Posted in: Surveillance

Global News Roundup

Looking at the federal and state bills being introduced in the U.S., this Privacy Tracker weekly roundup reports on lawmakers’ efforts to get privacy-protecting laws on the books; however, FTC Commissioner Maureen Ohlhausen has called for legislators to look to existing laws, saying “We simply do not need new talk, new laws or new regulations.” Also take a look at new compliance hurdles for organizations in Canada and Australia as new laws are set to roll out in those countries. Also, in the EU, the LIBE has published amendments it would like to see in the Network and Information Security Directive.

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States Respond to Citizens’ Surveillance Concerns

By Emily Leach, CIPP/US

While states don’t have the authority to shut down National Security Agency surveillance, many state lawmakers are doing their best to enact legislation that will put limits on state and local law enforcement’s abilities. From cellphone location data to drones, online browsing to license-plate scanning, coast to coast and left to right, state lawmakers are proposing anti-surveillance laws. This Privacy Tracker roundup offers a glimpse of what’s coming down the pike.

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Global News Roundup

This week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup includes legislation introduced in both Missouri and Kansas aiming to protect electronic communications and data from government intrusion. This comes after an Arizona representative announced she will propose legislation to effectively ban the National Security Agency from that state. The roundup also includes news of Pennsylvania considering an expansion of its DNA collection to those arrested for felonies and misdemeanors that require registration as sex offenders and the release of a new draft of the Data Protection Bill in the Cayman Islands.

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Global News Roundup

In this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup, see BakerHostetler’s year-in-review on international privacy laws and read about cases you may have missed while enjoying the holiday season. For example, a U.S. District Court has deemed a Florida drug-screening law unconstitutional; U.S. Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler ruled in the Hulu privacy lawsuit that no proof of injury is needed for viewers to recover damages, and the U.S. Federal Trade Commission settled with Accretive Health over the company’s failure to protect consumer data. Also, read about the contradicting rulings over the NSA’s data collection practices.

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Global News Roundup

While much happened this week in privacy news; the NSA’s surveillance was deemed likely unconstitutional, consent was declared dead, the data broker industry was put on notice by a U.S. senator and the EDPS released its 2014 inventory, the news that hit home for us was that Peter Fleischer and two other Google executives were acquitted in Italy’s Supreme Court after an eight-year battle over whether they were legally responsible for content that users uploaded to Italy’s version of YouTube. Back in the day, the implications of this case were a little scary for privacy pros around the globe, and it seems now it’s finally over. Take a look at this and all the week’s developments in privacy law in this Privacy Tracker weekly roundup.

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Unpacking the Klayman Decision That May End Bulk Metadata Collection

By Andrew Serwin, CIPP/US, CIPP/E, CIPP/G

On December 16, the District Court in the District of Columbia issued an opinion finding that the NSA program that has gotten significant attention due to the revelations of Edward Snowden was likely unconstitutional. In Klayman v. Obama, five plaintiffs sued a variety of government officials as well as private companies and sought preliminary injunctive relief based upon the assertion that the NSA program was unconstitutional and violated other statutes. In what ended up making big news, the court concluded there was a substantial likelihood the plaintiffs would prevail on their Fourth Amendment claims and issued an injunction. In this article, Andrew Serwin unpacks the court’s decision.

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Global News Roundup

France is receiving criticism for a new law expanding government agencies’ access to Internet data; a European Court of Justice advocate has deemed the data retention directive in violation of citizens’ fundamental privacy rights, and in the U.S., a petition to update the Electronic Communications Privacy Act has received more than 100,000 signatures. This week, Privacy Tracker reports on these developments as well as new administrative measures for Chinese credit reference agencies, U.S. states’ challenges to NSA surveillance and new fining powers for the Dutch data protection authority.

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Global News Roundup

From the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA), regulators are asserting themselves in consumer privacy issues. This Privacy Tracker weekly legislative roundup offers information on the FTC’s settlement with a flashlight app developer, as well as its plans for the upcoming year, and the Dutch DPA’s findings in its investigation of Google’s privacy policy. Meanwhile, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office announced that pending new pan-Europe legislation will result in significant budget losses, causing it to restructure; some are calling U.S. state attorneys general the most important privacy regulators in the country, and BC Information and Privacy Commissioner Elizabeth Denham is recommending the government amend the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

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Global News Roundup

This week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup includes the IAPP’s coverage of the European Commission’s report critiquing the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor agreement and offering the U.S. 13 ways to save it, and insight from Eduardo Ustaran, CIPP/E, on the report. You’ll also find information on the United Nation’s approval of an unlawful surveillance resolution, why India may have to wait a little longer for a privacy law and South Africa’s new law. In the U.S., more regions are considering social media laws and DNA databases, and courts have decided cases relating to COPPA and consumer privacy.

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Global News Roundup

The Supreme Court of Canada, in a unanimous ruling, has determined that the Alberta privacy law is unconstitutional and has given the province one year to amend it; A federal judge in Vermont has ruled there can be no expectation of privacy when it comes to data exposed online via a peer-to-peer file-sharing network, and the New Zealand Parliament has voted down a bill that would have given the privacy commissioner increased powers. Meanwhile, the FTC has asserted its power over parental-consent methods, Brazil is calling for a crackdown on government surveillance and Italy’s data protection authority and intelligence department have entered into a cooperation protocol. This week’s Privacy Tracker roundup has these stories and more.

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