Posted in: Data Retention

Canadian Cyberbullying and Lawful Access Legislation Revived

By Timothy M. Banks

In this Privacy Tracker post, Timothy Banks of Dentons Canada looks at the government’s proposed Bill C-13, which attempts to grant law enforcement enhanced surveillance powers. “The proposed legislation has been promoted by the government as ‘anti-cyberbullying’ legislation; however, the new offence of unlawful distribution of intimate images is a small component of a suite of provisions intended to expand law enforcement tools to investigate online crime.” Noting that previous attempts at increasing surveillance powers have met criticism from federal and provincial privacy commissioners, Banks writes that this bill “is much more respectful of privacy rights than previous attempts by Canada’s Harper government. However, the recent attempt to stifle debate in the House of Commons certainly could be interpreted as the government remaining uncomfortable with scrutiny of these provisions.”

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Global News Roundup

In the U.S., Kentucky has become the 47th state to pass a breach notification bill and Wisconsin has passed a social media law and expanded the collection of DNA from arrested individuals. The U.S. House passed bipartisan legislation aiming to protect information held in vehicle event data recorders; the Canadian Senate is considering the Digital Privacy Act, offering new protection for consumers and increased powers for the federal privacy commissioner, and the Court of Justice of the EU invalidated the EU Data Retention Directive. In this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup, read more about all these developments and also what the FTC v. Wyndham decision may, or may not, mean for the future of U.S. privacy regulation.

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Global News Roundup

Senators in Florida and Illinois are proposing bills to limit surveillance and police access to data; the Texas Court of Appeals has expanded cellphone privacy rights, and the Washington State Supreme Court has ruled citizens have the right to privacy in the text messages sent from their mobile devices. Meanwhile, the U.S. government has entered an agreement with Japan allowing the countries to share fingerprints of suspected terrorists to be matched against each other’s databases, and the U.S. Department of Justice is asking the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court for longer retention periods for certain data. Read about these developments and more in this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup.

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Global News Roundup

In this Privacy Tracker legislative roundup, read about privacy concerns related to Brazil’s proposed Internet privacy law and one Turkey’s president recently signed into law, and get some insight on complying with South Africa’s new law. In the U.S., states are moving along bills to prevent revenge porn in Illinois and protect readers’ privacy in New Jersey and student privacy in Wyoming and Kansas, among others. Also, the Massachusetts Supreme Court has determined that police need to get a warrant in order to collect cellphone location data over a period of time.

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Global News Roundup

In the U.S., eight states have been in the news for movement on drone legislation. While most are fairly similar, bills in California and Utah put restrictions on use and retention of the data, and one of the two drone bills in front of the Georgia House focuses on a 100-foot “protected zone.” In Montana, a suicide review board has been given authorization to begin looking into the healthcare records of suicide victims in an attempt to lower the incidents in the state, causing some privacy concerns. And Maine has opted for a study instead of furthering a social media privacy bill. Read about these developments and more in this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup.

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Global News Roundup

France is receiving criticism for a new law expanding government agencies’ access to Internet data; a European Court of Justice advocate has deemed the data retention directive in violation of citizens’ fundamental privacy rights, and in the U.S., a petition to update the Electronic Communications Privacy Act has received more than 100,000 signatures. This week, Privacy Tracker reports on these developments as well as new administrative measures for Chinese credit reference agencies, U.S. states’ challenges to NSA surveillance and new fining powers for the Dutch data protection authority.

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Global News Roundup

In this week’s Privacy Tracker Global News Roundup, read about court decisions, hearings and proposals that may affect the future of privacy legislation in the U.S.; the declaration by the UK Information Commissioner’s Office that one town violated privacy law with its use of traffic cameras; China’s latest privacy rule, and a United Arab Emirates law that forbids photographing or videoing another individual without their permission.

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Global News Roundup

Europe and Brazil are looking at possible changes to their data protection enforcement regimes. In the U.S., the Senate hearing discussing NSA surveillance practices indicated possible changes to the USA PATRIOT Act, California is considering a digital license plate bill, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled warrants are needed for cell phone data and one report suggests the landscape for privacy class-actions may be changing.

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Weekly Legislative Roundup

TechNewsDaily says that, as part of the fallout from the NSA leak, there has been a “surge in proposed privacy legislation concerning devices and their growing monitoring capabilities.” In addition to the Texas e-mail law and action in Maine to restrict drone use; federal lawmakers are working toward vehicle and TV consumer privacy bills, and others are working to restrict government collection of data. Whether due to the NSA revelations or not, anti-surveillance does seem to be the latest trend in privacy law.

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