can be used for, and more importantly, can't be used for." The consultants credit a recent WSJ series, "What They Know," for opening their eyes to the fact that there was no "consistent platform" for the field. The pair has proposed the creation of a certification program which could grow to become a trustmark. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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PERSONAL PRIVACY

Contributing to the Digital Universe (September 23, 2010)

"In your daily life, there are dozens of ways you transmit personal information--without ever logging on to a computer," writes Jason Magder for The Montreal Gazette. Madger notes that the information acquired daily by digital television boxes, RFID chips, vehicle GPS systems, loyalty cards, credit card companies and others, amasses "digital shadows." These digital shadows make up about 70 percent of the "digital universe," according to technology consulting firm IDC's annual study measuring the size of that universe. "It's startling now how much information people can collect about you if they know how to use the right online databases and search engines," said Colin McKay of the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada.
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PRIVACY

Privacy Prime Time (September 23, 2010)

The New York Times reports on Google CEO Eric Schmidt's appearance on "The Colbert Report" Tuesday night to answer host Stephen Colbert's questions about privacy and a comment Schmidt once made about user anonymity. Schmidt told Colbert that Google does see users' online searches but forgets them "after a little while," and said his recent statement that users should change their names to achieve online anonymity was a joke, which Colbert said was "too hip for the room." (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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HEALTHCARE PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

E-Health Privacy Debate Continues (September 23, 2010)

The federal government plans to introduce shared electronic health records by July 1, 2012, The Sydney Morning Herald reports, but privacy advocates remain concerned, citing the use of 16-digit health identifiers and the potential for widespread access to patient information. Privacy advocates are concerned that the identity numbers "have been rolled out without any consent from patients and with little understanding of how they might be used," the report states, and "fear the identity number will be a magnet for 'function creep,' with future governments and even private organisations unable to resist using it as gold-standard ID in areas other than health, such as taxation or banking." Advocates of e-health note, however, that "the present system has privacy holes in it anyway."
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PRIVACY—VICTORIA

Versey Submits Annual Report (September 23, 2010)

Victorian Privacy Commissioner Helen Versey submitted her 2009-2010 Annual Report to parliament last week. In the report, Versey discusses the privacy challenges that come with new technologies, emergency response planning and publishing personal information online. "While there is a legitimate public interest in making public records more available, organisations need to be conscious that by publishing information online it becomes more readily available to those who seek personal information for illegitimate purposes--and that once published online, it is out there forever," says Versey. She encourages organisations to consult her office early on privacy-related policies and outlines complaints and inquiries that the office handled throughout the past year.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING—QUEENSLAND

Commissioner: Site “Deceptive” About Its Purpose (September 23, 2010)

ITNews reports on Queensland Privacy Commissioner Linda Matthews' recent criticism of the social networking site Facebook for promoting itself as a community where users can share and connect with others when its real goal is financial gain. "There's nothing wrong with making money; what's wrong is that it deceives potential users about that," she said, adding, "There's a big difference between choosing to share your personal information to make friends, and sharing your personal information to make someone lots of money." Speaking at an event with Matthews, Goethe University Prof. Kai Rannenberg suggested personal information is an asset and improved privacy standards are needed, while former Privacy Commissioner Malcolm Crompton, CIPP, noted the linked elements of control, trust, risk and accountability when it comes to privacy.
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DATA RETENTION—AUSTRALIA

Stallman: Data Retention is Threat to Freedom (September 23, 2010)

GNU founder and free software activist Richard Stallman spoke at the World Computer Congress in Brisbane on Tuesday, outlining issues he views as threats to IT users' freedom, reports IT News. In his keynote speech, Stallman criticized the Attorney General's plan to require telcos and ISPs to store browsing and call logs, saying that it is "never too early to debate the question of whether the government should watch all of us." Stallman also deemed surveillance, censorship, restrictive data formats and software-as-a-service barriers to IT users' freedom.
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PRIVACY

FTC Joins Privacy Authorities Forum (September 23, 2010)

New Zealand Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff has announced that the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has become the tenth member of the Asia Pacific Privacy Authorities Forum (APPA). Shroff said the FTC's decision to become a member "will immeasurably strengthen the APPA Forum and greatly facilitate the sharing of knowledge and resources between privacy authorities within the region. It is a key player in privacy protection in the largest economy in the world." The FTC is active in policy development and enforcement in areas such as Internet security, online behavioural advertising and identity fraud. APPA works to promote best practices and facilitate cross-border privacy enforcement across the Asia Pacific region, among other objectives.
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DATA PROTECTION

As Apps Multiply, How Will Privacy Apply? (September 23, 2010)

End-user software for mobile phones, or "apps," are on their way to becoming more popular than the Internet itself, some predict. Developed by teenage amateurs and billion-dollar companies alike, apps are capable of performing limitless tasks, from computing billing services to monitoring health information to forecasting the weather. But privacy advocates say apps come with risks to consumer privacy, as the data they solicit for use is managed by those who may or may not have experience in data protection or knowledge of privacy law. Some are calling for industry to get ahead of those risks, while others say the app developers themselves must take responsibility.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Cookies Slip Through Loophole (September 20, 2010)
The New York Times reports on the results of a Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) study that reveal that "large numbers of Web sites...appear to be using a loophole that circumvents Internet Explorer's ability to block cookies."

PRIVACY

TPP Seeking Research Grant Proposals (September 20, 2010)

The Privacy Projects (TPP) has announced that its Winter 2010 Research Grants competition proposals are due October 29, with awards ranging from $25,000 to $100,000 per project. According to TPP, the goal of the grant program is to "advance practical and effective research relating to information and privacy governance to inform the transition we believe is underway from traditional regulatory models to emerging frameworks of demonstrated accountability and responsibility." The TPP Board of Directors is encouraging grant applicants to submit proposals addressing such areas of emphasis as legislative reforms, organizational data governance programs and consumer privacy compliance. Questions on the program may be e-mailed to TPP.
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PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

OPC Responds to Complaints Study (September 16, 2010)

Assistant Privacy Commissioner Mark Hummerston has rejected the findings of a study that concluded the Office of the Privacy Commissioner (OPC) is slower than other agencies in responding to privacy complaints against telecommunications companies, reports ZDNet. Hummerston told ZDNet that the report didn't distinguish between different types of complaints, saying it "seems tenuous to suggest that because some privacy-related complaints can be resolved quickly under a particular act, that all privacy complaints, regardless of their complexity can be resolved in the same time frame." He expressed disappointment that the authors did not "seek information from consumers and draw evidence-based conclusions."
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ONLINE PRIVACY

When Augmented Reality Bites (September 16, 2010)

The Sydney Morning Herald reports on the emerging world of augmented reality (AR), the commercial promise of which "will almost certainly cement its future," the report states. The future market for AR apps is expected to reach into the hundreds of millions of consumers, but "how much personal information will people be prepared to give away in order to reap the rewards of amusements like these?" the report asks. ReadWriteWeb blogger Chris Cameron says consumers "need to...be more aware of what data they are sharing" and the founder of an online reputation management group says businesses must not overlook the "significant risks associated with these technologies."
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ONLINE PRIVACY—TAIWAN

Google Responds to Consumers’ Foundation (September 16, 2010)

In response to comments made at a Consumers' Foundation press conference Wednesday, Google Taiwan released a statement telling people they can file complaints and request the removal of any Street View mapping images they believe infringe on their privacy. Focus Taiwan News Channel reports that Consumers' Foundation Deputy Chairman Su Chin-hsia encouraged people not to be passive about protecting their privacy when it comes to the mapping service. Su also encouraged the National Communications Commission to draft regulations to safeguard residents' privacy, the report states. In a statement, Google said the company will review and correct controversial images as quickly as possible. Earlier this week the Czech data protection authority rejected Google's request to collect information to complete Street View mapping in that country.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Site Engineer Fired for Accessing Accounts (September 15, 2010)

A Google site reliability engineer has been fired for violating the company's privacy rules for allegedly improperly accessing accounts belonging to several teenagers, PCWorld reports. Site reliability engineers have access to databases that contain e-mails, chat logs and other files that belong to Google users, the report states. "We dismissed David Barksdale for breaking Google's strict internal privacy policies," Google Senior Vice President Bill Coughran said in a statement, noting, "We carefully control the number of employees who have access to our systems, and we regularly upgrade our security controls...That said, a limited number of people will always need to access these systems if we are to operate them properly--which is why we take any breach so seriously."
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ONLINE PRIVACY

What Should Be Forgotten, Protected? (September 15, 2010)

Privacy was one of the key policy issues discussed at the UN-sponsored Internet Governance Forum held in Lithuania this week. Larry Magid writes in The Mercury News on the event's panel on the future of privacy, the "right to be forgotten" and the discussion of whether personal information should have an expiration date. The report also looks at what Magid describes as the dichotomy in U.S. law that assigns a higher level of privacy protection to data stored on a home or office computer than to data stored on any type of Internet-based system such as Web mail. "The 'cloud' is, for all practical purposes, an extension of your desktop computer," he writes, "so providing the government with easier access to cloud data than data stored on personal hard drives makes no sense."
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PRIVACY

Protecting Customer, Employer and Supplier Privacy (September 15, 2010)

Speaking before the CSO Security Standard, GE Chief Privacy Leader and Senior Counsel Nuala O'Connor Kelly, CIPP, began with the question of what privacy is. The answer, NetworkWorld reports, is the right and ability to control how your personal information is used. With issues ranging from the privacy implications of social networking posts by employees to the use of mobile devices for both work and personal activities, companies face significant privacy challenges. "The trick for GE is the same as it is for most organizations--how to achieve security without setting off animosity someone might feel about being violated," the report states, noting O'Connor Kelly believes GE's move to create a partnership between its legal and IT security divisions has made a significant difference.
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PRIVACY

Researchers to Create a Privacy Dictionary (September 15, 2010)

Researchers at four universities in the UK are working to create an automated privacy dictionary to assist researchers studying privacy. Disputes on what criteria belong to the concept of "privacy" have hampered research thus far, according to the paper's abstract. "The lack of a clear definition or consensus on privacy, along with the need to avoid priming questions, suggests that without methodological tools that help capture a nuanced and broad perspective on privacy, privacy-related content may end up being ignored in favor of more easily coded themes," the report states.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Researchers: Promises Fall Short in Compact Policies (September 14, 2010)
The longtime tenets of know-say-do have been incorporated into the development of many privacy policies. According to the findings of a recent Carnegie Mellon University study, when it comes to the compact policies (CPs) created for the Platform for Privacy Preferences (P3P) protocol, industry may be falling short of doing what it says it is doing.

PERSONAL PRIVACY

Do Egyptian Mummies Have Privacy Rights? (September 14, 2010)

The assumption that ancient corpses are fair game for science is beginning to be challenged, NewScientist reports. The strict ethical guidelines that apply to human research don't extend to Egyptian mummies, which disturbs anatomist Frank Rühil and ethicist Ina Kaufmann of the University of Zurich, who say such research produces personal information including family history and medical conditions and doesn't allow for patient consent, the report states. The rights of the deceased individual must be considered and weighed against the knowledge attained by the research, Rühil says. Some regions classify such information as personal. In New Zealand, information about how someone died is considered personal data, and in the European Union, information about the deceased is considered personal if it can reveal something about living descendants.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Cookie Questions Persist (September 13, 2010)

The Wall Street Journal recently asked for questions from readers on technology and privacy, and a key question on many readers' minds, the report states, is, "Does deleting cookies force trackers to start over, or do they just pick up where they left off, combining the new with the old?" Jules Polonetsky, CIPP, of the Future of Privacy Forum explained that when consumers delete all cookies and later enable them, tracking companies generally can't associate the data from the newly enabled ones with the old ones. "You deleted that number that the advertising company or Web site recognizes you by," he said, explaining that when users return, "they will assign you a new number and generally are not going to have a link between the new and the old." (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

Facebook Founder Talks Privacy (September 13, 2010)

In a feature published in The New Yorker, Jose Antonio Vargas shares a conversation with Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg that touched on issues related to privacy. Referencing recent privacy controversies involving the company and its privacy settings, Vargas writes that Zuckerberg told him privacy is the "third-rail issue" online. "A lot of people who are worried about privacy and those kinds of issues will take any minor misstep that we make and turn it into as big a deal as possible," Zuckerberg reportedly said, adding, "We realize that people will probably criticize us for this for a long time, but we just believe that this is the right thing to do."
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DATA RETENTION—AUSTRALIA

Senator: Online Privacy Report Needs More Time (September 9, 2010)

Greens Sen. Scott Ludlam will propose that a senate inquiry report into data retention and online privacy be delayed when parliament next sits, CIO reports. Ludlam, who proposed the inquiry in June and aimed to have a report prepared by October 20, now says the study on the adequacy of Australians' online protection will require more time. The study will look at topics including privacy and data protection on social networking sites and companies' and government agencies' data collection practices. "It is time the parliament took a proper look at the degree to which the privacy of Australians online is being eroded by governments and corporations alike," Ludlam said. Meanwhile, the Australian Federal Police this week backed a proposal for a controversial data retention scheme.
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FINANCIAL PRIVACY—NEW ZEALAND

Credit Industry Asking Commissioner To Review Access (September 9, 2010)

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner is considering a move to "positive" credit reporting, The New Zealand Herald reports, where lenders would have access to the credit limit, providers, types and account status of individuals. Credit industry officials have submitted suggestions to the privacy commissioner to allow access to such information as part of the review of whether such companies should have additional access to user data. Currently, lenders and credit bureaux only have access to a limited amount of "negative" information, such as bankruptcy or default status.
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SURVEILLANCE—NORTHERN TERRITORY

Opinion: Commissioner Should Reconsider Decision (September 9, 2010)

A recent editorial in the NT News reflects on the "vexed" issue of personal privacy and safety in "this era of Big Brother CCTV and rampant social networking," calling for a closer look at a plan to introduce a linked system that would allow licenses to be scanned in pubs and clubs. While the proposal had been blocked by the former privacy commissioner, the editors suggest, "The protection of personal privacy is extremely important, but sometimes the greater good is even more so. This is one of those cases." The media organization is calling on Privacy Commissioner Timothy Pilgrim to reconsider the plan.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

How Much Would You Pay for Web Privacy? (September 8, 2010)

New companies aimed at helping people protect their online anonymity are facing a challenge, The Wall Street Journal reports, as many are reluctant to pay for Web privacy. With the majority of Internet users unaware of how their Web searches, posts and visits can be used by marketers and others, privacy company executives say many are uncertain about trusting their information to an unfamiliar company. As the founder of Web privacy company VaporStream put it, "Individuals don't understand the risk of privacy online." When it comes to protecting privacy online, the report states, "Overall, the Web-privacy industry remains fractured, with many free and for-purchase products tackling a range of risks. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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PRIVACY LAW—NEW ZEALAND

Commissioner Outlines Plans for New Powers (September 8, 2010)

Changes to New Zealand's privacy act will allow the privacy commissioner to ensure that personal information sent overseas to New Zealand for processing has effective protections, Voxy reports. The Privacy (Cross-border Information) Amendment Act, enacted yesterday, aims to bring the country closer to the European Union's "adequate" status when it comes to cross-border data transfers. Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff released guidelines today outlining her business approach to the new enforcement powers, the report states. "Ensuring that European business and regulators see New Zealand as a safe place for information processing is important for New Zealand's reputation. I intend to exercise the new powers in a careful and proportionate way," she said.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Q&A with Microsoft’s CPO (September 8, 2010)

The Inquirer discusses online trust with Microsoft Chief Privacy Officer Brendon Lynch, CIPP. Lynch has been part of Microsoft's privacy team since 2004. In the interview, he discusses the company's move to offer tokenized authentication. He hopes the company's U-Prove technology, which he says brought to life the bridging of offline and online identities, will be built widely into identity technologies. "There's a need for rethinking and thinking deeply about how identity is dealt with online," Lynch said. "In certain situations, you want high assurance and strong authentication--for example, healthcare, when it moves online." Lynch is on the IAPP board of directors.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Google Updates Privacy Policy, Settles Buzz Suit (September 7, 2010)

Google has reached an $8.5 million settlement in a class-action suit regarding its Buzz social-networking feature, PC Magazine reports. The agreement includes an acknowledgment that the company has addressed the privacy issues and the creation of a fund for "existing organizations focused on Internet privacy policy or privacy education," the report states. The settlement was released on the same day that the company announced it will simplify its privacy policies--cutting the length of the policies by 22 percent. "To be clear, we aren't changing any of our privacy practices," Google officials wrote in the company's official blog, noting "we want to make our policies more transparent and understandable." However, Marc Rotenberg of the Electronic Privacy Information Center is questioning whether the changes will be good for Google users. The revisions go into effect October 3.
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PRIVACY LAW—NEW ZEALAND

Parliament Passes Cross-Border Data Bill (September 7, 2010)

New Zealand lawmakers have passed a bill that could bring them closer to the European Union's coveted "adequate" status when it comes to cross-border data transfers. Scoop.co.nz reports that the New Zealand Parliament passed The Privacy (Cross-border Information) Amendment Act on August 26. "The government recognizes that in today's difficult economic environment, we need to do everything possible to improve the international competitiveness of our businesses," said Justice Minster Simon Power, who added that the new law allows businesses "to assure their international business partners that their customers' personal information will be protected by the full force of the law."
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DATA RETENTION—AUSTRALIA

Police Back Data Retention Proposal (September 7, 2010)

The Australian Federal Police (AFP) has backed a proposal for a controversial data retention scheme that aims to catch cybercriminals, ZDNet reports. Like the EU Data Retention Directive, the plan would require telecommunications providers to retain information about customers' phone calls and e-mails and may also include a requirement that they retain a record of Web sites visited. A spokesman from the AFP said police currently have the ability to lawfully obtain the information they seek, but the practice is dependent on how long service providers retain the data. "The government will ultimately make a decision in where they stand in relation to privacy and where they stand in relation to what they want," he said.
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PRIVACY LAW—NEW ZEALAND

WiFi Investigation Continues (September 3, 2010)

Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff is continuing her investigation into Google's collection of WiFi data, despite New Zealand police's determination that the company did not commit a criminal offense, 3 News reports. The police yesterday called the incident a timely reminder about WiFi security and the importance of having security measures in place. "People should not underestimate the risk that information they broadcast might be accessed by others, either inadvertently or for more sinister purposes," said a spokesman for the department's national cyber crime centre. Assistant Privacy Commissioner Katrine Evans said the investigation continues.
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BIOMETRICS—JAPAN

New Ad Displays Actually Watch Consumers (September 3, 2010)

Billboards in Japan are being replaced with flat-screen monitors with cameras and sensors to glean more information about who is looking at them, The Wall Street Journal reports. To target consumers more directly, the public displays use facial-recognition technology to determine not only how many people looked at the visual but also their gender and level of attentiveness. The technology is raising privacy concerns as Japan does not have any laws that require notification that signs are equipped with cameras or rules for handling the information captured as people pass by or stop to look, the report states. According to Yasuhiko Tajima of Sophia University and the Campaign Against Surveillance Society, privacy protection depends too much on the consciences of individual companies. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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PRIVACY LAW—HONG KONG

Chiang Considers Increased Penalties (September 3, 2010)

Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data Allan Chiang has met with representatives of the political group New Forum to hear concerns and recommendations on the collection and use of personal data for direct marketing by organizations, according to a commission press release. New Forum recommends legislation to regulate the transfer of personal data and raising the penalty for offenses of the ordinance on Personal Data Privacy. The commissioner has written to Hong Kong's monetary authority, among other government officials, to draw attention to the ordinance on marketing practices and agrees with New Forum's suggestion that the penalty for offenses should be raised, the report states.
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PRIVACY LAW—CHINA

Critics: Cell Phone Registration Invades Privacy (September 2, 2010)

A new rule requiring cell phone users to register their phone numbers by showing personal information is raising privacy concerns from critics. The Ministry of Industry and Information Technology says residents buying numbers for mobile phones must show ID cards, and foreigners must also produce their ID cards, Reuters reports. But the rule, which came into force yesterday, is seen by critics as an invasion into users' privacy and a way for the government to pry. Some fear the numbers could be sold to third parties for nefarious purposes. A commentary in the China Economic Times calls for measures to protect citizens' privacy under the new rule.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Personal Data Has a Price (September 2, 2010)

NetworkWorld reports on the view of digital personal data as bankable currency. Marc Davis of Microsoft, who is a backer of rights-based privacy, suggests that "every piece of data on the Internet maps back to who created it and who they know. Where they were when they did it, where they've been and where they plan to go. What they are interested in, attend to and interact with, and is around them and when they do these things." All this, he explains, has vast implications for privacy and the economy, he writes, noting that personal data "could be bankable and tradable from your Personal Data Bank," which would be "tied to clear, immediate and concrete benefits to choices about your personal data." Editor's Note: Read more about the concept of data banking and exchange.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

The Privacy of Ping (September 2, 2010)

Apple's Ping, a music-focused social-networking service for iTunes users, was introduced this week, and the company is promising simple and straightforward privacy controls, indicating companies are now seeing the potential for privacy as grounds on which to compete, The New York Times reports. "You can get as private or as public as you want," Apple CEO Steve Jobs said of Ping, noting the device's privacy settings are "super simple." Citing recent privacy issues for large Web and social networking companies, Marc Rotenberg of the Electronic Privacy Information Center said Jobs' remarks show "privacy is very much on the minds of companies offering social-network services," and Ryan Calo of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society suggested the comments show that companies are responding to public demands for simple privacy controls. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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ONLINE PRIVACY—INDIA

Government: Security More Important than Privacy (September 2, 2010)

Following its demand for access to encrypted Blackberry data in the country, India has said security is more important than privacy, reports News.com.ag. Research In Motion (RIM), which manufactures Blackberrys, has conceded to India's demand for lawful access to its private data to avoid a ban on the product in the country, says the report. "The government feels that security is more important than privacy," said India's home minister, adding the country will watch the progress made over the next two months. The UN said yesterday that RIM should provide India, Indonesia, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates access to Blackberry data due to legitimate security concerns.
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PRIVACY LAW—NEW ZEALAND

Street View WiFi Data Not a Crime (September 2, 2010)

New Zealand police said Google did not commit a criminal offense when it collected data from wireless networks for its Street View mapping service, AFP reports. The matter has been referred back to Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff, who alerted the police to the potential crime after Google admitted its Street View cars had collected WiFi data. "An investigation by police has determined that there is no evidence to suggest a criminal offense has been committed," said a spokesman for the New Zealand police cyber crime centre, adding that the case underlines the need for Web users to secure their wireless networks.
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DATA PROTECTION—NEW ZEALAND

Commissioner, Students Launch Educational Kit (September 2, 2010)

In conjunction with a group of secondary students, Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff has produced an educational kit about privacy for students. The kit, launched Tuesday at Mana College Porirua, emphasizes awareness, consent and appropriate use of information. Shroff said that after spending time with the children, who spend much of their time on social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, it was clear that they do care about privacy. "We were also aware that there wasn't a lot available for young people to help them protect and control their digital identities," Shroff said. "Who better to give privacy messages to young people than young people themselves?"
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Defining the Limits of Privacy (September 1, 2010)

The way we respond to the prevalence of online data will define the limits of privacy in the next decade. That is the message Daniel J. Solove shares in a report for The Chronicle of Higher Education. "The growth of information-analysis technology will have profound consequences, both good and bad," he writes, pointing to such positives as improved research and communication while cautioning that when it comes to privacy, "it will be harder for people to escape mistakes they made in the past. Big corporations and the government will be able to learn more about our lives and have more power as a result." Solove suggests that our responses and the "legal rules we develop over the next decade to cope with these developments will determine the limits of our freedom and privacy."
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

The Future of Privacy and Publicness (September 1, 2010)

Using social networking posts and media reports, Fast Company reports that "the line that separates privacy and openness remains undefined" as individuals weigh the "benefits and risks of living in public." Focusing on responses to Facebook's recent privacy-related decisions and user posts from Twitter, the report looks at the media's role in fueling discussions and debate around privacy. Following an analysis of responses and reactions to the word privacy, among other things, the report states that the push-back from people and the press can help "push things forward collaboratively" as "we are the last generations to know privacy as it was."
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