Privacy Advisor

Summer Reads: Privacy pros turn the pages

July 1, 2011

The Privacy Advisor asked privacy pros about their personal and professional reading preferences. Responses covered a disparate and diverse span of text, including fiction, privacy textbooks, philosophy and even an early hacker article. 

Here’s what they said.

Merri Beth Lavagnino, CIPP, CIPP/IT
Chief Privacy Officer and Compliance Coordinator
 Indiana University

Q: You know someone who is aspiring to get into the privacy profession. What book(s) would you recommend to help prepare her for the field?

Merri Beth Lavagnino: If you are interested in the information privacy field, one book that will really help set the stage conceptually is Daniel Solove’s Understanding Privacy, Harvard University Press, 2008. You will get plenty about the hands-on tactics that are used by privacy professionals. It also sets out a “taxonomy of privacy” that helps you think about any situation, project, or product you are evaluating and to identify any privacy harms that may exist. After you’ve read that, read the Generally Accepted Privacy Principles from the AICPA and CICA, August 2009, to see what principles privacy professionals apply to harms in order to address them. Using these two sources, you will almost always be able to think through and figure out a way for the business to do what it needs to do, while still respecting privacy.

 

Kathleen Street, CIPP
Privacy Officer/Risk Manager
Children’s of Alabama

Q: You know someone who is aspiring to get into the privacy profession. What book(s) would you recommend to help prepare him for the field?

A: Absolutely Information Privacy: Official Reference Guide for the CIPP by Peter P. Swire, CIPP, and Sol Bermann, CIPP. I think it’s a must have for anyone interested in the privacy field. So well worth it! And, extra bonus…it also can help prepare you for the CIPP—an essential certification of distinction. 

Q: What are you reading now?

A: Philosophy of Mind by Dr. George Graham, a professor specializing in cognitive philosophy. I promised the author I would read it eventually. By the way, he also happens to be my father!  

 

Luis Salazar, CIPP
Partner
Infante, Zumpano, Hudson & Miloch, LLC

Q: What is the book that most influenced your views on privacy?

A: The text that most influenced my views on privacy is Smashing the Stack for Fun and Profit. This is an early hacker article by Aleph One on exploiting buffer overflows. It made me realize that there will always be very talented individuals constantly trying to find new and creative ways to break into systems to get private data.

 Q: What is on your summer reading list?

A: Robopocalypse: A Novel. This science fiction thriller is about the rise of robot technology against the human race. There may be some lessons for privacy pros in there but it mostly sounds like fun.


David Morgan, CIPP, CIPP/C
Privacy Lead
Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Health Information

Q: What is the privacy book you think everyone should read?

A: My privacy “must read” is Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card. The book opens with the main character having a thought-monitoring device removed from his body. It also has undertones of Internet privacy. I’ve read it about four times.

Q: What is on your summer reading list?

A: My summer reading list includes The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood. I have seen the movie but never read the book. Lots of personal privacy issues in that one.

 

Mark Thompson, CIPP/E
Associate Director
Concentium

Q: You know someone who is aspiring to get into the privacy profession. What book(s) would you recommend to help prepare him for the field?

A: In order to acquire a fundamental grounding in the privacy basics, you can do no better than the IAPP study manuals for the various Certified Information Privacy Professional credentials. There are many books that then allow you to build on this base. I particularly like Understanding Privacy by Daniel J. Solove, which is easy to read and provides an interesting analysis of privacy fundamentals, including some real-world challenges. For a more thought-provoking read, Virtual Shadows by Karen Lawrence Öqvist explores the impacts of Web 2.0 and the impact of changes in privacy on our society.

Q: What book do you wish you had written?

A: Any of the books by John Grisham. He is able to articulate complex legal matters in a way millions of people can understand, which is one of the key skills we find critical when working with our clients.

Melissa Krasnow, CIPP
Partner
Dorsey & Whitney

Q: What’s on your summer reading list?

A: Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, Amy Chua

 

 

Camille McQuay, CIPP, CIPP/E
Vice President – Research
Nymity, Inc.

Q: What’s on your summer reading list?

A: My summer reading will include: U.S. Government Privacy – Essential Policies and Practices for Privacy Professionals and the Nymity Corporate Compliance Handbook.