Posted in December 2013

Privacy Art

Sending a Message Through Privacy Art

By Jedidiah Bracy, CIPP/US, CIPP/E
NYT Word Frequency, by Jer Thorpe

In one of Portlandia’s early episodes, “Bryce Shivers” and “Lisa Eversman” reveal how they spruce things up and make them pretty by putting birds on them. They even put a bird on a bird and get more than they bargained for when an actual bird makes an appearance—giving new meaning to deconstruction.

The clip reminded me of the protean definition of art. Is wrapping a building in cloth art? Put some cloth on it! Well, to some, yes. So without going into the classic, “what is art?” tangent, let’s just say that art means different things to different folks.

Which brings me to LinkedIn passwords.

More from Jedidiah Bracy

Opinion

Think the FTC Is the De Facto U.S. Data Protection Authority? State AGs May Have Something To Say

By Divonne Smoyer, CIPP/US
and Aaron Lancaster, CIPP/US

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has understandably been the focus of much attention in the data privacy world. The FTC is considered by many to be the primary U.S. data privacy regulator and this blog has gone so far as calling the FTC the U.S.’s de facto Data Protection Authority (DPA). We respectfully disagree. The FTC is facing unprecedented challenges, while state attorneys general (AGs), who have similar—and in some instances greater—authority, are taking more and more steps to protect the privacy of their citizens.

More from Divonne Smoyer

Practical Privacy

On Making Privacy Policies More Simple and User-Friendly

By Allen Brandt, CIPP/US, CIPP/E, CIPM
From the BBC’s cookie notice

David Vladeck, while he was heading up the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, frequently railed against the current generation of consumer-facing privacy policies, and he has data to back him up: Consumers just don’t read or understand the things.

More from Allen Brandt

Privacy Profession

What Makes a Good Privacy Professional?

For companies striving to maintain compliance with myriad global data protection and privacy rules, and keeping up with future developments, the privacy professional is key. Increasingly companies seem to think that they have to hire qualified lawyers to fulfil this role, but is that really the case?

Most privacy roles require someone who can advise on the rules and their application in practice. So do you want a lawyer who just advises on the interpretation on the law and leaves decision making on privacy and subsequent implementation to the business? Or do you want a practitioner who can drive the privacy programme from the ground up, making key decisions and delivering privacy effectively across the business?

More from Emma Butler

Opinion

Legal Reform Is Needed on Both Sides of the Atlantic, Not Just in Europe

I recall that in the 1990s and early 2000s, it was often a struggle to get people outside of Europe to take EU data protection law seriously. The perceived lack of enforcement in the EU, and the dynamic legislative climate in the U.S., meant that more attention was given to U.S. developments.

The situation is now reversed, and there has been intense interest in the European Commission’s proposal for a General Data Protection Regulation published in January 2012, and in related developments such as calls for reform of the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor. U.S.-based lobbyists have descended in hordes on the EU institutions; U.S. government representatives travel to Brussels to lobby the EU, and U.S. authors publish articles and papers on complex issues of EU law. Brussels has become the center of the global privacy world.

This causes us in Europe to wonder: Why doesn’t the U.S. work as hard to improve its own privacy law as it does to lobby for changes in the EU?

More from Christopher Kuner