Opinion

The White House Survey on Big Data and Privacy Is a Good Idea but Poorly Executed

As part of President Obama’s review of Big Data and privacy, the White House has declared, “We want to hear your opinion” and posted a simple online poll to get it. The Marketing Research Association (MRA) is pleased that the White House grasps some of the value of survey, opinion and marketing research based on their launch of this online survey effort. However, questionnaire design is crucial to the quality of the insights you can garner from any research, and these questions are lacking.

More from Howard Fienberg

Opinion

On Making Consumer Scoring More Fair and Transparent

To score is human. Ranking people by grades and other performance numbers is as old as time itself. Consumer scores—numbers given to people to describe their characteristics, habits or predilections—are a modern day numeric shorthand that ranks, separates, sifts and otherwise categorizes people and also predicts their potential future actions.

More from Pam Dixon

Opinion

The Big Issues for the Retail Industry and Mobile Device Tracking

By Todd B. Ruback, CIPP/US, CIPP/E, CIPP/IT

Mobile device tracking is a big deal in the retail world, a very big deal. So big that it can transform the retail industry. Which is why last week I attended the FTC’s Mobile Device Tracking Seminar to learn more.

Here’s the big picture.

More from Todd B. Ruback

Opinion

Putting Privacy Concerns about the Internet of Things in Perspective

I’ve written here and elsewhere about the growing privacy and security concerns surrounding the rise of the “Internet of Things” (IoT) era. Many privacy advocates are already decrying the potential for massive security threats and privacy violations in a world of always-on, always-sensing devices. I’ve admitted that there are some valid reasons for concern, even though I’ve also argued that most of us will likely quickly adapt to this new era and we will also find practical solutions to many of the problems that arise.

But it may be the case that some of the problems we fear today never come about.

More from Adam Thierer

Privacy Engineering

Which Information Do Consumers Most Closely Guard?

Note from the Editor:

This is the fifth in a series of posts by Westerman and Aschenberger exploring the role of trust in the marketplace. Here are the first, second, third and fourth installments. The next post will look at just how closely consumers guard their personal digital data.

We know that consumers don’t always understand how companies collect their data, and that these misconceptions can create a trust gap between retailers and shoppers.

This doesn’t mean that consumers are completely unwilling to share their data with retailers, though. Our team at Create with Context surveyed 800 consumers in the U.S., asking them which information they’d be willing to give up in exchange for 50 percent off of three different items: a gallon of milk, a large-screen television and a new car.