Posted in: Data Governance

Global News Roundup

The Supreme Court of Canada, in a unanimous ruling, has determined that the Alberta privacy law is unconstitutional and has given the province one year to amend it; A federal judge in Vermont has ruled there can be no expectation of privacy when it comes to data exposed online via a peer-to-peer file-sharing network, and the New Zealand Parliament has voted down a bill that would have given the privacy commissioner increased powers. Meanwhile, the FTC has asserted its power over parental-consent methods, Brazil is calling for a crackdown on government surveillance and Italy’s data protection authority and intelligence department have entered into a cooperation protocol. This week’s Privacy Tracker roundup has these stories and more.

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What Privacy Professionals Should Know About the NIST Cybersecurity Framework

By Harriet Pearson, CIPP/US and The Hogan Lovells Privacy Team

In February of this year, President Obama issued an Executive Order on Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity. The Executive Order directed the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to develop a Cybersecurity Framework to assist owners and operators of critical infrastructure in addressing cybersecurity risks. On October 29, NIST published a preliminary version of the...

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U.S. Cybersecurity Policy Developments: A Year-to-Date Roundup

By The Hogan Lovells Privacy Team

In February, President Obama signed an Executive Order that put into motion a number of initiatives aimed at improving the cybersecurity posture of the “critical infrastructure” of the United States. Among the Order’s most significant provisions is Section 7, which directs the Commerce Department via its National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to develop a voluntary Cybersecurity...

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National Assembly Passes South African Data Protection Law

Having first been tabled in August 2009, the Protection of Personal Information Bill (POPI) has taken just over four years to get to the point where it was passed by the South African National Assembly on 20 August. All that stands in the way of POPI becoming law is its translation into Afrikaans and the signature of South African President Jacob Zuma.

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Global News Roundup

New challenges to a Utah surveillance law; an interesting turn of events in a case deciding whether government authorities can extract historical location data directly from telecommunications carriers without a search warrant; legislative initiatives related to FISA and the USA PATRIOT Act; questions about the future of Safe Harbor, and information on developments in Italy, France and Australia.

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US-EU Safe Harbor Under Pressure

By The Hogan Lovells Privacy Team

Safe Harbor is in danger. Organizations that have certified under Safe Harbor should closely monitor the EU’s legislative process and the TTIP for indications about Safe Harbor’s future. And they should give careful thought to contingency plans for handling the personal data of EU data subjects.

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