Posted in Facial Recognition

Biometrics

How You Can Help Shape the Contours of Facial Recognition Self-Regulation

On February 25, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) held the second meeting of the Facial Recognition Multi-Stakeholder Process. The IAPP’s Angelique Carson, CIPP/US, reported on the first meeting here. The ultimate goal is to develop a code of conduct consistent with the Consumer Privacy Bill of Rights that will be both voluntary and enforceable by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

A key outcome of the meeting is the determination that commercial entities will be covered—battles around government uses will take place elsewhere. So it is time for developers of commercial facial recognition technologies and the entities using them to “face it” and take action.

More from Leslie Dunlap

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Revenge Porn, Copyrights and Data Ownership: Where Does Our Data Begin and End?

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

There was an interesting article in The Atlantic Monthly this week about revenge porn and copyright law—and I’m hoping some of you out there can help me.

But first, let me step back.

More from Jedidiah Bracy

From the Regulator

Stage Is Set for a Challenging Year for Privacy in Canada

Shakespeare wrote in The Tempest that “What’s past is prologue,” and this notion definitely holds true when we consider the most significant privacy issues for Canadians in 2014. Issues such as government surveillance and massive data breaches that pushed privacy to centre stage last year—prompting Dictionary.com to make “privacy” its word of the year—will undoubtedly continue to be hot issues. But we can also expect to see a plethora of challenging new issues flowing from the intersection of technology and privacy. The Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada has been closely examining several new technological issues as part of our recent research efforts—precisely because we expect they will raise important privacy issues in Canada in the year ahead and beyond.

Here is a glance at some of the key issues on our watch list:

More from Chantal Bernier

From the Regulator

Living in Interesting Times—A View from the New Zealand Privacy Office

One of the dubious delights of being a privacy regulator is the unexpected things that crop up during every working week. It doesn’t matter how I plan and prioritise work—some headline-grabbing issue or urgent demand for time and attention will come across the desk and force a rethink. It can be a challenge, but it certainly keeps the job interesting.

More from Katrine Evans

Privacy Art

Sending a Message Through Privacy Art

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E
NYT Word Frequency, by Jer Thorpe

In one of Portlandia’s early episodes, “Bryce Shivers” and “Lisa Eversman” reveal how they spruce things up and make them pretty by putting birds on them. They even put a bird on a bird and get more than they bargained for when an actual bird makes an appearance—giving new meaning to deconstruction.

The clip reminded me of the protean definition of art. Is wrapping a building in cloth art? Put some cloth on it! Well, to some, yes. So without going into the classic, “what is art?” tangent, let’s just say that art means different things to different folks.

Which brings me to LinkedIn passwords.

More from Jedidiah Bracy

Opinion

A Brave New World Demands Brave New Thinking

By Phil Lee, CIPP/E, CIPM

Much has been said in the past few weeks and months about Google Glass, Google’s latest innovation that will see it shortly launch Internet-connected glasses with a small computer display in the corner of one lens that is visible to, and voice-controlled by, the wearer. The proposed launch capabilities of the device itself are—in pure computing terms—actually relatively modest: the ability to search the web, bring up maps, take photographs and video and share to social media.

So far, so iPhone.

But, because users wear and interact with Google Glass wherever they go, they will have a depth of relationship with their device that far exceeds any previous relationship between man and computer.

More from Phil Lee

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Did Andy Warhol Get It Wrong?

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

We have a framed New Yorker cartoon above our candy machine here in our IAPP office. Above the seriously tempting Skittles and M&Ms hangs an image of a businessman and a fortune teller with the caption, “In the future, everyone will have privacy for fifteen minutes.”

We could also say it this way, “In the future, everyone will have anonymity for fifteen minutes.” 

It’s beginning to look like the future is now.

More from Jedidiah Bracy

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Will Retailers Have To Dial It Back in 2013?

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

Offline tracking of consumers by retailers is popping up quite a bit in the news this week, which has me wondering what the end game might be.

First, we learned that Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) still isn’t happy with Euclid Analytics—a company that has reportedly recorded the shopping habits of nearly 50 million Americans.

More from Jedidiah Bracy