Posted in Privacy Profession

Trending

Privacy Goes Mainstream at SXSW and TED2014

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E
TED’s Chris Anderson interviewing Edward Snowden via telepresence robot.

For those immersed in the privacy profession, the last few years have seen a dramatic change in the public’s awareness of privacy issues, rising from relative obscurity to downright mainstream. A personal litmus test for me, and many of my IAPP colleagues, revolves around how easy it is to explain what we do for a living:

“Yeah, so I work for a privacy association,” we might say over drinks at a party.

“Oh, so you’re in IT?”

“Well, not quite, but there is overlap…”

So the conversation often goes. Over the years we’ve tried to master our elevator speech. The rate of eyes growing glassy is inversely proportionate to explanation efficiency.

More from Jedidiah Bracy

Privacy Profession

Which Drives Leadership: Compliance or Strategy?

Leadership is crucial to a successful privacy program. It is leadership that engages senior executives, inspires an extended team and provides hope to advocates and confidence to regulators.

But what drives leadership in 2014? Is it the need to have a highly compliant organization in an era where compliance is very complex? Or is a strategic approach to information governance when data moves from being a business facilitator to the driver of innovation?

More from Martin Abrams

Opinion

The Privacy Pro’s Guide to the Internet of Things

By Eduardo Ustaran, CIPP/E

Recent stories about smart fridges being hacked, cars knowing our intimate secrets and energy companies predicting what we are having for dinner—OK, I made that one up—highlight the fascinating challenges that the Internet of Things (IoT) is set to bring. More fascinating, however, is the fact that addressing and successfully dealing with these challenges in a way that the opportunities are fully realised at the same time that our privacy is properly safeguarded rests with today’s and tomorrow’s privacy professionals.

The privacy issues raised by the IoT will test our skills in the same way that more traditional Internet uses have been challenging our professional ability to identify risks, assess their likely impact and deploy practical solutions for everyone’s benefit. Here are some tips on how we may be able to handle the IoT revolution.

More from Eduardo Ustaran

Opinion

Old School Privacy is Dead, But Don’t Go Privacy Crazy

By Stanley W. Crosley, CIPP/US, CIPM
Image from “Redneck Crazy” video by Tyler Farr

When I have the occasion to drive the kids to school, our music selections range almost as widely as our breakfast choices—some Christian, some country and some 80s, to which I alone know the lyrics. Recently, a particularly funny, somewhat concerning country song, “Redneck Crazy” by Tyler Farr, caught my attention. The song includes the following line, “You done broke the wrong heart baby ... drove me redneck crazy.”

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Practical Privacy

Privacy 101 for SMEs: The Best Defense is a Good Offense

By Omer Tene
and Marc Groman, CIPP/US

Imagine you are a major retailer and have to disclose a few days before Christmas that hackers stole credit card details and personal data on about –oh, 110 million shoppers –from your secure safe. Or that just as your app is experiencing hockey stick growth, leading tech blogs and media blast you for uploading users’ contact lists to your servers without permission.

Hearing news like this, you probably cringe at the thought that this might happen to you. But, of course, you are not a major retailer or global corporation, or even an app with tens of millions of users commanding media attention; you are a small or medium enterprise (SME), so you don’t have to worry, right? Wrong! Privacy and data security must be strategic considerations for every business, including garage entrepreneurs developing cool apps or analytics companies with half a dozen employees.

More from Omer Tene

Privacy Profession

Engineers and Lawyers in Privacy Protection: Can We All Just Get Along?

By Peter Swire, CIPP/US

In March 2013 we participated in a panel titled “Re-Engineering Privacy Law” at the IAPP Privacy Summit. The topic of the panel closely matches the topic of this book, how to bring together and leverage the skill sets of engineers, lawyers, and others to create effective privacy policy with correspondingly compliant implementations. As a software engineering professor (Antón) and a law professor (Swire), we consider four points: (1) how lawyers make simple things complicated; (2) how engineers make simple things complicated; (3) why it may be reasonable to use the term “reasonable” in privacy rules but not in software specifications; and (4) how to achieve consensus when both lawyers and engineers are in the room.

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Trending

The Supreme Court Is Scared of Technology. This Is How Privacy Pros Can Help

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

This was a big week for emerging technology—particularly the Internet of Things (IoT)—as was showcased during the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, NV. Cisco’s CEO made headlines after saying the IoT has the potential to become a $19 trillion market and much of mainstream media reported on all the emerging technology: smart cars, wearable sensors and digestible computers—stuff we’ve been reporting on pretty regularly in the past year.

So it seemed fitting—and concerning—that the Associated Press reported on the wariness felt by Supreme Court justices on judges weighing in on technology and privacy issues. As Justice Elena Kagan said last summer, “The justices are not necessarily the most technologically sophisticated people.”  And the court may face it’s biggest challenge yet, if, as many suspect, it eventually weighs in on the NSA’s metadata collection programs. Justice Antonin Scalia told a group of technology experts last July that elected branches of government are better equipped to grapple with security requirements and privacy protections.

More from Jedidiah Bracy

The Year in Review

2013: The Year of Privacy

Privacy Perspectives word cloud

If there ever was a “year of privacy,” surely it was 2013. A year that ends with dictionary.com selecting “privacy” as “word of the year;” with privacy making front-page headlines in The New York Times and The Washington Post (not to mention The Guardian) on a weekly, indeed almost daily, basis; with cross-Atlantic ties stretched to the limit over privacy issues, the UN passing a privacy resolution and armies of lobbyists spinning BCRs and Do-Not-Track in Washington bars and Brussels cafes—ladies and gentlemen, 2013 was the year of privacy.

More from Omer Tene