Posted in: Children's Privacy

Global News Roundup

Privacy laws are being considered in nations across the globe, and this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup has updates on many of them. Brazil’s Chamber of Deputies has passed the Internet bill of rights—without its controversial local data storage provision; India has exempted government intelligence agencies from its draft law; Australia’s Senate is looking at a mandatory breach notification bill, and in Ireland, a bill intending to give adopted children identity rights is raising questions over parental privacy rights. In the U.S., Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) has proposed an updated version of his location privacy bill, and states continue to discuss issues surrounding student privacy and breach notification, among others.

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Global News Roundup

In this Privacy Tracker weekly legislative roundup, read about the prospects of German advocacy groups getting the right to sue businesses, the status of the Philippines’ cybercrime law and proposals in the U.S. pushing for less data collection and more consumer protections. The Utah attorney general has stopped using administrative subpoenas for cellphone and Internet data, saying “writing yourself a note to go after that stuff without any check is too dangerous,” while the Senate looks at a bill that would mean law enforcement needs a judge’s order as well. Also, Orin Kerr has published an article supposing what a communication privacy act might look like if the U.S. scrapped ECPA and started from scratch, and there’s a handy interactive map outlining the status of social media privacy laws throughout the U.S.

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A Closer Look at the San Francisco City Attorney’s Suit Against Social Media App Maker MeetMe

By Stephen Satterfield

Earlier this month, San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera filed a complaint in California state court against MeetMe, Inc., the maker of a social networking app that, as the complaint puts it, is designed “to introduce users to new people and enable them to interact with strangers online and in person.” The complaint takes issue with one of the ways MeetMe encourages users to interact—by...

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Global News Roundup

In this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup, see BakerHostetler’s year-in-review on international privacy laws and read about cases you may have missed while enjoying the holiday season. For example, a U.S. District Court has deemed a Florida drug-screening law unconstitutional; U.S. Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler ruled in the Hulu privacy lawsuit that no proof of injury is needed for viewers to recover damages, and the U.S. Federal Trade Commission settled with Accretive Health over the company’s failure to protect consumer data. Also, read about the contradicting rulings over the NSA’s data collection practices.

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Will GAO Report Spur Action from Congress?

By The Hogan Lovells Privacy Team

Last year, U.S. Senate Commerce Committee Chairman Jay Rockefeller asked the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to investigate privacy issues pertaining to companies that collect, aggregate and sell personal information about consumers. In late November, the GAO publicly released the resulting report, “Information Resellers: Consumer Privacy Framework Needs to Reflect Changes in Technology and the Marketplace.” What did the GAO examine, and, in the short term, how might Congress respond to the GAO’s findings and, when they are published, Senator Rockefeller’s own scheduled report?

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Global News Roundup

This week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup includes the IAPP’s coverage of the European Commission’s report critiquing the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor agreement and offering the U.S. 13 ways to save it, and insight from Eduardo Ustaran, CIPP/E, on the report. You’ll also find information on the United Nation’s approval of an unlawful surveillance resolution, why India may have to wait a little longer for a privacy law and South Africa’s new law. In the U.S., more regions are considering social media laws and DNA databases, and courts have decided cases relating to COPPA and consumer privacy.

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Global News Roundup

The Supreme Court of Canada, in a unanimous ruling, has determined that the Alberta privacy law is unconstitutional and has given the province one year to amend it; A federal judge in Vermont has ruled there can be no expectation of privacy when it comes to data exposed online via a peer-to-peer file-sharing network, and the New Zealand Parliament has voted down a bill that would have given the privacy commissioner increased powers. Meanwhile, the FTC has asserted its power over parental-consent methods, Brazil is calling for a crackdown on government surveillance and Italy’s data protection authority and intelligence department have entered into a cooperation protocol. This week’s Privacy Tracker roundup has these stories and more.

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California Continues to Shape Privacy and Data Security Standards

By The Hogan Lovells Privacy Team

Recently enacted privacy legislation in California reminds us that it is not new for that state to lead the charge in developing privacy and data security standards in the United States. California was one of the first states to provide an express right of privacy in its constitution. In 2002, California became the first state to enact breach-notification legislation; 45 states, the District of...

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Global News Roundup

This week, read about California’s continued push towards privacy protections including Gov. Jerry Brown signing into law an amendment to the California Online Privacy Protection Act that requires websites to disclose in privacy policies how they react to Do-Not-Track signals, the passing of the “eraser law” and movement on a bill that would extend the employee social media law to public agencies. Meanwhile, a Minnesota court has determined the state is not responsible for an employee’s alleged inappropriate accessing of driver’s license records, and the Fourth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled in favor of a former Virginia deputy sheriff saying his Facebook “Like” is protected by the First Amendment. Plus, read about legislative activity in the EU, Singapore, Australia and South Africa.

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Global News Roundup

U.S. Courts and states have been taking things into their own hands in terms of privacy law these days, and this week is no exception. While recent cases have mainly tackled the Stored Communications Act, this week’s news highlights a court decision upending the way the Telephone Consumer Protection Act has been interpreted. California continues to push forward privacy bills, with the “eraser law” that would allow youths to erase misguided posts, and while industry and regulators clash on the EU data protection law’s timeline, France is pushing the EU to adopt a plan that would see non-EU tech firms regulated and taxed based on where their websites are used.

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