Posted in: Global Interoperability

Global News Roundup

The Dutch Parliament has approved the use of drones for video surveillance, giving mayors the right to determine when the use is appropriate; meanwhile, in the U.S., Washington state’s governor vetoed a drone bill there, saying it doesn’t go far enough to protect privacy. This week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup offers information on Idaho’s new DNA privacy law, Utah’s new mobile device privacy law and clarification on TCPA issued by the Federal Communications Commission. Also learn about the one-million Euro fine Google will pay to Italian regulators and a suit in Canada seeking class-action status that claims the Communications Security Establishment Canada “has been violating the constitutional rights of millions of Canadians.”

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IAPP Westin Research Center

The Australian Privacy Principles: What They Mean for the Rest of the World

By Dennis Holmes, IAPP Westin Research Fellow

While many organizations within Australia work to implement the newly enacted Australian Privacy Principles (APPs), organizations outside the country may wonder in what way the new law affects their business practices. In this Privacy Tracker post, IAPP Westin Fellow Dennis Holmes outlines aspects of the APPs that non-Australian businesses, particularly service providers, may want to pay attention to, including the privacy commissioner’s interpretation of “carrying on business” that “departs from the traditional notion of that standard in Australian law.” Holmes notes that the newness of the APPs makes it unclear how they will be applied, but “companies must understand whether they are subject to liability under the new rules and take meaningful steps toward full compliance if so.”

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Global News Roundup

While U.S. federal lawmakers struggle to find the right balance on data breach notification, state legislators are offering up bills to protect consumers from tracking through cellphones, smart meters and license plates, and one company is pushing back against Utah’s license-plate privacy law, saying it infringes on First Amendment rights. This Privacy Tracker weekly roundup covers all this and more, including the FTC, G29 and APEC announcement of a cross-border data transfer tool at the IAPP’s Global Privacy Summit last week and the Mexican DPA’s warning of an “abundance” of fines to come.

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Global News Roundup

This week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup includes the IAPP’s coverage of the European Commission’s report critiquing the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor agreement and offering the U.S. 13 ways to save it, and insight from Eduardo Ustaran, CIPP/E, on the report. You’ll also find information on the United Nation’s approval of an unlawful surveillance resolution, why India may have to wait a little longer for a privacy law and South Africa’s new law. In the U.S., more regions are considering social media laws and DNA databases, and courts have decided cases relating to COPPA and consumer privacy.

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Global News Roundup

This week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup highlights changing privacy laws from the U.S. to Bahrain. Revisions to the U.S. Telephone Consumer Protection Act went into effect last week; the European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs will vote today on amendments to the proposed regulation and directive—including one that would see U.S. companies seeking permission from EU officials before complying with government access requests to EU data, and the Bahrain cabinet has preliminarily approved a data protection law. Meanwhile, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office is considering jail time for breaches at the same time as justifying its fining practices.

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The LIBE Vote on EU Data Protection: What, Exactly, Happens on Monday?

By Emily Leach, CIPP/US

The European Parliament’s Committee on Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE) has scheduled votes on the reports on the revised data protection regulation and directive for Monday in Strasbourg. This post notes outlines the steps that come after Monday’s vote in order to create a new data protection law in the EU and offers insight into what EU privacy pros are saying about the likely outcome.

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Global News Roundup

Europe and Brazil are looking at possible changes to their data protection enforcement regimes. In the U.S., the Senate hearing discussing NSA surveillance practices indicated possible changes to the USA PATRIOT Act, California is considering a digital license plate bill, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled warrants are needed for cell phone data and one report suggests the landscape for privacy class-actions may be changing.

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