Posted in: Geo Privacy

Global News Roundup

In the U.S., Kentucky has become the 47th state to pass a breach notification bill and Wisconsin has passed a social media law and expanded the collection of DNA from arrested individuals. The U.S. House passed bipartisan legislation aiming to protect information held in vehicle event data recorders; the Canadian Senate is considering the Digital Privacy Act, offering new protection for consumers and increased powers for the federal privacy commissioner, and the Court of Justice of the EU invalidated the EU Data Retention Directive. In this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup, read more about all these developments and also what the FTC v. Wyndham decision may, or may not, mean for the future of U.S. privacy regulation.

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Global News Roundup

From the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA), regulators are asserting themselves in consumer privacy issues. This Privacy Tracker weekly legislative roundup offers information on the FTC’s settlement with a flashlight app developer, as well as its plans for the upcoming year, and the Dutch DPA’s findings in its investigation of Google’s privacy policy. Meanwhile, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office announced that pending new pan-Europe legislation will result in significant budget losses, causing it to restructure; some are calling U.S. state attorneys general the most important privacy regulators in the country, and BC Information and Privacy Commissioner Elizabeth Denham is recommending the government amend the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

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Global News Roundup

In this week’s Privacy Tracker Global News Roundup, read about court decisions, hearings and proposals that may affect the future of privacy legislation in the U.S.; the declaration by the UK Information Commissioner’s Office that one town violated privacy law with its use of traffic cameras; China’s latest privacy rule, and a United Arab Emirates law that forbids photographing or videoing another individual without their permission.

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