Posted in: Privacy Law

Global News Roundup

In the U.S., guidelines and court rulings have offered insight on everything from drone use to workplace audio recordings, while, internationally, questions still loom about the future of Safe Harbor and national leaders have presented an Internet privacy resolution to the UN. Kazakhstan’s privacy law is scheduled to come into effect this month, and Indonesia is looking into consolidating its sectoral coverage into an overarching law. Also in this week’s roundup is analysis of India’s privacy bill, California’s spate of privacy laws and insight from the FTC and the New Jersey Attorney General’s Office on how to avoid the wrath of regulators.

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Global News Roundup

While much of the news was focused on the EU Data Protection Regulation this week, a few other things of note happened in the legal realm as well. For example, the EU Parliament adopted a resolution to suspend SWIFT based on allegations that the U.S. NSA had access to EU citizen’s bank data; the FTC reached a settlement with Aaron’s, Inc., over the company’s consumer spying regime, and in Ecuador there are concerns that a new penal code could violate citizens’ online privacy. These are just a few of the stories—in addition to information on the LIBE vote and the future of Safe Harbor and the EU regulation—in this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup.

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Global News Roundup

This week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup highlights changing privacy laws from the U.S. to Bahrain. Revisions to the U.S. Telephone Consumer Protection Act went into effect last week; the European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs will vote today on amendments to the proposed regulation and directive—including one that would see U.S. companies seeking permission from EU officials before complying with government access requests to EU data, and the Bahrain cabinet has preliminarily approved a data protection law. Meanwhile, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office is considering jail time for breaches at the same time as justifying its fining practices.

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The LIBE Vote on EU Data Protection: What, Exactly, Happens on Monday?

By Emily Leach, CIPP/US

The European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE) has scheduled votes on the reports on the revised data protection regulation and directive for Monday in Strasbourg. This post notes outlines the steps that come after Monday’s vote in order to create a new data protection law in the EU and offers insight into what EU privacy pros are saying about the likely outcome.

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IAPP Westin Research Center

What Do the New Disclosure Requirements Under CalOPPA Mean for Your Business?

By Dennis Holmes, IAPP Westin Research Fellow

On Friday, September 27, Governor Jerry Brown signed into law California Assembly Bill 370 (A.B. 370), which amends the California Online Privacy Protection Act  (CalOPPA) requiring businesses to disclose how they respond to Do Not Track (DNT) signals. The new law, which is the first to officially address the DNT mechanism endorsed by the Federal Trade Commission and debated by industry, presents...

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global News Roundup

While U.S. regulators mull over the need for rules surrounding drone use by law enforcement, Montana’s new gun owner healthcare privacy law went into effect and California continues to shape privacy law moving toward a “presumption of harm” in breach cases, but one op-ed claims its “revenge porn” law doesn’t do enough. A Zimbabwean law established a central SIM card database, and Australia’s information commissioner has released a best practice guide for app developers. This weekly roundup offers information on all these issues and more, including what regulators had to say at both the IAPP Privacy Academy and the 35th International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners.

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California Continues to Shape Privacy and Data Security Standards

By The Hogan Lovells Privacy Team

Recently enacted privacy legislation in California reminds us that it is not new for that state to lead the charge in developing privacy and data security standards in the United States. California was one of the first states to provide an express right of privacy in its constitution. In 2002, California became the first state to enact breach-notification legislation; 45 states, the District of...

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Global News Roundup

This week, read about California’s continued push towards privacy protections including Gov. Jerry Brown signing into law an amendment to the California Online Privacy Protection Act that requires websites to disclose in privacy policies how they react to Do-Not-Track signals, the passing of the “eraser law” and movement on a bill that would extend the employee social media law to public agencies. Meanwhile, a Minnesota court has determined the state is not responsible for an employee’s alleged inappropriate accessing of driver’s license records, and the Fourth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled in favor of a former Virginia deputy sheriff saying his Facebook “Like” is protected by the First Amendment. Plus, read about legislative activity in the EU, Singapore, Australia and South Africa.

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Global News Roundup

U.S. Courts and states have been taking things into their own hands in terms of privacy law these days, and this week is no exception. While recent cases have mainly tackled the Stored Communications Act, this week’s news highlights a court decision upending the way the Telephone Consumer Protection Act has been interpreted. California continues to push forward privacy bills, with the “eraser law” that would allow youths to erase misguided posts, and while industry and regulators clash on the EU data protection law’s timeline, France is pushing the EU to adopt a plan that would see non-EU tech firms regulated and taxed based on where their websites are used.

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Global News Roundup

A U.S. District Court cited the Stored Communications Act as protecting “friend-only” posts on Facebook; one expert questions whether the False Light Tort is still relevant, and Apple’s new fingerprint authentication could bring up interesting questions about invoking the Fifth Amendment when it comes to accessing biometrically protected data and devices. Plus, more on HIPAA, California’s leading role in privacy legislation, breach notification in the EU and Brazil’s struggle to pass a privacy law.

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