Privacy Advisor

IAPP in the News

January 1, 2008
The IAPP's Peter Kosmala Speaks Before InfoSecurity Pros

During a recent (ISC)2 SecureBoston conference in Quincy, Mass., industry experts stressed the importance of aligning the privacy and security resources within an organization — especially in the area of devising an effective breach response plan. SearchSecurity.com covered the event, highlighting comments from IAPP Assistant Director, Peter Kosmala, CIPP.
According to the article, Kosmala noted that, "With the growing data breach threat, privacy and security officers must work closer than ever before and accept the fact that they are partners." The talk focused on ways for security and privacy officers to build better dialogue — specifically to find a common ground on data breach response plans.

During the event, Kosmala pointed to Marriott International as an example of the best way to unite privacy and security to build a more effective defense. He said that Chris Zoladz, CIPP, Vice President, Information Protection & Privacy for Marriott International and an IAPP Board member, explained to him that privacy and security teams in his company interact daily, with the privacy officer considered the "business owner" of privacy needs while the security officer develops and oversees the best approaches to address those needs. Kosmala emphasized that this kind of collaboration naturally fuels advancements in skills, ideas and credentials on both teams, according to the article.
To read the complete article, log on to SearchSecurity.com.

Washington Internet Daily Touts Practical Privacy Series

In its "Agencies" news section, Washington Internet Daily highlights Marc Groman's keynote last month at the IAPP's Practical Privacy Series: Government, in Washington, D.C. Groman is quoted as saying, "Technology is a huge part of privacy, but it's not just a technology issue." He also encouraged government chief privacy officers to create a culture of privacy and security within their agencies, and cited agency ties to contractors that handle sensitive data as one of the biggest challenges for privacy officers, according to the brief.