Posted in: Mobile Privacy

Global News Roundup

Privacy laws are being considered in nations across the globe, and this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup has updates on many of them. Brazil’s Chamber of Deputies has passed the Internet bill of rights—without its controversial local data storage provision; India has exempted government intelligence agencies from its draft law; Australia’s Senate is looking at a mandatory breach notification bill, and in Ireland, a bill intending to give adopted children identity rights is raising questions over parental privacy rights. In the U.S., Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) has proposed an updated version of his location privacy bill, and states continue to discuss issues surrounding student privacy and breach notification, among others.

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A Closer Look at the San Francisco City Attorney’s Suit Against Social Media App Maker MeetMe

By Stephen Satterfield

Earlier this month, San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera filed a complaint in California state court against MeetMe, Inc., the maker of a social networking app that, as the complaint puts it, is designed “to introduce users to new people and enable them to interact with strangers online and in person.” The complaint takes issue with one of the ways MeetMe encourages users to interact—by...

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Global News Roundup

While industry leaders at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, called for new rules surrounding data protection, the U.S. Supreme Court announced it will hear two cases involving warrantless searches by law enforcement of suspects’ cellphones. And, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission announced settlements with 12 companies over false claims of alignment with Safe Harbor rules. In this Privacy Tracker roundup, learn about these as well as bills being considered by U.S. state legislatures, how Obama’s NSA plans may affect EU law and more.

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Global News Roundup

In this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup, see BakerHostetler’s year-in-review on international privacy laws and read about cases you may have missed while enjoying the holiday season. For example, a U.S. District Court has deemed a Florida drug-screening law unconstitutional; U.S. Magistrate Judge Laurel Beeler ruled in the Hulu privacy lawsuit that no proof of injury is needed for viewers to recover damages, and the U.S. Federal Trade Commission settled with Accretive Health over the company’s failure to protect consumer data. Also, read about the contradicting rulings over the NSA’s data collection practices.

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Global News Roundup

From the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA), regulators are asserting themselves in consumer privacy issues. This Privacy Tracker weekly legislative roundup offers information on the FTC’s settlement with a flashlight app developer, as well as its plans for the upcoming year, and the Dutch DPA’s findings in its investigation of Google’s privacy policy. Meanwhile, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office announced that pending new pan-Europe legislation will result in significant budget losses, causing it to restructure; some are calling U.S. state attorneys general the most important privacy regulators in the country, and BC Information and Privacy Commissioner Elizabeth Denham is recommending the government amend the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

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Global News Roundup

While much of the news was focused on the EU Data Protection Regulation this week, a few other things of note happened in the legal realm as well. For example, the EU Parliament adopted a resolution to suspend SWIFT based on allegations that the U.S. NSA had access to EU citizen’s bank data; the FTC reached a settlement with Aaron’s, Inc., over the company’s consumer spying regime, and in Ecuador there are concerns that a new penal code could violate citizens’ online privacy. These are just a few of the stories—in addition to information on the LIBE vote and the future of Safe Harbor and the EU regulation—in this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup.

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global News Roundup

While U.S. regulators mull over the need for rules surrounding drone use by law enforcement, Montana’s new gun owner healthcare privacy law went into effect and California continues to shape privacy law moving toward a “presumption of harm” in breach cases, but one op-ed claims its “revenge porn” law doesn’t do enough. A Zimbabwean law established a central SIM card database, and Australia’s information commissioner has released a best practice guide for app developers. This weekly roundup offers information on all these issues and more, including what regulators had to say at both the IAPP Privacy Academy and the 35th International Conference of Data Protection and Privacy Commissioners.

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Global News Roundup

The California state Senate passed a bill that would require require certain website operators and online service providers to disclose whether they honor users’ “do not track” requests; a bill proposed to the Michigan Assembly could mean fines and jail time for law enforcement officers who track suspects using GPS without a warrant; Wisconsin is poised to be the ninth state this year to pass an employee social media privacy law, and, in Brazil, work is ongoing towards the nation’s first set of data protection and Internet governance laws—including a new amendment requiring data to be stored locally, which is raising concerns among U.S. tech companies.

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Global News Roundup

The lasting legacy of California’s SB 1386, more about the court case that has some questioning BYOD policies and congressional delays to reforming the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. Plus, read about key changes included in amendments to the Ukrainian privacy law and a contentious New Jersey bill that would allow warrantless cellphone searches.

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Global News Roundup

New challenges to a Utah surveillance law; an interesting turn of events in a case deciding whether government authorities can extract historical location data directly from telecommunications carriers without a search warrant; legislative initiatives related to FISA and the USA PATRIOT Act; questions about the future of Safe Harbor, and information on developments in Italy, France and Australia.

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