Posted in Internet of Things

Context

Making the Case for Surprise Minimization

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

Facebook made headlines this week—for a positive reason, this time—by announcing a new set of privacy controls to help users understand with whom they are communicating. Last month, at the IAPP Global Privacy Summit, Facebook CPO Erin Egan foreshadowed this roll out by exclaiming, “If people are surprised, that’s not good for me.”

What did she mean, exactly?

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Opinion

Wearable Technology: The Prophecy of Marty McFly and Dick Tracy

By Todd B. Ruback, CIPP/US, CIPP/E, CIPP/IT

Little did I realize when I watched Back to the Future II all those years ago that it would be a prophetic movie. Do you remember the scene where Marty McFly puts on his self-lacing shoes?  He just slipped his feet into the shoes and they laced themselves up. Believe it or not, I hear that 2015 will be the year that “power laces” hit the market. Wearable technology, anticipated way back in 1980 by none other than Marty McFly, is here and its about to get even more interesting. You may also remember that “wearables” were touted long before Marty McFly by none other than the Dick Tracy! He had the very first smartwatch that doubled as a walkie-talkie. Tracy, like McFly, was way ahead of his time because smartwatches are now here, and they are very cool.

More from Todd B. Ruback

Opinion

Addressing the Challenges of the Internet of Things: An EU Perspective

By Brian Davidson, CIPP/E

Recent news that smart fridge software was hacked to send out spam is the latest example of the ineluctable opportunities and challenges presented by the Internet of Things (IoT).

The intrusiveness of IoT technologies and their potential to collect unlimited amounts of data on users’ daily habits brings with it serious privacy concerns. As European regulators grapple with the challenges and complexities of formulating a technology-neutral Data Protection Regulation, the difficulties of applying “traditional” concepts such as consent, purpose limitation, transparency, data deletion, accountability and security to the data processing activities carried out by an “Internet-ready” kitchen appliance become readily apparent.

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Opinion

The Privacy Pro’s Guide to the Internet of Things

By Eduardo Ustaran, CIPP/E

Recent stories about smart fridges being hacked, cars knowing our intimate secrets and energy companies predicting what we are having for dinner—OK, I made that one up—highlight the fascinating challenges that the Internet of Things (IoT) is set to bring. More fascinating, however, is the fact that addressing and successfully dealing with these challenges in a way that the opportunities are fully realised at the same time that our privacy is properly safeguarded rests with today’s and tomorrow’s privacy professionals.

The privacy issues raised by the IoT will test our skills in the same way that more traditional Internet uses have been challenging our professional ability to identify risks, assess their likely impact and deploy practical solutions for everyone’s benefit. Here are some tips on how we may be able to handle the IoT revolution.

More from Eduardo Ustaran

Opinion

Putting Privacy Concerns about the Internet of Things in Perspective

I’ve written here and elsewhere about the growing privacy and security concerns surrounding the rise of the “Internet of Things” (IoT) era. Many privacy advocates are already decrying the potential for massive security threats and privacy violations in a world of always-on, always-sensing devices. I’ve admitted that there are some valid reasons for concern, even though I’ve also argued that most of us will likely quickly adapt to this new era and we will also find practical solutions to many of the problems that arise.

But it may be the case that some of the problems we fear today never come about.

More from Adam Thierer

Internet of Things

Connected Cars are Here. The Good News Is That Privacy Is Being Taken Seriously

The big news out of this year’s Consumer Electronics Show was the wide range of autos offering connected technologies, so-called “connected cars.” This latest introduction to the Internet of Things is already reshaping the auto industry. AAA recently estimated that one in five new cars sold this year will collect and transmit data outside the vehicle. According to one survey, cars may make up over five percent of connected devices by 2025.

The benefit of these technologies is hard to overstate.

More from Joshua Harris

Opinion

Old School Privacy is Dead, But Don’t Go Privacy Crazy

By Stanley W. Crosley, CIPP/US, CIPM
Image from “Redneck Crazy” video by Tyler Farr

When I have the occasion to drive the kids to school, our music selections range almost as widely as our breakfast choices—some Christian, some country and some 80s, to which I alone know the lyrics. Recently, a particularly funny, somewhat concerning country song, “Redneck Crazy” by Tyler Farr, caught my attention. The song includes the following line, “You done broke the wrong heart baby ... drove me redneck crazy.”

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Trending

The Supreme Court Is Scared of Technology. This Is How Privacy Pros Can Help

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

This was a big week for emerging technology—particularly the Internet of Things (IoT)—as was showcased during the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, NV. Cisco’s CEO made headlines after saying the IoT has the potential to become a $19 trillion market and much of mainstream media reported on all the emerging technology: smart cars, wearable sensors and digestible computers—stuff we’ve been reporting on pretty regularly in the past year.

So it seemed fitting—and concerning—that the Associated Press reported on the wariness felt by Supreme Court justices on judges weighing in on technology and privacy issues. As Justice Elena Kagan said last summer, “The justices are not necessarily the most technologically sophisticated people.”  And the court may face it’s biggest challenge yet, if, as many suspect, it eventually weighs in on the NSA’s metadata collection programs. Justice Antonin Scalia told a group of technology experts last July that elected branches of government are better equipped to grapple with security requirements and privacy protections.

More from Jedidiah Bracy