February 2014

CNIL: a regulator to watch in 2014

By Olivier Proust

With an uptick in inspections, 43 formal compliance notices and a record fine against Google for noncompliance with the French Data Protection Act, the French data protection authority, the CNIL, is asserting itself in the international data protection scene. In this Privacy Tracker post, Olivier Proust of Field Fisher Waterhouse offers concrete examples of the CNIL’s growth, resourcefulness and experience, noting, “companies should pay close attention to the actions of the CNIL as it becomes a more powerful authority in France and within the European Union.”

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Global News Roundup

In this Privacy Tracker legislative roundup, read about privacy concerns related to Brazil’s proposed Internet privacy law and one Turkey’s president recently signed into law, and get some insight on complying with South Africa’s new law. In the U.S., states are moving along bills to prevent revenge porn in Illinois and protect readers’ privacy in New Jersey and student privacy in Wyoming and Kansas, among others. Also, the Massachusetts Supreme Court has determined that police need to get a warrant in order to collect cellphone location data over a period of time.

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Global News Roundup

In this Privacy Tracker weekly legislative roundup, read about the prospects of German advocacy groups getting the right to sue businesses, the status of the Philippines’ cybercrime law and proposals in the U.S. pushing for less data collection and more consumer protections. The Utah attorney general has stopped using administrative subpoenas for cellphone and Internet data, saying “writing yourself a note to go after that stuff without any check is too dangerous,” while the Senate looks at a bill that would mean law enforcement needs a judge’s order as well. Also, Orin Kerr has published an article supposing what a communication privacy act might look like if the U.S. scrapped ECPA and started from scratch, and there’s a handy interactive map outlining the status of social media privacy laws throughout the U.S.

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A Closer Look at the San Francisco City Attorney’s Suit Against Social Media App Maker MeetMe

By Stephen Satterfield

Earlier this month, San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera filed a complaint in California state court against MeetMe, Inc., the maker of a social networking app that, as the complaint puts it, is designed “to introduce users to new people and enable them to interact with strangers online and in person.” The complaint takes issue with one of the ways MeetMe encourages users to interact—by...

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Global News Roundup

Nigeria and Turkey are both considering government-proposed legislation that would require service providers to turn over to law enforcement customers’ data upon request—with fines, and possible jail time for executives, for noncompliance in Nigeria. In the U.S., senators are addressing breach response and online privacy concerns with bills of their own as the fallout continues from the Target and Neiman Marcus breaches as well as the Snowden revelations. And in Australia, the deadline for the Australian Privacy Principles looms large. The Privacy Tracker’s weekly legislative roundup covers all this and more.

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Global News Roundup

In the U.S., eight states have been in the news for movement on drone legislation. While most are fairly similar, bills in California and Utah put restrictions on use and retention of the data, and one of the two drone bills in front of the Georgia House focuses on a 100-foot “protected zone.” In Montana, a suicide review board has been given authorization to begin looking into the healthcare records of suicide victims in an attempt to lower the incidents in the state, causing some privacy concerns. And Maine has opted for a study instead of furthering a social media privacy bill. Read about these developments and more in this week’s Privacy Tracker legislative roundup.

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