Internet of Things

Connected Cars are Here. The Good News Is That Privacy Is Being Taken Seriously

Note from the Editor:

Joshua Harris will moderate the breakout session “From 0-60: Privacy and the New Generation of Connected Cars,” which will include insight from FordDirect General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer Beth Hill, CIPP/US, and Scheja und Partner, Bonn (Germany) External Data Protection Officer Boris Reibach, at the IAPP Global Privacy Summit in Washington, DC, this March.

The big news out of this year’s Consumer Electronics Show was the wide range of autos offering connected technologies, so-called “connected cars.” This latest introduction to the Internet of Things is already reshaping the auto industry. AAA recently estimated that one in five new cars sold this year will collect and transmit data outside the vehicle. According to one survey, cars may make up over five percent of connected devices by 2025.

The benefit of these technologies is hard to overstate.

More from Joshua Harris

Opinion

Old School Privacy is Dead, But Don’t Go Privacy Crazy

By Stanley W. Crosley, CIPP/US, CIPM
Image from “Redneck Crazy” video by Tyler Farr

When I have the occasion to drive the kids to school, our music selections range almost as widely as our breakfast choices—some Christian, some country and some 80s, to which I alone know the lyrics. Recently, a particularly funny, somewhat concerning country song, “Redneck Crazy” by Tyler Farr, caught my attention. The song includes the following line, “You done broke the wrong heart baby ... drove me redneck crazy.”

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Trending

The Supreme Court Is Scared of Technology. This Is How Privacy Pros Can Help

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

This was a big week for emerging technology—particularly the Internet of Things (IoT)—as was showcased during the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, NV. Cisco’s CEO made headlines after saying the IoT has the potential to become a $19 trillion market and much of mainstream media reported on all the emerging technology: smart cars, wearable sensors and digestible computers—stuff we’ve been reporting on pretty regularly in the past year.

So it seemed fitting—and concerning—that the Associated Press reported on the wariness felt by Supreme Court justices on judges weighing in on technology and privacy issues. As Justice Elena Kagan said last summer, “The justices are not necessarily the most technologically sophisticated people.”  And the court may face it’s biggest challenge yet, if, as many suspect, it eventually weighs in on the NSA’s metadata collection programs. Justice Antonin Scalia told a group of technology experts last July that elected branches of government are better equipped to grapple with security requirements and privacy protections.

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The Year in Review

2013: The Year of Privacy

Privacy Perspectives word cloud

If there ever was a “year of privacy,” surely it was 2013. A year that ends with dictionary.com selecting “privacy” as “word of the year;” with privacy making front-page headlines in The New York Times and The Washington Post (not to mention The Guardian) on a weekly, indeed almost daily, basis; with cross-Atlantic ties stretched to the limit over privacy issues, the UN passing a privacy resolution and armies of lobbyists spinning BCRs and Do-Not-Track in Washington bars and Brussels cafes—ladies and gentlemen, 2013 was the year of privacy.

More from Omer Tene

Opinion

Eroding Trust: How New Smart TV Lacks Privacy by Design and Transparency

A year ago I got a new Samsung DVD player for Christmas. It’s a lovely device that I use most every day—mostly for streaming video from Netflix and Amazon. I apparently can also make Skype calls from it, though I haven’t tried — I’m told there are hundreds of other applications out there, so I’m probably underutilizing the device. But I’ve recently wondered—does Samsung log what I do on the player? Does it send information about my viewing back to Samsung. I . . . I guess I have no idea.

More from Justin Brookman