Posted in: Information Security

What Privacy Professionals Should Know About the NIST Cybersecurity Framework

By Harriet Pearson, CIPP/US and The Hogan Lovells Privacy Team

In February of this year, President Obama issued an Executive Order on Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity. The Executive Order directed the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to develop a Cybersecurity Framework to assist owners and operators of critical infrastructure in addressing cybersecurity risks. On October 29, NIST published a preliminary version of the...

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One State, Two Cases, Dramatically Different Outcomes

By Lindsey Partridge, CIPP/US

Two public entities, the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and the Rock County Office of Child Support Enforcement—both with snooping employees and both facing class-actions by victims to recoup losses. So why was there a $2 million discrepancy in their outcomes?

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Making Sense of China’s New Privacy Laws

By The Hogan Lovells Privacy Team

In an apparent effort to encourage consumer engagement in the e-commerce market and establish baseline security standards, the Chinese government has in the past several months released laws, regulations and guidelines focused on privacy and security issues. In this post, we briefly summarize some of the notable takeaways from these initiatives.

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Researchers: Hold Off on Application Privacy, Protection and Security Act

Research reports on calls to hold off on the proposed Application Privacy, Protection and Security (APPS) Act. The Marketing Research Association (MRA) is concerned the act would empower the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) “to define what the term ‘personal data’ meant, as the MRA had already seen in a previous act’s amendment debate that the FTC thought this meant that almost any piece of information could be personally identifiable,” the report states.

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