Contributor: Stanley W. Crosley, CIPP/US, CIPM

Stan Crosley is director of the Indiana University Center for Law, Ethics and Applied Research (CLEAR) in Health Information, counsel to Drinker Biddle & Reath as well as a principal in Crosley Law Offices, LLC. He is the former chief privacy officer for Eli Lilly Company, where he initiated Lilly’s global privacy program in 1998. The program received the 2007 Innovation Award from the IAPP. Crosley also co-founded and served as chair of the International Pharmaceutical Privacy Consortium and was a member of the IOM Medical Research and Privacy Committee. He serves on the boards of the Indiana Health Informatics Technology, Inc., the IAPP and The Privacy Projects. Crosley is a member of the Brookings Institute’s Active Surveillance Implementation Council, which is providing guidance to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on issues surrounding medical product surveillance and the FDA’s Sentinel project. He is a member of the board of Shepherd Community Center, dedicated to breaking the cycle of poverty on Indianapolis’s east side, and is active in his church and community. You can find him on Twitter @crozlaw

Opinion

Old School Privacy is Dead, But Don’t Go Privacy Crazy

By Stanley W. Crosley
Image from "Redneck Crazy" video by Tyler Farr

When I have the occasion to drive the kids to school, our music selections range almost as widely as our breakfast choices—some Christian, some country and some 80s, to which I alone know the lyrics. Recently, a particularly funny, somewhat concerning country song, “Redneck Crazy” by Tyler Farr, caught my attention. The song includes the following line, “You done broke the wrong heart baby ......

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Opinion

What Does a Five-Year-Old Know that Our Privacy Laws Don't?

By Stanley W. Crosley

I have three children: twins Rachel and Abby, both age 16 and Jacob, age 14. While in my second year at Eli Lilly and Company nearly a decade ago, my wife, Melisa, had a medical procedure. Jake and I drove Melisa to the doctor’s office for the colonoscopy (although HIPAA does not apply, rules of matrimonial harmony do, so I have received a verbal consent for this disclosure). 

When Melisa had...

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