Posted in: Internet of Things

Global News Roundup

While U.S. federal lawmakers struggle to find the right balance on data breach notification, state legislators are offering up bills to protect consumers from tracking through cellphones, smart meters and license plates, and one company is pushing back against Utah’s license-plate privacy law, saying it infringes on First Amendment rights. This Privacy Tracker weekly roundup covers all this and more, including the FTC, G29 and APEC announcement of a cross-border data transfer tool at the IAPP’s Global Privacy Summit last week and the Mexican DPA’s warning of an “abundance” of fines to come.

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Global News Roundup

Nigeria and Turkey are both considering government-proposed legislation that would require service providers to turn over to law enforcement customers’ data upon request—with fines, and possible jail time for executives, for noncompliance in Nigeria. In the U.S., senators are addressing breach response and online privacy concerns with bills of their own as the fallout continues from the Target and Neiman Marcus breaches as well as the Snowden revelations. And in Australia, the deadline for the Australian Privacy Principles looms large. The Privacy Tracker’s weekly legislative roundup covers all this and more.

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Weekly Legislative Roundup

TechNewsDaily says that, as part of the fallout from the NSA leak, there has been a “surge in proposed privacy legislation concerning devices and their growing monitoring capabilities.” In addition to the Texas e-mail law and action in Maine to restrict drone use; federal lawmakers are working toward vehicle and TV consumer privacy bills, and others are working to restrict government collection of data. Whether due to the NSA revelations or not, anti-surveillance does seem to be the latest trend in privacy law.

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FDA Issues Guidance on Medical Device Cybersecurity

By Luis Salazar

Here’s something a bit unnerving: Life-saving and life-enhancing medical devices—pacemakers, patient monitors, and imaging scanners, for example—are vulnerable to hackers and malicious intrusions. Those vulnerabilities can, of course, have catastrophic impacts on patients who rely on those devices, but even patient fear of these vulnerabilities can have adverse repercussions.

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