Posted in Right To Be Forgotten

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Revenge Porn, Copyrights and Data Ownership: Where Does Our Data Begin and End?

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

There was an interesting article in The Atlantic Monthly this week about revenge porn and copyright law—and I’m hoping some of you out there can help me.

But first, let me step back.

More from Jedidiah Bracy

Opinion

A Brave New World Demands Brave New Thinking

By Phil Lee, CIPP/E, CIPM

Much has been said in the past few weeks and months about Google Glass, Google’s latest innovation that will see it shortly launch Internet-connected glasses with a small computer display in the corner of one lens that is visible to, and voice-controlled by, the wearer. The proposed launch capabilities of the device itself are—in pure computing terms—actually relatively modest: the ability to search the web, bring up maps, take photographs and video and share to social media.

So far, so iPhone.

But, because users wear and interact with Google Glass wherever they go, they will have a depth of relationship with their device that far exceeds any previous relationship between man and computer.

More from Phil Lee

Opinion

What I’m Hearing Out on the Rue

A variety of client and professional meetings in France and Belgium have me here for an extended stay. I have heard many interesting things about privacy/data protection issues. So here is what I am hearing “out on the Rue.”

More from Christopher Wolf

Opinion

Will the Right To Be Forgotten Lead to a Society That Was Forgotten?

The “right to be forgotten,” a fundamental part of the proposed reforms to the EU’s data protection legislation, is being watched closely by professionals in the archives world. From a bird’s eye view, this proposal would have an undeniable effect on the preservation of the individual and collective memory of society.

Although the rationale and intent of the proposal is based on increasing concerns over the impact of rapidly advancing and intrusive technologies on the lives of people, the implications for the appraisal, selection and preservation of records containing personal data over time are very real and will need to be carefully considered. This proposal must be reviewed with the understanding that archival records—records of enduring administrative, legal, fiscal, cultural, historical and intrinsic value—represent the essence of a society and provide glimpses into the past and lessons for future generations.

More from Cherri-Ann Beckles

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When Someone Goes All Crazy on You and Spams Your Online Profile With Nastiness

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

Last week I discussed the concept of the “digital tattoo” and how our online footprint can have lasting effects—for better or worse. Well, teens and others who were liberal with their use of Snapchat may be scrambling today as news comes out that the app’s 10 seconds-or-less deletion feature may be saving photos directly on the user’s phone. Uh-oh. Here’s what KSL.com in Utah is reporting:

Orem-based firm Decipher Forensics said it has derived a method to extract the supposedly no-longer-viewable images and pass them on to parents, lawyers and law enforcement.

“The actual app is even saving the picture,” said Richard Hickman, a digital forensics examiner. “They claim that it’s deleted, and it’s not even deleted. It’s actually saved on the phone.”

More from Jedidiah Bracy

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Did Andy Warhol Get It Wrong?

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

We have a framed New Yorker cartoon above our candy machine here in our IAPP office. Above the seriously tempting Skittles and M&Ms hangs an image of a businessman and a fortune teller with the caption, “In the future, everyone will have privacy for fifteen minutes.”

We could also say it this way, “In the future, everyone will have anonymity for fifteen minutes.” 

It’s beginning to look like the future is now.

More from Jedidiah Bracy

opinion

Maybe We Need “A Right To Be Forgiven”

By J. Trevor Hughes, CIPP

Among the most controversial provisions within the proposed EU data protection regulation is “the right to be forgotten.”  The proposal, which would allow individuals to remove data companies have collected about them online unless the company can demonstrate a legitimate need, has elicited concerns from industry about its potential effects on both innovation and free speech. Others have said the provision would simply be unenforceable.

Internet co-founder Vint Cerf has called the provision impractical, saying it’s “very, very hard to get the Internet to forget things that you don’t want it to remember” and suggests, when it comes to protecting ones’ reputation in perpetuity online, that parents engage their children in “the art of critical thinking” instead.

More from J. Trevor Hughes