Opinion

The Risk of the “Risk-Based Approach”

By Stuart S. Shapiro, CIPP/US, CIPP/G

At this year’s IAPP Global Privacy Summit, I repeatedly encountered references to and quasi-explanations of the “risk-based approach” to privacy. The risk-based approach is, apparently, the new black now that accountability is no longer quite so chic. With its focus on the privacy risks incurred by individuals, the risk-based approach is, I was informed, a bold new direction for the privacy profession.

Taken at face value, it’s rather difficult to imagine a more damning indictment of the privacy profession. It’s 2014 and we’ve only just started worrying about risks to individuals?

More from Stuart S. Shapiro

Cybersecurity

Is SEC Cybersecurity Guidance Working?

Imagine that the FBI and DHS have arrived at your company to inform you of a potential cyber threat. Your public company disclosure obligations may not be the first thing on your mind, but such issues will quickly emerge.

Opinion

Wearable Technology: The Prophecy of Marty McFly and Dick Tracy

By Todd B. Ruback, CIPP/US, CIPP/E, CIPP/IT

Little did I realize when I watched Back to the Future II all those years ago that it would be a prophetic movie. Do you remember the scene where Marty McFly puts on his self-lacing shoes?  He just slipped his feet into the shoes and they laced themselves up. Believe it or not, I hear that 2015 will be the year that “power laces” hit the market. Wearable technology, anticipated way back in 1980 by none other than Marty McFly, is here and its about to get even more interesting. You may also remember that “wearables” were touted long before Marty McFly by none other than the Dick Tracy! He had the very first smartwatch that doubled as a walkie-talkie. Tracy, like McFly, was way ahead of his time because smartwatches are now here, and they are very cool.

More from Todd B. Ruback

Opinion

The White House Survey on Big Data and Privacy Is a Good Idea but Poorly Executed

As part of President Obama’s review of Big Data and privacy, the White House has declared, “We want to hear your opinion” and posted a simple online poll to get it. The Marketing Research Association (MRA) is pleased that the White House grasps some of the value of survey, opinion and marketing research based on their launch of this online survey effort. However, questionnaire design is crucial to the quality of the insights you can garner from any research, and these questions are lacking.

More from Howard Fienberg

Opinion

Forget a National Data-Security Standard; I’d Be Happy with a One-Word Correction

I recently had the opportunity to watch recorded versions of the congressional hearings on cybercrime and the post-Thanksgiving data breaches. I came away confused and longing for a simpler time.

Not for a time, as you may think, when we didn’t have international computer hackers. I’m longing for a time when language didn’t fail us, when words would capture a concept and the definition would be so right that it addressed whatever future circumstances brought.

More from Jane Carpenter

Trending

Privacy Goes Mainstream at SXSW and TED2014

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E
TED’s Chris Anderson interviewing Edward Snowden via telepresence robot.

For those immersed in the privacy profession, the last few years have seen a dramatic change in the public’s awareness of privacy issues, rising from relative obscurity to downright mainstream. A personal litmus test for me, and many of my IAPP colleagues, revolves around how easy it is to explain what we do for a living:

“Yeah, so I work for a privacy association,” we might say over drinks at a party.

“Oh, so you’re in IT?”

“Well, not quite, but there is overlap…”

So the conversation often goes. Over the years we’ve tried to master our elevator speech. The rate of eyes growing glassy is inversely proportionate to explanation efficiency.

More from Jedidiah Bracy

Opinion

Addressing the Challenges of the Internet of Things: An EU Perspective

By Brian Davidson, CIPP/E

Recent news that smart fridge software was hacked to send out spam is the latest example of the ineluctable opportunities and challenges presented by the Internet of Things (IoT).

The intrusiveness of IoT technologies and their potential to collect unlimited amounts of data on users’ daily habits brings with it serious privacy concerns. As European regulators grapple with the challenges and complexities of formulating a technology-neutral Data Protection Regulation, the difficulties of applying “traditional” concepts such as consent, purpose limitation, transparency, data deletion, accountability and security to the data processing activities carried out by an “Internet-ready” kitchen appliance become readily apparent.

More from Brian Davidson