Privacy Dispatches

How Do You Engineer Privacy? NIST Seeks Answers

Last week, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) hosted a workshop to discuss and develop the concept of privacy engineering. Although a great deal was covered, three topics recurred throughout the workshop and appeared to be of special interest to NIST, most notably the lack of technical standards concerning privacy,the role engineers can play in protecting privacy and the role NIST should play in the privacy field going forward.

Opinion

Hey “Chicken Littles,” Wyndham Doesn’t Mean the Sky is Falling

By Jeff Kosseff, CIPP/US

Based on the extensive news coverage of this week’s court ruling against Wyndham Hotels and Resorts in its battle with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), one would think that the sky is falling on efforts to resist FTC enforcement actions relating to data security.

More from Jeff Kosseff

Opinion

IAPP Westin Research Center

In Standoff with FTC, Wyndham Shoots Itself in the Foot

The Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) resounding victory over Wyndham Worldwide Corporation in a U.S. District Court paves the way for increasing privacy and data security action by the agency, which over the past decade has asserted itself as the most forceful and well-respected privacy enforcement authority in the world.

More from Omer Tene

Cybersecurity

Why Privacy Pros Should Embrace NIST’s Final Cybersecurity Framework

By Richard Santalesa, CIPP/US

By now the saga is familiar. After the White House tasked the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) last February with developing a “Cybersecurity Framework” to reduce cybersecurity risks connected with “critical infrastructure,” a year to the day later, NIST released its final Version 1.0 of a “Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity” along with a companion “Roadmap” and supporting documents.

The many NIST workshops and weekly conference calls over the last year—Full disclosure: I took part in many of NIST’s working group calls—initially resulted in a draft and then 44-page preliminary framework, released last October and covered by the IAPP here. The preliminary framework spurred significant discussion and controversy during the 45-day public comment period following its release, primarily in connection with the “Privacy Methodology” depicted in Appendix B.

More from Richard Santalesa

Opinion

The Privacy Pro’s Guide to the Internet of Things

By Eduardo Ustaran, CIPP/E

Recent stories about smart fridges being hacked, cars knowing our intimate secrets and energy companies predicting what we are having for dinner—OK, I made that one up—highlight the fascinating challenges that the Internet of Things (IoT) is set to bring. More fascinating, however, is the fact that addressing and successfully dealing with these challenges in a way that the opportunities are fully realised at the same time that our privacy is properly safeguarded rests with today’s and tomorrow’s privacy professionals.

The privacy issues raised by the IoT will test our skills in the same way that more traditional Internet uses have been challenging our professional ability to identify risks, assess their likely impact and deploy practical solutions for everyone’s benefit. Here are some tips on how we may be able to handle the IoT revolution.

More from Eduardo Ustaran