Trending

Privacy Goes Mainstream at SXSW and TED2014

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E
TED’s Chris Anderson interviewing Edward Snowden via telepresence robot.

For those immersed in the privacy profession, the last few years have seen a dramatic change in the public’s awareness of privacy issues, rising from relative obscurity to downright mainstream. A personal litmus test for me, and many of my IAPP colleagues, revolves around how easy it is to explain what we do for a living:

“Yeah, so I work for a privacy association,” we might say over drinks at a party.

“Oh, so you’re in IT?”

“Well, not quite, but there is overlap…”

So the conversation often goes. Over the years we’ve tried to master our elevator speech. The rate of eyes growing glassy is inversely proportionate to explanation efficiency.

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Opinion

How Privacy Got Lucky

By Ruby A. Zefo, CIPP/US, CIPM

On this fine St. Patrick’s Day, I ponder about getting lucky. No, not THAT kind of lucky. We’re all about the privacy! Some of you may think that privacy has been very unlucky indeed. But compared to what could have happened, I believe that privacy still carries a wee bit o’ the shamrock. Think about privacy as a glass at least half full. If you are inclined to be grumpy about the half-empty part, imagine that privacy is an appletini and the other half is coursing through your veins, giving you the inspiration you need to continue the good fight. If you have enough glasses of privacy, you may do something wild and wonderful to draw attention to it—look at how much press privacy is getting these days!

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Privacy Profession

For Privacy Pros: A Look At Your Job Tomorrow

By Eduardo Ustaran, CIPP/E

It is pretty obvious that the privacy profession is changing fast.

Once the realm of an elite of nerdy specialists, the profession is opening up to include a whole range of professionals with a variety of talents, training and skill sets. And whilst the complexity of the challenges faced by those with responsibility for managing information, protecting data and safeguarding individual privacy remains as high as in the early days, the implications of addressing those challenges correctly are becoming exponentially greater. If we succeed, we will not only have contributed to the prosperity of future generations, but we will have also done our bit to preserve everyone’s freedom.

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Practical Privacy

What Makes a Good Privacy Officer?

By K Royal, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

Recently, as I was speaking to a talented group of law students, I was asked the above question. This has also been a related theme underlying some of the recent posts on the IAPP Privacy List. I’m not sure if this list is what those who want to enter the privacy field should cultivate in themselves, what current privacy officers are like or what we should be aiming for as a profession.

To build this list, I searched online for the top 10 traits or characteristics of compliance officers, salespeople, CEOs and managers. In essence, I could stop this blog entry now—that is what we are and should be: compliance officers, salespeople, CEOs, managers and let’s include janitors as well. In fact, let’s look at it that way: What job skills does one need to be an effective privacy officer? If we were to brew the perfect privacy officer, what career fields would we throw into the kettle?

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Privacy Community

A Year of Privacy Discussions: Looking Back and Forging Forward

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

Hard for me to believe, but it’s now been a year since we rolled out Perspectives, our very first blog here at the IAPP. As an organization, we were veering into uncharted territory, but our ultimate purpose was and continues to be to provide a forum for the difficult or practical or funny or just plain outlandish privacy conversations to play out.

Just before Christmas, we posted our top ten blog posts of 2013—all based on page views. But now that a full calendar year has gone by, I thought it worth looking back with a bit more nuance.

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