Posted in: Financial Privacy

Global News Roundup

In the U.S., eight states have been in the news for movement on drone legislation. While most are fairly similar, bills in California and Utah put restrictions on use and retention of the data, and one of the two drone bills in front of the Georgia House focuses on a 100-foot “protected zone.” In Montana, a suicide review board has been given authorization to begin looking into the healthcare records of suicide victims in an attempt to lower the incidents in the state, causing some privacy concerns. And Maine has opted for a study instead of furthering a social media privacy bill. Read about these developments and more in this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup.

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IAPP Westin Research Center

Court Decision Brings Implications for Breach Liability

By Dennis Holmes, IAPP Westin Research Fellow

On September 3, the Fifth Circuit reversed and remanded a District Court ruling that dismissed a negligence claim based solely on economic losses in Lone Star National Bank v. Heartland Payment Systems, Inc. Though the Fifth Circuit stopped short of deciding any dispositive issues, the decision has important implications concerning the scope of liability for data breaches.

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California Tackling Privacy Reform

California has a heavy privacy legislative season on tap. Items on the agenda include a children’s privacy bill similar to COPPA; the Social Networking Privacy Act; the Right to Know Act—an update to the Shine the Light Act, and amendments to CalOPPA and the Song-Beverly Credit Card Act.

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State Legislative Roundup

Over the past two weeks, several states have enacted or initiated privacy legislation. California has moved forward on a security breach notification law, and Maine has considered a 911 privacy bill. Topping state legislative action, however, are social media privacy laws. From Utah to New Jersey, states are clamping down on the employer practice of requiring employees and applicants to disclose social media passwords. In this roundup, we take a look at these initiatives and some concerns that these social media laws could conflict with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.

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