Opinion

IAPP Westin Research Center

InBloom Wilts Amid Privacy Backlash

Last week, Intel’s director of security policy and global privacy officer, David Hoffman, CIPP/US, wrote a Harvard Business Review piece announcing that “Privacy is a Business Opportunity.” InBloom’s demise yesterday in the face of a flurry of privacy allegations unambiguously demonstrates that privacy can also be a first-order business risk. So much so that it can bring a high-flying, much-celebrated, well-funded and strongly backed organization to its knees.

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Opinion

Revenge Porn, Public Shaming and Why It Needs To Stop

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

“Revenge porn” invades the privacy and dignity of women—and sometimes men—but the nefarious phenomenon gives rise to thorny legal issues that often leave victims unprotected—something about which I’ve recently written. If a victim’s photograph was a “selfie,” then said victim has a takedown right of action. But Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act (CDA) protects service providers. This latter provision helps, for the most part, keep the Internet free and open.

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Opinion

More Privacy Paternalism: “We Know What’s Best for You”

Scott Charney failed to mention that many of his arguments, which would result in weakening privacy protections, have already been addressed and do not enjoy widespread support. While he indicates that his suggestions will “enhance” data protection for consumers, the opposite will most likely occur. They reflect a paternalistic approach to data protection that, if implemented, will weaken rather than strengthen privacy in the 21st century. The notion that privacy can only pose a negative challenge to new technological trends reflects a dated, zero-sum perspective that has been proven wrong on countless occasions.

More from Ann Cavoukian

Privacy Dispatches

How Do You Engineer Privacy? NIST Seeks Answers

Last week, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) hosted a workshop to discuss and develop the concept of privacy engineering. Although a great deal was covered, three topics recurred throughout the workshop and appeared to be of special interest to NIST, most notably the lack of technical standards concerning privacy,the role engineers can play in protecting privacy and the role NIST should play in the privacy field going forward.

Context

Making the Case for Surprise Minimization

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E

Facebook made headlines this week—for a positive reason, this time—by announcing a new set of privacy controls to help users understand with whom they are communicating. Last month, at the IAPP Global Privacy Summit, Facebook CPO Erin Egan foreshadowed this roll out by exclaiming, “If people are surprised, that’s not good for me.”

What did she mean, exactly?

More from Jedidiah Bracy

Opinion

Hey “Chicken Littles,” Wyndham Doesn’t Mean the Sky is Falling

By Jeff Kosseff, CIPP/US

Based on the extensive news coverage of this week’s court ruling against Wyndham Hotels and Resorts in its battle with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), one would think that the sky is falling on efforts to resist FTC enforcement actions relating to data security.

More from Jeff Kosseff

Opinion

European Court Gives a Boost to EU Data Protection Reform

On April 8, the Court of Justice of the European Union invalidated the EU Data Retention Directive 2006/24. Beyond its significance for data retention, this judgment has important implications for EU data protection law in general and the proposed General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) in particular.

More from Christopher Kuner

Opinion

IAPP Westin Research Center

In Standoff with FTC, Wyndham Shoots Itself in the Foot

The Federal Trade Commission’s (FTC) resounding victory over Wyndham Worldwide Corporation in a U.S. District Court paves the way for increasing privacy and data security action by the agency, which over the past decade has asserted itself as the most forceful and well-respected privacy enforcement authority in the world.

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