ANZ Dashboard Digest

A new approach to notice and consent has been around for at least a couple of years now. The Microsoft whitepaper was released late 2012, and several subsequent books by privacy thought-leaders have developed this theme, which makes sense. Individuals ought to be given the opportunity to shape their profiles and to have a role in transactions involving their data, and notice and consent will no longer suffice. Equally, entities that stand to benefit from the information should protect their source if they wish to guarantee the future supply of valuable data.

If this approach is accepted, some of the stories this week indicate that there is still a long journey ahead. Whilst many entities still appear to treat privacy as a compliance issue, and one where boundaries should be pressed, others continue to succeed based on adoption of the new approach. It will be interesting to see how this divide plays out in terms of commercial success. That other old chestnut of balancing the right to information against the right to privacy also gets some play this week in the opinion piece titled “Privacy starts to bite.” To hear all about it and ask your own questions of the experts, make sure you book your place at our Privacy Awareness Week breakfast discussion on 6 May as debate on the Australian Law Reform Commission paper on serious invasions to privacy in a digital age continues.

A safe and very Happy Easter to you all,

Emma Hossack
President
IAPP ANZ

Top Australia and New Zealand Privacy News

SOCIAL NETWORKING

Facebook Announces Privacy Changes, Reactions Mixed (May 28, 2010)

Reactions are mixed to Facebook's announcement yesterday of its new privacy settings, with some expressing cautious optimism and others questioning whether the changes will be sufficient, The Sydney Morning Herald reports. Canada's Assistant Privacy Commissioner Elizabeth Denham cautioned that the social networking site is still not compliant with that nation's federal privacy laws, noting the new settings still require public disclosure of user names, profile information, pictures, gender and networks. Meanwhile, Gartner analyst Ray Valdes suggests Facebook's move could affect the privacy policies of other technology companies, saying "Facebook is a very large canary in the coal mine...Competitors are watching to see how much Facebook can get away with and what are the limits that are considered acceptable by government and users."
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SOCIAL NETWORKING—AUSTRALIA

Police Call for Facebook Law Liaison (May 28, 2010)

Australian Federal Police Assistant Commissioner Neil Gaughan met with global police chiefs at the U.S. Department of Justice on Wednesday to discuss strategies to deal with "the growing number of crimes linked to Facebook," The Sydney Morning Herald reports. "What I'll be pushing for from an Australian perspective is a dedicated law enforcement liaison person in Australia," Gaughan said prior to the meeting. He also discussed the need for a "report abuse" option and age-verification software on the social networking site. Gaughan's remarks followed warnings by police urging teenagers to be aware of their privacy settings in the wake of the alleged murder of a Sydney teen by a man who created a fake Facebook profile.   
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PRIVACY LAW—NEW ZEALAND

Minister Faces More Scrutiny (May 28, 2010)

The Cabinet minister who came under scrutiny last year for disclosing single mothers' welfare income is facing new questions after disclosing certain details about the case to the New Zealand Herald. According to the report, Minister Paula Bennett recently shared details of a requested cash settlement on the case with the Herald, a move that one expert called "entirely inappropriate." Privacy lawyer John Edwards said that Bennett's release of a letter detailing one mother's remuneration request "is arguably a fresh breach of privacy." Bennett said she released the details for the sake of transparency.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING—AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND

Bank Looks Into “Creative” Debt Collection Efforts (May 28, 2010)

The Australia and New Zealand Banking Group is investigating employees' use of a social networking site to track down debtors, International Business Times reports. Bank debt collection staff created a false Facebook profile to learn more about those with outstanding personal loans and credit cards, the report states. "Our initial analysis suggests we are dealing with some grossly misplaced staff creativity rather than a venture which has produced any particular debt-collection outcomes," said bank spokesman Stephen Ries. An Electronic Frontiers Australia spokesperson said the actions constitute a breach of the Federal Privacy Act.
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PRIVACY LAW—AUSTRALIA

Increased Parliamentary Oversight Needed in E-Health (May 28, 2010)

The Australian reports that the federal Opposition plans to strengthen patient protections within the Healthcare Identifiers Bill before it reaches the Senate for debate next month. Amendments to the bill aim to increase parliamentary oversight amidst concerns from lawmakers, doctors and privacy advocates' about patient privacy. "Given the importance of this legislation, it is critical there is thorough parliamentary oversight to ensure that appropriate safeguards are in place to protect individual privacy and ensure the integrity of the e-health system," said Andrew Southcott, a Coalition spokesman.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Thuer: A Change in Legislation Needed (May 28, 2010)

According to Swiss Data Protection Commissioner Hanspeter Thuer, new rules should be put in place to regulate Internet service companies that handle sensitive personal data, reports The Age. "A change in legislation is needed...for all IT applications," Thuer told the Sonntag newspaper. "Everyone that offers applications on the market that could harm personal rights must be certified." Thuer is part of a multinational effort to discern more about Google's collection of personal data from unprotected wireless networks while taking pictures for Street View. "I am now expecting a full disclosure on what happened exactly," he said.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Google Unable to Meet Regulators’ Data Deadline (May 27, 2010)

Google will not comply with requests from regulators in Germany and Hong Kong to surrender data collected from unsecured wireless networks, citing the need to address the "legal and logistical process for making data available." The New York Times reports that Google implied German privacy laws were preventing the disclosure, but Hamburg Data Protection Supervisor Johannes Caspar said the request would not constitute "criminal behavior" so there was "no apparent reason to still withhold the data from us." According to Hong Kong Privacy Commissioner Roderick B. Woo, Google is not "taking the matter seriously enough. Unless some remedial measures are taken by Google promptly, I shall have to consider escalating the situation and resort to more assertive action." In the U.S., meanwhile, where lawsuits continue to be filed over the company's WiFi data collection, the House Committee on Energy and Commerce has sent a letter to Google seeking details on how it "accidentally collected private data." (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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ONLINE PRIVACY—U.S.

Study: Young Adults Are Most Privacy Proactive (May 27, 2010)

According to a study conducted by the Pew Internet & American Life Project, young adults are more likely to pay attention to online privacy than most people think, reports Ars Technica. The study shows that 18 to 29-year-olds keep tighter control of their online personas than any other age group. Seventy-one percent have changed their privacy settings on social networking sites and they have been consistent in this practice since 2006. Another major finding, the report states, is that no matter their age, people who are most aware of others viewing their online behavior are also the most likely to closely manage their privacy settings.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

How Facebook is Redefining Privacy (May 25, 2010)

Facebook and privacy are the subjects of the cover story for TIME Magazine's May 31 edition. Author Dan Fletcher offers an extensive look at the company and its co-founder and CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, who has come under fire recently for a continued loosening of user privacy defaults. Fletcher writes that for many people, Facebook is a second home, and goes on to examine the cultural shift that is occurring due to advancements in sharing. "Facebook has changed our social DNA," he writes, "making us more accustomed to openness." But, Fletcher continues, "the site is premised on a contradiction." It is rich in intimate opportunities, "but the company is making money because you are, on some level, broadcasting those moments online."
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ONLINE PRIVACY

The Dangers of “You Are What You Buy” Sites (May 24, 2010)

Shoppers are sharing everything from how much they paid for lunch to where they're traveling through purchase-based networking sites Blippy and Swipely, prompting privacy advocates to warn such information could be at risk. The Washington Post reports on concerns about divulging "a dangerous level of personal financial information" that could be gold for behavioral advertisers. Blippy users, for example, share details on about $1.5 million worth of transactions every week, the report states, and give the company access to credit, debit and online accounts to create purchase histories and post new transactions to the site. "Blippy already knows what you're doing with every swipe," the report states, "And friends, or strangers, can join your network and watch your money leave your wallet." (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Officials To Investigate Google Data Collection (May 21, 2010)

Australian Privacy Commissioner Karen Curtis has launched an investigation into Google's admission that it "mistakenly" collected personal data when taking photographs for its Street View mapping service, The Sydney Morning Herald reports. "At this point in our investigation, it appears that the extent of personal information collected by Google in Australia, if any, is very limited," Curtis said. "Nevertheless we regard such collection as a likely breach of the Privacy Act." Officials and advocacy groups across the globe--including Hong Kong Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data Roderick B. Woo and the government of Macao--are calling for investigations into Google's practices. Sergey Brin, the company's co-founder, has said Google "screwed up" by collecting the data, while CEO Eric Schmidt said that although privacy mistakes were made, it is a case of "No harm, no foul."
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ONLINE PRIVACY—QUEENSLAND

Police Battling Unsecured WiFi (May 21, 2010)

Queensland Police have found that half of the wireless networks in select areas are unsecured, according to Detective Superintendent Brian Hay, who said law enforcement officials "see it as a major vulnerability in this community." ZDNet Australia reported on the efforts by police just days after Google acknowledged collecting data sent over unsecured WiFi networks. Police are considering creating pamphlets to raise awareness that securing WiFi can protect individuals and small businesses so that they can "self protect" from harms such as "where they can be abused, where their data can be copied, where their lives can be intruded," Hay said.
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PERSONAL PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

CrimTrac: National Licence Photo Database Needed (May 21, 2010)

Police need better access to information, including photos from every drivers' licence in the country, according to Ben McDevitt, head of CrimTrac, the federal agency that maintains national databases of information including criminal histories, DNA and fingerprints. The Sydney Morning Herald reports that McDevitt said police cannot currently verify whether photos on licences are the same as those stored on transportation authority records or if multiple licences have been issued in different names with the same photo. McDevitt noted that it will be important to address access to information by police and privacy protection for individuals. "I think a balance can be struck," he said. "The two aren't mutually exclusive."
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STUDENT PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

IDs Revealed in Plan to Combat Racism (May 21, 2010)

The identities of about 500,000 foreign students will be provided to police across the country as part of an effort to discover whether attacks against any of the students were racially motivated, The Sydney Morning Herald reports. Australian Privacy Commissioner Karen Curtis announced this month that her office is allowing the Department of Immigration to release student names and ages, which the report states will identify current and former students from China, India, South Korea, Malaysia and the U.S., following a request by the Institute of Criminology to study whether foreign students were more likely to be victims of crime than Australians. "All personal information used for compiling and conducting this research project must be destroyed once the project is complete," Curtis said.
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HEALTHCARE PRIVACY—NEW SOUTH WALES

Officials, Academics Disagree on E-Health (May 21, 2010)

Privacy concerns about the move to electronic medical records should not outweigh the benefits of the program, according to NSW Health Deputy Director-General Tim Smyth. CIO reports that Smyth believes the privacy concerns about e-health are overstated. Meanwhile, a University of Sydney professor cautions that not enough funding is being allotted to address privacy concerns associated with e-health records. Privacy should not be an obstacle to e-health, Smyth contends, as only authorised healthcare providers may view records, and they must sign an agreement to "respect the privacy of records and to maintain confidentiality of the information." Civil Liberties Australia had previously suggested that, except in emergencies, only patients should be able to approve the use of their data.
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PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

OPC Releases Announcements on Current Issues (May 21, 2010)

The Office of the Privacy Commissioner has issued several announcements related to current and recent cases and issues. Australian Privacy Commissioner Karen Curtis has published eight new case notes involving issues related to the interpretation of the Privacy Act or associated legislation. The commissioner has also released information aimed at helping agencies and organisations better understand how to handle personal data during declared emergencies and disasters. In addition, Curtis has issued a Temporary Public Interest Determination (TPID) to allow the Department of Immigration and Citizenship to disclose a limited set of specific personal information about current and former student visa holders to all police jurisdictions and the Australian Institute of Criminology to compile a report about the victimisation rate of international students. "Significant privacy protections have been included in the TPID," she said.
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ONLINE PRIVACY—NEW ZEALAND

Expert: Digital Passports Needed for Web Safety (May 21, 2010)


An IT security expert believes New Zealand's $122 million igovt project is an example of the way governments can limit cybercrime, the New Zealand Herald reports. Eugene Kaspersky believes that "digital passports" are necessary because, on the Internet, "Unfortunately, there are too many bad guys...They know how to hide on the Internet." New Zealand's igovt program allows registered users to access various official Web sites with a single username and password, the report states, and to then have their identities verified by entering a validation code. To date, the report states, there are 10 participating agencies, including the Department of Internal Affairs, which allows registered igovt users to order copies of birth, death and marriage certificates online.
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ONLINE PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Tracking Web Users- No Cookies Necessary (May 21, 2010)

Deleting those cookies from your Web browser is not enough to protect your privacy online, an Australia-based Electronic Frontier Foundation computer scientist asserts in a paper due to be formally presented this summer. CNET News reports on Peter Eckersley's findings that modern browsers have been designed to provide Web sites with "a torrent of information thought to be innocuous" that can actually become personally identifiable when taken in combination and compared with other browsers. Eckersley said the law should treat these "browser fingerprints" as personally identifiable information and is recommending changes to ensure browsers send less information about their configuration settings to Web sites.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

Facebook Announces New Privacy Options (May 21, 2010)

Responding to backlash about recent changes to the site's default privacy settings, a Facebook official said the company will roll out new privacy options for its users in the coming weeks, Wired reports. "Now we've heard from our users that we have gotten a little bit complex," said Tim Sparapani, Facebook's head of public policy. "We are going to be providing options for users who want simplistic bands of privacy that they can choose from." The news follows criticism from Facebook users, U.S. senators, advocacy groups and Europe's Article 29 Working Party as well as pleas from Australian police after the alleged murder of a teen by a man she befriended on the site.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

MySpace Simplifies Privacy Settings (May 21, 2010)

MySpace has announced it has created simplified privacy settings for user information, the New Zealand Herald reports. The new controls include giving users the option of selecting one privacy setting for all their information as well as choosing whether to make their profile public to friends only, to all users over the age of 18 or to everyone. MySpace users also have the ability to block the sharing of their information with other Web sites or third-party applications, the report states. In disclosing the company's new policies, MySpace Co-President Mike Jones said, "While we've had these plans in the works for some time, given the recent outcry over privacy concerns in the media, we felt it was important to unveil those plans to our users now."
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BEHAVIORAL TARGETING

Study: Regulations Affect Ads’ Effectiveness (May 20, 2010)

A study conducted by marketing professors concludes that even moderate regulation impacts the effectiveness of ad targeting, reports MediaPost News. The study explored European participants' intent to purchase and compared the results with similar studies carried out in non-EU countries, concluding that online ad effectiveness in Europe is lower by more than 65 percent due to more stringent online privacy laws, the researchers say. Another academic suggests the findings may be due to greater consumer awareness in the EU about targeted ads rather than the regulations.
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PRIVACY LAW—GUAM

Senators Introduce Privacy Bill (May 18, 2010)

Lawmakers in Guam have introduced The Guam Privacy Protection Act, reports KUAM News. Senators Ray Tenorio (R) and Adolpho Palacios (D) say the bill will mirror the federal Privacy Protection Act of 1980, which regulates newsroom searches. Bill 398 comes on the heels of an incident last week involving the Guam Police Department's search of a KUAM newsroom. "This local statute...would actually provide for a penalty--not just disallow what was obtained during a search in a newsroom," Palacios said. According to Tenorio, violators will face civil and criminal penalties. The bill provides for third-degree felony charges.
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ONLINE PRIVACY

Is Tracking Users’ Favorite Kindle Passages Intrusive? (May 13, 2010)

Amazon can now track and display the book passages users most often highlight on their Kindles, raising concerns about the privacy implications of collecting and storing such information. The new feature, which is already being used by some Kindle owners, is expected to be rolled out in the weeks ahead as an automatically enabled update for Kindle's software, according to media reports, and opting out will result in the loss of the device's notes and highlights backup service. The Christian Science Monitor reports that Bnet, a business management Web site, has pointed to the possibility that publishing such information could erode consumer trust, while Amazon has stated that in sharing the highlights, it does not disclose customers' identities or information.
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HEALTHCARE PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

E-Health Records Plan Causes Privacy Concern (May 13, 2010)

The federal government is planning a major e-health initiative aimed at streamlining patient care, eliminating confusion and reducing costs, reports The Australian. The plan has drawn fresh criticism over data privacy and security, with one expert claiming that the budget allotted to address privacy is seriously insufficient. "People are worried about who will be able to look at their medical history, "said University of Sydney surgery professor Mohamed Khadra. "This small amount shows privacy is not that crucial in this context, which is wrong." Under the plan, all citizens will be given a health ID number, but will choose whether to activate the number and what, if any, information is attached to their ID number, the report states.
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ONLINE PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND

As Australia Privacy Groups Draft Letter to Google, Company Admits Collecting New Zealand Data (May 13, 2010)

Just as two Australian privacy groups were scheduled to send a letter to Google on Thursday asking the company to explain why its Street View cars are collecting Wi-Fi information and how the data will be used, the Internet company confirmed to New Zealand Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff that it has gathered data about personal wireless connections from homes there. The Sydney Morning Herald reports that the Australia Privacy Foundation and Electronic Frontiers Australia also want to know what other information the Google cars might be collecting. The company, which told the New Zealand commissioner it cannot identify individuals from the data collected, has already responded to the concerns of 10 global data protection authorities on the matter after Germany's top privacy official learned that the cars were collecting more than just photographs.
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DATA PROTECTION—NEW ZEALAND

Law Needs to Keep Up with Technology (May 13, 2010)

Law Commissioner John Burrows says his greatest nightmare is that five years from now technology will have progressed rapidly and the law will have done absolutely nothing to protect privacy, reports stuff.co.nz. Speaking during a Privacy Awareness Week event in Wellington, Burrows said, "The potential for identity theft and what hackers can do is the main worry." Google's head of privacy engineering spoke about smartphones' increased sophistication saying, "We need to have conversations about security and what checks and balances we need to have in these tools." The Law Commission is reviewing the Privacy Act, and new legislation could be drafted later this year, the report states.
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PRIVACY—AUSTRALIA

Commissioner Issues New Impact Assessment Guide (May 13, 2010)

Privacy Commissioner Karen Curtis has published a Privacy Impact Assessment Guide (PIA Guide) to help businesses responsibly handle personal information, reports CIO. "Businesses should use the PIA Guide in the early stages of any project or product they are developing which involves the handling of personal information..." said Commissioner Curtis, who launched the guide last week with Senator Joe Ludwig at a Privacy Awareness Week event in Sydney.
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PRIVACY LAW—EU

Working Party: Facebook Changes “Unacceptable” (May 13, 2010)

Following its 75th plenary session, held in Brussels this week, the Article 29 Working Party sent a letter to Facebook informing the social networking site that "it is unacceptable that the company fundamentally changed the default settings on its social networking platform to the detriment of a user," according to a press release issued Wednesday. The Working Party is calling for default settings that allow users to self-select the contacts that will be able to view their information as well as for maximum user control when it comes to third-party applications on social networks. Also at this week's session, the group met with representatives from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to exchange views on international enforcement issues.
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HEALTHCARE PRIVACY

Experts: Consequences Needed for Snoopers (May 13, 2010)

The advent of electronic health records brings new privacy concerns for healthcare facilities, especially in terms of employee snooping, says a healthcare industry consultant. HealthLeaders Media reports that Kate Borten, president of U.S.-based The Marblehead Group, says healthcare organizations should not only block employees' access to PHI, but also they should "have strict policies and penalties in place for those who snoop at patient records." Another healthcare privacy expert says the recent prison sentence handed down to a former healthcare worker who viewed patient records inappropriately sends a strong message and suggests that organizations set their own examples by firing employees caught snooping.
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

Facebook Responds to Readers’ Questions (May 12, 2010)

Last week The New York Times invited readers to submit questions for Facebook's vice president for public policy, Elliot Schrage. More than 300 readers responded to the call. In his response, Schrage expressed empathy and "professional frustration" that despite its efforts, the company has not successfully communicated with users. Schrage also moved to dispel what he described as an incorrect perception about the company's attitude towards users' privacy and discussed the company's long-term plans for monetization. In response to one reader's question about why everything is not simply set up for "opt in rather than opt out," Schrage responded, "Everything is opt-in on Facebook." (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

Service Provides Forum for Anonymous Insults (May 12, 2010)

A new social network with more than 28 million users worldwide has become "the online version of the bathroom wall in school," The New York Times reports. In the past two months, the report states, Formspring.me has become the site of choice for thousands of middle and high school students. The site allows users to answer questions without identifying themselves--prompting many to publicize cruel responses about their appearances, friends and dating habits. According to the report, a 17-year-old soccer player from New York who had received many nasty messages on the site committed suicide in March. "There's nothing positive on there, absolutely nothing," one school counselor said, "but the kids don't seem to be able to stop reading..." (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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SOCIAL NETWORKING

Nerds Unite on Privacy-Rich Social Network (May 12, 2010)

Four college students are creating a social network that differentiates on privacy, and the funds rolling in to back the project suggest a strong demand for such an offering, The New York Times reports. The creators of Diaspora* plan to freely distribute the software and will open the code so other programmers can build upon it, the report states. "In our real lives, we talk to each other," says co-creator Raphael Sofaer, describing why centralized social networks are unnecessary. "We don't need to hand our messages to a hub." The creators say the value of existing social networks "is negligible in the scale of what they are doing, and what we are giving up is all of our privacy."
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DATA PROTECTION—NEW ZEALAND

Commissioner Concerned About PSD Risks (May 6, 2010)

New Zealand's privacy commissioner has expressed concern about the potential security risks portable storage devices (PSDs) pose in the workplace following a survey that found 120 PSDs were lost or stolen within the last year. Released this week, the survey studied security controls for PSDs at 42 government agencies, finding that only half had policies for disposing of PSDs and 16 had policies on when stored data should be deleted, reports stuff.co.nz. Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff said due to significant increases in PSDs' storage capacity, agencies are exposed to data breach risks, which "can seriously damage both the reputation of the agency concerned and the trust that the public has in that agency."
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BIOMETRICS —AUSTRALIA

Commissioner Calls for Biometric Awareness, Privacy Impact Assessments (May 6, 2010)

Australian Privacy Commissioner Karen Curtis is warning CIOs at pubs and clubs to be aware of their legal obligations in collecting patrons' identity information as ID scanning, fingerprinting and iris scans become increasingly common, CIO reports. As part of Privacy Awareness Week, Curtis's office has released guidance on what businesses should consider before collecting such information. Curtis said her office continues to receive complaints from patrons and is investigating investigating venues' use of biometric technologies. "The digitized information these technologies offer has the potential to be used or disclosed for many other purposes, such as direct marketing and the creation of databases as well as the risk of facilitating identity fraud," Curtis said. She has also called on organisations to conduct Privacy Impact Assessments when looking to develop new products, services, projects or systems.
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DATA PROTECTION—AUSTRALIA

Agencies Join to Encourage Mobile Phone Safety (May 6, 2010)

Three federal agencies have joined together to encourage Australians to think about privacy and security when using their mobile phones. That's according to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner, which has joined with the Australian Communications and Media Authority and the Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy to release a pocket-sized reference guide. The guide offers tips on password security, GPS features, data deletion and software updates, among others. "Mobile phones are used for so many different things, and the amount of personal information that we store on them can be significant--particularly when you consider how easily they can be stolen or lost," said Commissioner Karen Curtis.  
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TRAVELERS’ PRIVACY

Hotels Identify Guests Through Online Reviews (May 5, 2010)

An increasing number of hotels have been finding ways to figure out who you are if you're reviewing them anonymously online, The Washington Post reports. Travel experts point out that hotels are using such online data as locations, dates and usernames to narrow down identity. "Once they find a likely match," the report states, "the review is added to a hotel's guest preference records, next to information such as frequent-guest number, newspaper choice and preferred room type." One expert suggests that with the evolution of technology, "every hotel representative could have a toolbar on his or her computer that reveals everything about a guest at the click of a mouse." (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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HEALTHCARE PRIVACY—NEW ZEALAND

High Court Clears Doctor of Wrongdoing (May 4, 2010)

The High Court at Wellington has cleared an Invercargill doctor of wrongdoing in a case involving a patient's medical information, The New Zealand Herald reports. The federal privacy commissioner had determined previously that Dr. Robert Henderson was wrong to have informed a nursing home's charge nurse that one of its employees had asked for opiates at his office. After an investigation, Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff said that the doctor should have notified the nursing home's manager only, the report states. The court disagreed. "I am a great supporter of privacy but when it comes down to the safety of people's lives you've got to have safe procedure," the doctor said.
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DATA PROTECTION—HONG KONG

Commissioner Warns Elderly Are Vulnerable (May 4, 2010)

Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data Roderick Woo Bun is warning that elderly citizens are more vulnerable to data fraud because they are less aware of the need to protect their data, The Standard reports. Woo made the comments in response to a recent Internet scam that has duped elderly people into divulging their personal information and on the heels of a University of Hong Kong survey of 400 people age 65 and older that revealed the ease with which many would relinquish their identify card number. Woo launched a campaign today to help the elderly protect their data from thieves and fraudsters.
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BEHAVIORAL TARGETING

Survey: Marketers Curtail BT Methods Due to Privacy Concerns (May 3, 2010)

A survey of marketers has revealed that privacy fears are slowing adoption of behavioral targeting methods, The New York Times reports. The Ponemon Institute surveyed 90 marketers for the independent study. Nearly all of the respondents indicated that privacy concerns had them restricting their use of the method, despite the fact that 70 percent feel the method is more effective and despite estimates on how much more lucrative it is than traditional advertising. "Privacy fears are definitely having an economic impact," said the institute's founder, Larry Ponemon, CIPP. While the advertising industry has increased its efforts to ease privacy fears, economists say "information asymmetry" is at least partially to blame for their persistence. (Registration may be required to access this story.)
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SOCIAL NETWORKING—NEW ZEALAND

Commissioner’s Survey Says…Be Aware (May 3, 2010)

According to a Privacy Commission survey, almost half of New Zealanders now have an online profile, up 32 percent from last June, reports the New Zealand Herald. The increase sparks concern about users' privacy. The study found that 57 percent of respondents consider social networks to be mostly private spaces, the report states. Privacy Commissioner Marie Shroff told the Herald that a high percentage of the users are children who "can and do give away a lot of information about themselves, without necessarily being aware of the consequences." She warned, "[Children] can risk themselves and their families by revealing personal and intimate information, which enables harms such as identity crime, stalking, text bullying and invasion of privacy in various ways."
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IDENTITY THEFT—AUSTRALIA

Commissioners Release ID Theft Tool (May 3, 2010)

Australian Privacy Commissioner Karen Curtis is kicking off Privacy Awareness Week by calling on Australians to take practical steps to protect their privacy. Partnering with the Asia Pacific Privacy Authorities, the commissioner's office has released an online tool allowing individuals to assess their risk of identity theft. "Identity theft is an area of increasing concern and this easy-to-use tool will help people understand how at risk they may be," the commissioner said. Themed "Privacy, it's in your hands," the week aims to raise awareness about privacy rights and educate people on how to protect their personal information.
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