Contributor: Ruby A. Zefo, CIPP/US, CIPM

Ruby Zefo, CIPP/US, CIPM, is Intel’s Chief Privacy & Security Counsel. Zefo manages Intel’s global privacy and security legal practice, where she is responsible for the development and implementation of legal strategies that advance Intel’s worldwide opportunities related to privacy, data security and cyber security, while appropriately managing associated legal risks. In addition, Zefo manages the teams responsible for all legal support of Intel’s IT department, and Intel’s global trademark practice. She joined Intel in 2003. She has a B.S. in Business Administration from the University of California at Berkeley, and a J.D. from Stanford Law School.

Opinion

How Privacy Got Lucky

By Ruby A. Zefo

On this fine St. Patrick’s Day, I ponder about getting lucky. No, not THAT kind of lucky. We’re all about the privacy! Some of you may think that privacy has been very unlucky indeed. But compared to what could have happened, I believe that privacy still carries a wee bit o’ the shamrock. Think about privacy as a glass at least half full. If you are inclined to be grumpy about the half-empty...

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Opinion

Privacy Is Not Dead ... It's Aliiiiive!

By Ruby A. Zefo

Like many of you, I have been told repeatedly that “privacy is dead.” Most recently, I was walking down the hall in my office building, carrying my Ultrabook with the Future of Privacy Forum’s “I (heart) privacy” sticker on it, and minding my own business. A marketing colleague stopped me and abruptly advised me that “the thing you love is dead.” 

Good heavens. For a minute I panicked. What...

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Employee Privacy

I Spy With My Corporate Eye: The Employee Services Conundrum

By Ruby A. Zefo

Note from the Editor:

Ruby will lead a breakout session at this year's IAPP Privacy Academy in Seattle, WA.

It’s a conundrum: Companies want employees to be satisfied with their corporate services, but great user experiences in this context can require a certain amount of employee tracking that could affect employees’ views about workplace privacy. Even M doesn’t really want to know whether James Bond prefers his martini shaken, not stirred, but it may be incidental to the CCTV cameras in the MI6 café...

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