Posted in Behavioral Targeting

Opinion

Wearable Technology: The Prophecy of Marty McFly and Dick Tracy

By Todd B. Ruback, CIPP/US, CIPP/E, CIPP/IT

Little did I realize when I watched Back to the Future II all those years ago that it would be a prophetic movie. Do you remember the scene where Marty McFly puts on his self-lacing shoes?  He just slipped his feet into the shoes and they laced themselves up. Believe it or not, I hear that 2015 will be the year that “power laces” hit the market. Wearable technology, anticipated way back in 1980 by none other than Marty McFly, is here and its about to get even more interesting. You may also remember that “wearables” were touted long before Marty McFly by none other than the Dick Tracy! He had the very first smartwatch that doubled as a walkie-talkie. Tracy, like McFly, was way ahead of his time because smartwatches are now here, and they are very cool.

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Opinion

On Making Consumer Scoring More Fair and Transparent

To score is human. Ranking people by grades and other performance numbers is as old as time itself. Consumer scores—numbers given to people to describe their characteristics, habits or predilections—are a modern day numeric shorthand that ranks, separates, sifts and otherwise categorizes people and also predicts their potential future actions.

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Opinion

The Big Issues for the Retail Industry and Mobile Device Tracking

By Todd B. Ruback, CIPP/US, CIPP/E, CIPP/IT

Mobile device tracking is a big deal in the retail world, a very big deal. So big that it can transform the retail industry. Which is why last week I attended the FTC’s Mobile Device Tracking Seminar to learn more.

Here’s the big picture.

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Practical Privacy

COPPA, Behavioral Ads, Mobile Marketing and Other Big PPS Takeaways

By Annie C. Bai, CIPP/US

Jed’s not the only one who was having a good time at last week’s Practical Privacy Series in NYC. Across the way, many of us found that an entire day was barely enough to devote to Online Marketing. First, it was all about the kids, then it was all about the web, and finally we ended with a rousing roundtable on Big Data. Here are some of the tidbits from the day that caused me to take pause and grab my pen.

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Trending

The Big Data Fight and What We Can Learn from Adam, Eve and Aldous Huxley

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

In the privacy world, we often hear the argument that, in order for the information economy to thrive, personal privacy must be leveraged—that there must be tradeoffs. In a recent blog post on the supposed death of privacy, I quoted a Harvard professor from 1970 as saying that a world with complete privacy is a utopian concept.

Enter Carnegie Mellon University researcher Alessandro Acquisti. This week, the well-known TED Talk series released a presentation by Acquisti from earlier this summer on “Why Privacy Matters”—and he kicked it off with the story of Adam and Eve, the original residents of the original utopia, and “their notorious privacy incident”:

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Big Data

What’s in a Name? Data Broker or Marketing Data Broker

By Nicole Tachibana, CIPP/US

The marketing industry has come under fire recently for its use of consumer data to provide ads and offers. There are a number of misconceptions at the heart of the issue. To begin with, we should correct the misperception that all data brokers operate the same. I don’t presume to understand the inner workings of each type of data broker, but marketing data brokers collect and use information to offer more relevant ads in a variety of channels. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Commissioner Julie Brill said that data brokers (specifically naming only marketing data brokers- Acxiom, Experian, and Epsilon) are using “dossiers” to “determine the rates we pay [and] even what jobs we get.” However, the reality is that marketing data brokers use information for marketing purposes only.

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Trending

The Internet of Things: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

A few months back, the Federal Trade Commission called for public commentary on the nascent phenomenon otherwise known as the Internet of Things (IoT). The inevitable move toward a vast set of sensors, RFID chips, machine to machine communications (M2M), near field communication that are connected to the Internet—made possible, in part, by opening up IPv6—is fully underway and the FTC wants to know what, if anything, to do about it.

Last week, in anticipation of a roundtable discussion on IoT, the FTC released 27 comments, ranging from industry associations to government regulators to privacy advocacy groups to academics. Set with the knowledge that I’ll be attending said roundtable this November, I perused these comments to get a better understanding of the many benefits, concerns and possible outcomes of IoT.

Here’s some of what I found.

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Trending

Will Retailers Have To Dial It Back in 2013?

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

Offline tracking of consumers by retailers is popping up quite a bit in the news this week, which has me wondering what the end game might be.

First, we learned that Sen. Al Franken (D-MN) still isn’t happy with Euclid Analytics—a company that has reportedly recorded the shopping habits of nearly 50 million Americans.

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