Posted in: Surveillance

Global News Roundup

The Dutch Parliament has approved the use of drones for video surveillance, giving mayors the right to determine when the use is appropriate; meanwhile, in the U.S., Washington state’s governor vetoed a drone bill there, saying it doesn’t go far enough to protect privacy. This week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup offers information on Idaho’s new DNA privacy law, Utah’s new mobile device privacy law and clarification on TCPA issued by the Federal Communications Commission. Also learn about the one-million Euro fine Google will pay to Italian regulators and a suit in Canada seeking class-action status that claims the Communications Security Establishment Canada “has been violating the constitutional rights of millions of Canadians.”

You may need to be an IAPP member and be logged in to read the full article.
Log in now or click here to learn more about IAPP membership.

Is Drone Privacy Ready for Take Off?

By The Hogan Lovells Privacy Team

The expected uptick in public and private use of unmanned aerial systems (UAS) in the U.S. has brought on a requisite increase in legislation in this area—both passed and proposed. “In 2013, 13 states passed laws governing UAS operations, and three states—Idaho, Oregon and Texas—enacted laws that specifically address UAS use by private entities,” write Hogan Lovells’ Partner Harriet Pearson, CIPP/US, and Associate Jared Bomberg in this Privacy Tracker post, leaving UAS operators with “a patchwork of state laws impacting their operations.” The authors outline scenarios for the future of drone regulation in the U.S., taking into account current applicable privacy laws, Sen. Ed Markey’s (D-MA) proposal and the possibility for self-regulation.

You may need to be an IAPP member and be logged in to read the full article.
Log in now or click here to learn more about IAPP membership.

Global News Roundup

With the Australian Privacy Principles in effect, the data protection regulation vote in the European Parliament and the announcement of the announcement of the G29 and APEC announcing a joint agreement aiming to aid companies in achieving compliance with global data transfers, it’s been a busy couple of weeks. Privacy Tracker has the information you need on the latest action, plus updates to U.S. state and federal initiatives and some opinions on where privacy law is headed. Looking forward to March Madness? U.S. Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO) is hoping that Congress is, too, and that his latest plea will help get support for the E-mail Privacy Act.

You may need to be an IAPP member and be logged in to read the full article.
Log in now or click here to learn more about IAPP membership.

Global News Roundup

While U.S. federal lawmakers struggle to find the right balance on data breach notification, state legislators are offering up bills to protect consumers from tracking through cellphones, smart meters and license plates, and one company is pushing back against Utah’s license-plate privacy law, saying it infringes on First Amendment rights. This Privacy Tracker weekly roundup covers all this and more, including the FTC, G29 and APEC announcement of a cross-border data transfer tool at the IAPP’s Global Privacy Summit last week and the Mexican DPA’s warning of an “abundance” of fines to come.

You may need to be an IAPP member and be logged in to read the full article.
Log in now or click here to learn more about IAPP membership.

Global News Roundup

Senators in Florida and Illinois are proposing bills to limit surveillance and police access to data; the Texas Court of Appeals has expanded cellphone privacy rights, and the Washington State Supreme Court has ruled citizens have the right to privacy in the text messages sent from their mobile devices. Meanwhile, the U.S. government has entered an agreement with Japan allowing the countries to share fingerprints of suspected terrorists to be matched against each other’s databases, and the U.S. Department of Justice is asking the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court for longer retention periods for certain data. Read about these developments and more in this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup.

You may need to be an IAPP member and be logged in to read the full article.
Log in now or click here to learn more about IAPP membership.

Global News Roundup

In this Privacy Tracker weekly legislative roundup, read about the prospects of German advocacy groups getting the right to sue businesses, the status of the Philippines’ cybercrime law and proposals in the U.S. pushing for less data collection and more consumer protections. The Utah attorney general has stopped using administrative subpoenas for cellphone and Internet data, saying “writing yourself a note to go after that stuff without any check is too dangerous,” while the Senate looks at a bill that would mean law enforcement needs a judge’s order as well. Also, Orin Kerr has published an article supposing what a communication privacy act might look like if the U.S. scrapped ECPA and started from scratch, and there’s a handy interactive map outlining the status of social media privacy laws throughout the U.S.

You may need to be an IAPP member and be logged in to read the full article.
Log in now or click here to learn more about IAPP membership.

Global News Roundup

Nigeria and Turkey are both considering government-proposed legislation that would require service providers to turn over to law enforcement customers’ data upon request—with fines, and possible jail time for executives, for noncompliance in Nigeria. In the U.S., senators are addressing breach response and online privacy concerns with bills of their own as the fallout continues from the Target and Neiman Marcus breaches as well as the Snowden revelations. And in Australia, the deadline for the Australian Privacy Principles looms large. The Privacy Tracker’s weekly legislative roundup covers all this and more.

You may need to be an IAPP member and be logged in to read the full article.
Log in now or click here to learn more about IAPP membership.

Global News Roundup

In the U.S., eight states have been in the news for movement on drone legislation. While most are fairly similar, bills in California and Utah put restrictions on use and retention of the data, and one of the two drone bills in front of the Georgia House focuses on a 100-foot “protected zone.” In Montana, a suicide review board has been given authorization to begin looking into the healthcare records of suicide victims in an attempt to lower the incidents in the state, causing some privacy concerns. And Maine has opted for a study instead of furthering a social media privacy bill. Read about these developments and more in this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup.

You may need to be an IAPP member and be logged in to read the full article.
Log in now or click here to learn more about IAPP membership.

Global News Roundup

While industry leaders at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, called for new rules surrounding data protection, the U.S. Supreme Court announced it will hear two cases involving warrantless searches by law enforcement of suspects’ cellphones. And, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission announced settlements with 12 companies over false claims of alignment with Safe Harbor rules. In this Privacy Tracker roundup, learn about these as well as bills being considered by U.S. state legislatures, how Obama’s NSA plans may affect EU law and more.

You may need to be an IAPP member and be logged in to read the full article.
Log in now or click here to learn more about IAPP membership.

Global News Roundup

Looking at the federal and state bills being introduced in the U.S., this Privacy Tracker weekly roundup reports on lawmakers’ efforts to get privacy-protecting laws on the books; however, FTC Commissioner Maureen Ohlhausen has called for legislators to look to existing laws, saying “We simply do not need new talk, new laws or new regulations.” Also take a look at new compliance hurdles for organizations in Canada and Australia as new laws are set to roll out in those countries. Also, in the EU, the LIBE has published amendments it would like to see in the Network and Information Security Directive.

You may need to be an IAPP member and be logged in to read the full article.
Log in now or click here to learn more about IAPP membership.