Posted in Big Data

Context

Making the Case for Surprise Minimization

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

Facebook made headlines this week—for a positive reason, this time—by announcing a new set of privacy controls to help users understand with whom they are communicating. Last month, at the IAPP Global Privacy Summit, Facebook CPO Erin Egan foreshadowed this roll out by exclaiming, “If people are surprised, that’s not good for me.”

What did she mean, exactly?

More from Jedidiah Bracy

Opinion

The White House Survey on Big Data and Privacy Is a Good Idea but Poorly Executed

As part of President Obama’s review of Big Data and privacy, the White House has declared, “We want to hear your opinion” and posted a simple online poll to get it. The Marketing Research Association (MRA) is pleased that the White House grasps some of the value of survey, opinion and marketing research based on their launch of this online survey effort. However, questionnaire design is crucial to the quality of the insights you can garner from any research, and these questions are lacking.

More from Howard Fienberg

Opinion

On Making Consumer Scoring More Fair and Transparent

To score is human. Ranking people by grades and other performance numbers is as old as time itself. Consumer scores—numbers given to people to describe their characteristics, habits or predilections—are a modern day numeric shorthand that ranks, separates, sifts and otherwise categorizes people and also predicts their potential future actions.

More from Pam Dixon

The Social Stuff

Putting Google Glass on Ann Landers

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

5-4. No, that’s not the vote count in a partisan Supreme Court decision or the score of a Major League Baseball Spring Training game.

It’s the number of “Dos” versus “Don’ts” on Google’s recently published blog post on the public implementation of the always-controversial Google Glass.

If you’re a Glass user, you might want to read it so you don’t get attacked…

More from Jedidiah Bracy

Big Data

Can We Balance Data Protection With Value Creation?

“Data People” by Andrés Opcional

In the last few years there has been a dramatic change in the opportunities organizations have to generate value from the data they collect about customers or service users. Customers and users are rapidly becoming collections of “data points” and organizations can learn an awful lot from the analysis of this huge accumulation of data points, also known as “Big Data.”

Organizations are perhaps thrilled, dreaming about new potential applications of digital data but also a bit concerned about hidden risks and unintended consequences. Take, for example, the human rights protections placed on personal data by the EU.  Regulators are watching closely, intending to preserve the eight basic privacy principles without compromising the free flow of information.

Some may ask whether it’s even possible to balance the two.

More from Sara Degli Esposti

Opinion

Privacy Is Not Dead ... It’s Aliiiiive!

By Ruby A. Zefo, CIPP/US, CIPM

Like many of you, I have been told repeatedly that “privacy is dead.” Most recently, I was walking down the hall in my office building, carrying my Ultrabook with the Future of Privacy Forum’s “I © privacy” sticker on it, and minding my own business. A marketing colleague stopped me and abruptly advised me that “the thing you love is dead.”

Good heavens. For a minute I panicked. What thing? Cuban sandwiches? My cat? Cowboy boots? What? He pointed to my sticker and said, “Privacy is dead!”

Oh, that. No sir, it is not dead.

More from Ruby A. Zefo

Opinion

Putting Privacy Concerns about the Internet of Things in Perspective

I’ve written here and elsewhere about the growing privacy and security concerns surrounding the rise of the “Internet of Things” (IoT) era. Many privacy advocates are already decrying the potential for massive security threats and privacy violations in a world of always-on, always-sensing devices. I’ve admitted that there are some valid reasons for concern, even though I’ve also argued that most of us will likely quickly adapt to this new era and we will also find practical solutions to many of the problems that arise.

But it may be the case that some of the problems we fear today never come about.

More from Adam Thierer

Big Data

How To Solve the President’s Big Data Challenge

In his recent remarks on the NSA and surveillance, President Barack Obama grabbed the Big Data bull by the horns. We commend the president’s decision to task the Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) to reach out to privacy experts, technologists and business leaders to examine the challenges inherent in Big Data. Government surveillance raises distinct civil liberties concerns that commercial and scientific use of Big Data does not; still, it is appropriate to address the profound impact of new technologies on Big Data business opportunities.

Big Data was all the rage in privacy circles in 2013, and now it is achieving appropriate broad policy attention. It implicates modern day dilemmas, which transcend privacy and impact a variety of delicate balancing acts at the core of free market democracy. The examination requires engagement not only by privacy professionals but also by ethicists, scientists and philosophers to address what may very well be the biggest public policy challenge of our time.

More from Jules Polonetsky